Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: When will the Earth run out of lava?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    1,662

    When will the Earth run out of lava?

    Not in the sense of "all the magma poured out and left the planet a hollow globe" but from geothermal heat cooling. Earth is already out of some lavas like komatiite rock lava, when will the other types join it in extinction?
    I read that the outer core will "freeze" in 2.3 billion years (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeli...the_far_future), will it happen then? Or later, because of some local Mantle phenomenon? Or sooner, because the outer core is too deep to send lava to the surface?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    15,801
    I cannot say. I searched the Web with Google: When will the Earth run out of lava? and I couldn't understand a word of the results.
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    12,763
    Quote Originally Posted by 01101001 View Post
    I cannot say. I searched the Web with Google: When will the Earth run out of lava? and I couldn't understand a word of the results.
    Same here.

    Related question, though: when will the world run out of lava lamps?
    As above, so below

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    47,379
    Thread closed pending moderator discussion.

    Thread reopened. Let's keep the sarcasm out of the discussion
    Last edited by Swift; 2017-Dec-20 at 01:38 AM.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    167
    Maybe soon after the Earth and Moon are in orbital tidal lock ? Or at least soon after the moon is far enough away not to raise an earth tide ?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bend, Oregon
    Posts
    5,981
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Not in the sense of "all the magma poured out and left the planet a hollow globe" but from geothermal heat cooling. Earth is already out of some lavas like komatiite rock lava, when will the other types join it in extinction?
    I read that the outer core will "freeze" in 2.3 billion years (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeli...the_far_future), will it happen then? Or later, because of some local Mantle phenomenon? Or sooner, because the outer core is too deep to send lava to the surface?
    That Wiki page suggests that subduction will cease in 600 million years. Subduction is one of two major processes that generate surface lava (the other being mantle plumes that create hot spots).

    The core does not 'send lava to the surface'. From your wording, I'm not certain if you think some lava (magma) derives from as deep as the core. Magma is generated from partial melting of the lithosphere and asthenosphere.

    This Wiki page suggests the outer core will mostly solidify in 3-4 billion years.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Future_of_Earth

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    266
    temporary set back by cooling and or running out of radioactive heating in the future

    but then our sun expands and heats us up again
    will that led to surface melting ? and surface lava ?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    8,468
    Quote Originally Posted by nota View Post
    temporary set back by cooling and or running out of radioactive heating in the future

    but then our sun expands and heats us up again
    will that led to surface melting ? and surface lava ?
    Yes, it will. By the time the Earth heats up enough to have a molten surface, most of the water and atmosphere will have boiled away; so the quality of the melted rocks will be much different to the kinds of lava we are familiar with today.

    I believe there is some doubt as to whether the Earth will be swallowed up by the Sun when this happens - it depends on the rate of mass-loss by the Sun, and friction with the solar wind, if I recall correctly. Maybe one of the real astronomers on this forum would have a better idea.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,085
    Eburacum, while there IS doubt, the smart money is betting on the "grim outcome".

    They have to do too many headstands for the sims to let the predicted mass loss relax the orbit of Earth outside of the photosphere of the future red giant Sol. The future of even Mars is sketchy when you get dispassionate about the subject.

    Earth is going to be a smudge of soot 7 billion of years from now.

    Interesting enough Mars will start to get Earth-like insolation and surface temperatures 6.5 billion years from now, but then only has 1 billion years of these conditions before it's swallowed by the red giant Sol as well. The paper's authors express doubt as whether life will evolve in this time frame as Mars will be completely dead tectonically. But, more recent papers demonstrate that life on Earth formed incredibly soon after the surface of the Earth cooled enough to permit it, so they may be wrong about that.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •