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Thread: Does sun have a number?

  1. #1
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    Does sun have a number?

    Does sun have any official designation at all which is numeric?

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    Do you mean something analogous to numerical designations for stars in catalogues such as the BD, HD or SAO catalogues?

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    No.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    No.
    As far as I'm concerned it's number one in my universe.
    I know that I know nothing, so I question everything. - Socrates/Descartes

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaCaptain View Post
    As far as I'm concerned it's number one in my universe.
    This could be my worst ever yellow Sun joke, but... I just can't do it.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
    Does sun have any official designation at all which is numeric?
    Only in an alien catalog.

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    Zero: ⊙
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Only in an alien catalog.
    Good answer. As far as we are concerned, the major like the sun and moon have traditional names (sometimes multiple names) in all languages, so thereís never a need to number them and the IAU doesnít give them numbers.
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Good answer. As far as we are concerned, the major like the sun and moon have traditional names (sometimes multiple names) in all languages, so there’s never a need to number them and the IAU doesn’t give them numbers.
    I'm waiting for the IAU to do just that...

    Usually catalogue numbers are assigned because there's not a name already. Of course, Gliese 743 doesn't tell one much less than Fomalhaut except that the latter was bright enough for someone to notice before they invented telescopes.

    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    This could be my worst ever yellow Sun joke, but... I just can't do it.
    You've got my curiosity. Good or bad, lets hear it.
    I know that I know nothing, so I question everything. - Socrates/Descartes

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaCaptain View Post
    You've got my curiosity. Good or bad, lets hear it.
    Ok, but know that I'm reluctant with this one. It will help if you are less than 6 years old; it's that immature, but it is yet another way to use hyperbole and humor(?) to make a point in the name of heliochromology...

    What does "Number 1" (or going No. 1) and yellow have in common? The slight ugliness is to associate with the ubiquitous, and usually erroneous, use of a yellow Sun. Newton said sunlight is "perfectly white" and I'm trying to help remove all subsequent staining of it, sunset images not withstanding.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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    I give up. What do they have in common?
    As above, so below

  13. #13
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    The Sun peaks in the green, doesn't it?

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    Don't peek on the green, even if its the first hole.

    -- Somebody else, I didn't post it!

    .

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    "Zero Zero One."
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I give up. What do they have in common?
    Hmmm, perhaps its cultural. Try asking a juvenile the difference between "going no.1" and "going no. 2", it won't be something that builds my esteem but I will continue to use tricks, hopefully more subtle and less graphic, to advance us past the the yellow sun misconceptions. [Aren't you glad you asked?]
    Last edited by George; 2017-Dec-01 at 04:44 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    The Sun peaks in the green, doesn't it?
    Nope. If you simplify the Sun's energy distribution by using the Planck equation for the Sun's effective surface temperature (5777K), then, yes, you will get a computational peak of 501.6 nm (green). If you choose a Planck distribution temperature that produces a profile that is a better fit for the Sun itself, then a 5850K temperature is the better choice, which gives you a peak of 495.3 nm (border of green and cyan).

    Peak wavelengths mean very little in determining what color the eye beholds since we must consider all the colors that are produced by every star in question. Color results come from the product of spectral energy distribution (all the colors) entering the eye and the effective spectral receptivity of the eye (how we see each wavelength). [Point sources, however, seem to have a slight redshift to them. But the Sun is not a point source.]
    Last edited by George; 2017-Dec-01 at 04:39 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ara Pacis View Post
    "Zero Zero One."
    The problem for this star is that we can't look at it; it's too bright! So why give it a number if we can't see it?
    Last edited by George; 2017-Dec-01 at 04:36 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    The problem for this star is that we can't look at it; it's too bright! So why give it a number if we can't see it?
    I am having a discussion elsewhere with someone who thinks you can't see the sun unless you put a filter in the way...

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    I "get it" George, I also thought of it before you posted, it's basic toilet humor. Like if the sun was a brown dwarf it would be #2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Ok, but know that I'm reluctant with this one. It will help if you are less than 6 years old; it's that immature, but it is yet another way to use hyperbole and humor(?) to make a point in the name of heliochromology...

    What does "Number 1" (or going No. 1) and yellow have in common? The slight ugliness is to associate with the ubiquitous, and usually erroneous, use of a yellow Sun. Newton said sunlight is "perfectly white" and I'm trying to help remove all subsequent staining of it, sunset images not withstanding.
    If the term "perfectly white" is in this context is analogous to its use in acoustic, it means that the sunlight has equal intensity at all [visible] wavelengths. This is known not to be true for sunlight. Newton didn't have the sort of apparatus necessary to quantitatively measure intensity.

    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  22. 2017-Dec-02, 06:34 PM
    Reason
    starting new thread instead

  23. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    If the term "perfectly white" is in this context is analogous to its use in acoustic, it means that the sunlight has equal intensity at all [visible] wavelengths. This is known not to be true for sunlight. Newton didn't have the sort of apparatus necessary to quantitatively measure intensity.
    So as not be be too much a distraction from the OP, I elected to finally put some "bullets" up for the Sun's color over here.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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    The sun has a letter to go with its name. It's Sol A, the brightest star in the Sol system. Nemesis is Sol B.

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    Sorry to dwell on this, but I still donít get the joke. I get the question but not the answer is it this?

    What do the sun and number one have in common?
    They are both yellow!

    Or is it supposed to be:

    Neither is yellow!

    ....
    As above, so below

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    It is getting a wee bit uncomfortable now but I won't say you're in trouble.

    In at least one measurement system, our Sun is the number, ie how we count the mass of stars and black holes: the number of solar mass Msol or
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    Why does the Sun need an identifier, it's not really hard to identify not like say HIP2021, SAO255670, HD2151 or HR98, all the same star by the way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by speach View Post
    Why does the Sun need an identifier, it's not really hard to identify not like say HIP2021, SAO255670, HD2151 or HR98, all the same star by the way.
    It doesn't need one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by speach View Post
    Why does the Sun need an identifier, it's not really hard to identify not like say HIP2021, SAO255670, HD2151 or HR98, all the same star by the way.
    Alright. So, tomorrow the Florborkls arrive and take you with them in their starship, and you have a wonderful time, and see the Orion nebula up close, sit down for a pan galactic gargle blaster, perhaps a touch of Sagittarius A*, a quick polar North view of the milky way... and then you suddenly realize it would be nice to see your family again. Florborkl say "ok, sure, no problem! Hope you liked the trip! We copied your catalogs. Which star?". You say "Errrrrr...".

    Joking aside, it's not an unreasonable idea to have it assigned some identifier in catalogs of stars with certain properties, is it, and to ask about it if you want to know? I suppose you can argue about what "official" means.
    ____________
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    "Your right to hold an opinion is not being contested. Your expectation that it be taken seriously is." -- Jason Thompson
    "This is really very simple, but unfortunately it's very complicated." -- publius

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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    Alright. So, tomorrow the Florborkls arrive and take you with them in their starship, and you have a wonderful time, and see the Orion nebula up close, sit down for a pan galactic gargle blaster, perhaps a touch of Sagittarius A*, a quick polar North view of the milky way... and then you suddenly realize it would be nice to see your family again. Florborkl say "ok, sure, no problem! Hope you liked the trip! We copied your catalogs. Which star?". You say "Errrrrr...".
    Joking aside though, if the ETs were intelligent to be able to take our catalogs, which are made from the earth's perspective, and convert them into something they can recognize in their own catalogs, then they would have to know where the picture was taken from, and hence would have to know where the sun is.

    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    Joking aside, it's not an unreasonable idea to have it assigned some identifier in catalogs of stars with certain properties, is it, and to ask about it if you want to know? I suppose you can argue about what "official" means.
    But I think it does have an identifier. Just call it the Sun. We give identifying numbers to exoplanets because there are tons of them and we don't remember their names. There is no point in giving an identification number to Mars because Mars is Mars.
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    It is getting a wee bit uncomfortable now but I won't say you're in trouble.
    I guess I'll have to watch my pees and qs then.
    As above, so below

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