Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 92

Thread: Do "spoilers" really spoil things for you?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,155

    Do "spoilers" really spoil things for you?

    I've never been bothered one way or another about spoilers. Sometimes they actually seem to improve my enjoyment. And, of course, we all have favourite books and movies that we go back to again and again, without feeling that the first reading has spoiled subsequent enjoyment. (Maybe changed the nature of the enjoyment, but not removed it.)
    I was reminded of this when I ran into what might be considered a serious spoiler for Season 1 of Westworld, which I'm about halfway through watching and finding pretty tedious going so far. The spoiler actually perked me up and made me feel I might watch a bit more of a programme I was otherwise losing interest in.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,486
    yes, a spoiler would spoil a work of fiction for me, if it was an important part of the plot. A good piece of fiction shouldn't need a spoiler to keep someone reading/watching, IMO.

    Someone told me they sometimes read the end of a book first...I don't quite understand that.

    You can sort of suspend memory of a story with a good piece of fiction, when rereading/watching...like for me with the Hitchhiker's Guide books...the series which I have read several times, years ago...couldn't read it again now though.
    Formerly Frog march..............

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,155
    Quote Originally Posted by Mudskipper
    A good piece of fiction shouldn't need a spoiler to keep someone reading/watching, IMO.
    I don't think I understand what you mean by this.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,486
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I don't think I understand what you mean by this.

    Grant Hutchison
    I was just going by your comment about Westworld.

    I was reminded of this when I ran into what might be considered a serious spoiler for Season 1 of Westworld, which I'm about halfway through watching and finding pretty tedious going so far. The spoiler actually perked me up and made me feel I might watch a bit more of a programme I was otherwise losing interest in.
    you were finding it pretty tedious going, and the spoiler made you feel like you might watch some more.

    I don't know how you came across the spoiler, but it seemed it might have kept you watching.

    I have no idea whether Westworld is a decent series...is it based on the old movie of the same name?
    Formerly Frog march..............

  5. #5
    Spoilers do not ruin anything for me but there others who do not like it so I try to honor their wishes. Some people want to be surprise when they experience something for the first time. Me it kind of wets the juices like the smell of a meal being cooked, you get the gist of what is happening but you do not get the detail of what is happening.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    http://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Anzakistan
    Posts
    10,824
    Spoilers do bug me a lot; the first time I see/read something, I want to learn things from the source. Surprises should be surprises; even the mundane details - I don't want to know beforehand.

    I was thinking about this just last night, I was watching the last few episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation; and I'd learned from another thread that Q is involved. I was annoyed, I'd rather that had been a surprise.

    But then, there in the title sequence was: 'Special Guest John de Lancie as "Q"'.

    So of course I spent the rest of the episode thinking "oh, 'Q' is doing this". And it was a bit spoiled, because the reveal of "Q" had much less impact. But the programme had spoiled itself.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    13,370
    Considering how often I re-read or re-watch old favorites, I suppose not. I'd still not rather have them the first time through.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,486
    I used to watch The Matrix over and over, and I had my favourite scenes like the pill scene etc....it's like listening to a song you like, you can still enjoy it after many hearings.
    Formerly Frog march..............

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,155
    Quote Originally Posted by Mudskipper View Post
    I was just going by your comment about Westworld.

    you were finding it pretty tedious going, and the spoiler made you feel like you might watch some more.
    Ah, I see.
    I don't think Westworld needed a spoiler - it needed a kick up the bottom, IMO. It just happened that the spoiler made me think, "Well, I wonder how they'll work that in." It piqued my curiosity, rather than enhanced my waning enjoyment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mudskipper View Post
    I have no idea whether Westworld is a decent series...is it based on the old movie of the same name?
    It is. And there's an interesting premise in there, arising from the old film, but I don't think they're carrying it off at all well.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    14,602
    Yes, they do for me (but maybe not always). Also I don't want to watch some scene that others have already over-analyzed before I can form my own opinion. "That scene where Captain Urgleblork gets killed was acted really badly, and besides there was a 21st century contrail in the sky and they didn't use those anymore". While I've been watching 6 episodes, slowly building a viewer-sympathy connection with the good captain, the director put a lot of work in building up to that death scene, it being a pivotal point in the story and all that, and now I watch that episode thoroughly annoyed because I know "my" guy is going to die, and I just keep watching the blue sky for that darn half-second of contrail.

    Especially shows that I expect to watch later, I'll stay away from threads on its topic here. Spoilers or not. I've not opened any Star Trek thread recently, since I'm 4 or 5 episodes behind in watching.

    But sometimes seeing a spoiler, or some story detail on Wikipedia might just cause me to reverse my decision to not watch or read something.
    ____________
    "Dumb all over, a little ugly on the side." -- Frank Zappa
    "Your right to hold an opinion is not being contested. Your expectation that it be taken seriously is." -- Jason Thompson
    "This is really very simple, but unfortunately it's very complicated." -- publius

    Moderator comments in this color | Get moderator attention using the lower left icon:
    Recommended reading: Forum Rules * Forum FAQs * Conspiracy Theory Advice * Alternate Theory Advocates Advice

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    5,560
    No. I usually watch a movie because I've read a thorough description of the plot somewhere and it sounds interesting enough. I've rarely seen a surprise that was worth the trouble.

  12. #12
    Glom's Avatar
    Glom is offline Insert awesome title here
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    11,188
    It can be very mixed.

    On the one hand, I wouldn't have liked to have been spoiled about a certain thing you all know in The Force Awakens. There was tension for me not knowing what was going to happen. I can imagine it would be the same for Empire too, though I wouldn't know since it predates me and was already cultural knowledge before I first saw the film.

    A number of twists in Battlestar Galactica were great what with them being twists the unfolded as I watched them. I wouldn't have wanting the awakening of the four to have been spoiled for me.

    On the other hand, I can think of a few times when knowing ahead of time amped things up.

    One example is 24. I watched the seasons out of order. I saw season 2 first as part of a drinking game. My friends told me that Penny Johnson's character was evil based on events from the first season. When we later did season 1, the character starting all innocent, it added something seeing the character develop into the evil character I had learned about.

    Another is Elementary. I saw the later episodes with Irene Adler before the initial ones so when I watched them, the tension was greater. The scene where Sherlock and Joan were searching the house where they find Irene oozed tension because I suspected this was Irene's entrance, knowing she wasn't dead. And of course knowing who she really was added menace to all the scenes before the Big Reveal. That being said, I'm not sure of the Big Reveal would have been better had I not known. I got a kick out of the dramatic irony as Sherlock found out.

    Then there's Harry Potter 6, which I only saw after Harry Potter 7. The film is pretty awful, what with Harry being on drugs both on and off screen. But the one redeeming feature was the flashback scenes with Tom Riddle. The actor turned in a genuinely Lecterish performance. When he first mentioned horcruxes, I got a little chill knowing the significance they would have later. Had I watched the films in order, horcrux would just have been some silly made up term that meant nothing when it was first uttered.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    1,577
    It varies for me as there movies where I want to know the ending and there are others that are best left in a shroud of mystery.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    11,218
    I hate spoilers, I try to avoid them at all costs.
    Solfe

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    15,874
    I don't know about "spoil" as in "ruin", but I do feel a bit disappointed if a moment meant to be surprising isn't a surprise to me and I don't get the full emotional impact. For example, when I was reading Derek Lundy's Godforsaken Sea, about the 1996-97 Vendée Globe, I didn't look up the names of any of the sailors as they were mentioned, because I wanted the same suspense about who won, who finished, who dropped out of the race, and if anyone might not survive that people had watching it unfold in real time.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Anzakistan
    Posts
    10,824
    There's a reason Homer Simpson walking out of a theatre, past a long line waiting to get in to see "The Empire Strikes Back", talking about a certain family relationship, was a thing.

    (I hold the existence of that Simpsons' scene as proof that more people would be annoyed by that spoiler than not.)
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,155
    I guess this reflects a difference between people who are interested in how the story is told and what the story contains. I'm very much in the former camp, and I don't feel particularly gratified by surprises per se - I'm interested in why the surprise is where it is, and how (if at all) the audience was prepared for it.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,155
    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    (I hold the existence of that Simpsons' scene as proof that more people would be annoyed by that spoiler than not.)
    Well, it certainly suggests that more people who write for "The Simpsons" would be annoyed. Or perhaps that people who write for "The Simpsons" think that more people who watch "The Simpsons" would be annoyed. Or perhaps that people who write for "The Simpsons" think that more people who watch "The Simpsons" will recognize the trope.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    12,777
    They don't ruin things for me either. I really enjoyed Gandhi, even though I knew how it was going to end.
    As above, so below

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,486
    knowing the twist in An Inspector Calls made seeing it on the stage really boring.
    Formerly Frog march..............

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    5,560
    When I was growing up, we didn't check theater schedules, if indeed there were such things. We went when we were ready, and got there when we got there. It was usually a double (or triple) feature. You'd watch the end of some movie, then the other movie, then sit through the next showing of the first one up until it got familiar, whereupon you usually left. It was a challenge to deduce how the unfolding story fit into what you'd already seen. If either or both films were good, you might go back and see it again (no home video, and it wouldn't play on TV for some time). (Spoilers? Hah! I spit on your spoilers. Now, go away or I shall taunt you a second time!)

    i hate to think how many films I saw in that disjointed fashion. Those were the days.
    Last edited by DonM435; 2017-Dec-18 at 04:49 AM.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    1,041
    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    They don't ruin things for me either. I really enjoyed Gandhi, even though I knew how it was going to end.
    He gets the girl?

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,157
    Sometimes spoilers annoy me, sometimes not. I think it depends on how much I have invested in the characters.

    Ironically, I accidentally came across the big twist in The Sixth Sense before I saw the movie. I saw it anyway because everyone kept talking about it. The thing is, I still was surprised by the twist. Just not very observant, I suppose.

    I've also noticed that spoilers can be given by the chapter titles in books. Years ago I was reading a young reader's chapter book to my son when he was around seven or eight years old. The story took place in colonial America, and a chapter ended with a young boy being captured by a British squadron. I said something like, "Oh, I hope he'll be okay," mostly to get my son thinking about the plot. He said, "Yeah, he will," and he pointed to the chapter title on the next page. The title was "A Daring Escape!" which really let out the dramatic tension set up by the previous chapter.

    But it can also work in an ironic effect. Another book my son and I read was one of the Captain Underpants series. The two mischievous protagonists had just performed some prank on their principal, and one of them worried that they would get caught. The chapter ends with the other kid reassuring his partner-in-crime, "There's no way we're going to get busted!" Then you turn the page to read, "Chapter Seven: Busted!"

    My son and I had a good belly laugh about that one.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    5,560
    I once read a very short movie description in a newspaper's TV listings, for the Alfred Hitchcock film Psycho. It read "A man disguises himself as his mother and commits murders."

    That is a bit much, to torpedo a classic in "ten words or less."

    Maybe that's why another's summary went something like "A boy and his mother operate a lonely motel."

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    13,370
    I find self-spoilers kind of annoying. The reveal of the dalek in the Ninth Doctor episode "Dalek" would have been much more shocking if the episode had had a different title.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    30,319
    I once wrote a review of Soylent Green without spoilers as an intellectual exercise. I wrote a review of The Crying Game with no spoilers because I believe "the surprise" isn't as vital to the story as its hype has indicated it is.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,155
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    I once wrote a review of Soylent Green without spoilers as an intellectual exercise. I wrote a review of The Crying Game with no spoilers because I believe "the surprise" isn't as vital to the story as its hype has indicated it is.
    Ah, The Crying Game provided me with a rare "I-told-you-so" moment.
    When my wife and I watched it at the cinema, I identified the nature of the character played by Jaye Davidson immediately, and remarked on it to my wife. She is one of the few people in the world who can say "Pshaw!" convincingly, and that's what she said in response to my observation. I've rarely been vindicated quite so convincingly as I was shortly afterwards.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    7,671
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Ah, The Crying Game provided me with a rare "I-told-you-so" moment.
    When my wife and I watched it at the cinema, I identified the nature of the character played by Jaye Davidson immediately, and remarked on it to my wife. She is one of the few people in the world who can say "Pshaw!" convincingly, and that's what she said in response to my observation. I've rarely been vindicated quite so convincingly as I was shortly afterwards.

    Grant Hutchison
    agree about the crying game, my that seems a long time ago. I remember being quite shocked in the original alien film and not at all shocked in all subsequent versions, so forewarned was forewarned and to some degree spoiled. Thus I found the remade Bladerunner a disappointment but I should have read the books as advised afterwards. I did read Dune trilogy and thus found the film very lacking. However I find I do not read reviews much, they are often spoilers and today's reviewers do not seem to chime with my choices.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Anzakistan
    Posts
    10,824
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    ... However I find I do not read reviews much, they are often spoilers ...
    I try not to even watch the trailers, as they give away too much.

    (Let alone "comedies" where you find every funny bit was already seen in the trailer ...)
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    7,671
    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    I try not to even watch the trailers, as they give away too much.

    (Let alone "comedies" where you find every funny bit was already seen in the trailer ...)
    I'm a sucker for art house films so I avoid most reviews and am rarely disappointed with films from all over the place with subtitles. I much prefer those to dubbing. there are some great art movies from the new York school for example and the only spoiler is to say they are worth watching if you like that kind of thing.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •