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Thread: Game of Life site

  1. #1
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    Game of Life site

    I know many of you probably already know this, but there is a great site for discussing Life and other CAs. It is http://www.conwaylife.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    I know many of you probably already know this, but there is a great site for discussing Life and other CAs. It is http://www.conwaylife.com/
    Oh my, what a gift, I am transported back to school in the 18th C when we played that out on graph paper instead of doing Latin prep or memorising collective nouns. The along came Visicalc, anyone remember that? Thanks for the link.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Used to write life based screen savers during bored lunch hours at work.

    Always astounded when a randomly seeded field would quickly coalesce into recognisable patterns; like a bunch of glider guns firing gliders across the screen.

    (Made for bad screen savers.)
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

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    I was afraid this was that wholesome family game that Art Linkletter used to do advertisements for.

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    Somewhere out there, there's is not only a glider gun, but there's a glider gun factory, that continuously spawns glider guns. So cool.

    And someone made a 3D C-GoL that models a 2D C-GoL. It has two infinitely tall and wide walls that leave a stable single slice in which the 2D version lives.

    And other people have been exploring Gardens of Eden.
    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2017-Dec-20 at 11:44 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    The along came Visicalc, anyone remember that?
    Yep. The Father of computer spread sheets! It justified the several thousand dollar purchase of our company's first computer (Apple IIG, IIRC) so that we could produce a pro-forma to the bank. The main purchase reason, of course, was to play the cool games that were coming out. Ultima cost me a lot of sleepless but happy nights.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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    I loved VisiCalc, I happened to be designing a boat hull and discovered you could generate a row of stars proportional to a number. With some scaling and tractor drive paper I could generate kind of accurate forms to paste onto plywood. It was CAD on VisiCalc.!
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Ahhh...those were the days.
    Learned programming in 1976 on punch cards. Each punch machine had it own defect...this one could not punch 0s, that one jumped a space ahead so you had to backspace after each character, the one over there sent a blank card along with each punched card...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Ahhh...those were the days.
    Learned programming in 1976 on punch cards. Each punch machine had it own defect...this one could not punch 0s, that one jumped a space ahead so you had to backspace after each character, the one over there sent a blank card along with each punched card...
    You were lucky, we had to punch those cards with a sharpened carrot and test them on an abacus with some beads missing and that was on the good days.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    You were lucky, we had to punch those cards with a sharpened carrot and test them on an abacus with some beads missing and that was on the good days.
    You got carrots?

    Luxury.

    Why, when I was a lad, we had to program in a shoebox in the middle of a busy road....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Ahhh...those were the days.
    Learned programming in 1976 on punch cards. Each punch machine had it own defect...this one could not punch 0s, that one jumped a space ahead so you had to backspace after each character, the one over there sent a blank card along with each punched card...
    I learned programming in 1976 using a Texas Instruments SR-51 programmable calculator with 20 memories and programs of up to 224 keystrokes. Not very roomy, but it had branching, looping, subroutining, and indirect addressing. It was enough to let me know that I could do computer programming.

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    Around 1980 one of my friends wrote a 4864 grid Life program for the TRS-80 that did 100 generations per minute. He gave me a copy of the source code so I could experiment with it. I found out that the standard birth/death rules were obviously well chosen.

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    In high school in 1975, we had a programmable calculator which worked with cards with filled in bubbles, like an SAT test. Not really sophisticated enough to teach true programming, but a start.
    Never saw or heard of that calculator again.
    By 1977 I was learning BASIC, Fortran and COBOL, as well as assembly code.

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    I did some programming on an SR-52 and a TI-58. I bought a Statistics module for the latter, and was able to work as a freelance tech writer analyzing survey data thanks to that. This led to my first programming position on a "real" computer.

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