Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Expedition to Mars on my own

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    9

    Expedition to Mars on my own

    If I wish to start an expedition to Mars of my own, with my own crew, what do I do in the first place?

    Actually I have a couple of ideas. The first thing I think to be adviseable to do is to drive down the flight time to an amount of a couple of months (or less?) to begin with. I'm thinking in terms of using a spacecraft powered by electromagnetic thruster. My first concern is to keep the crew from exposure to cosmic radiation as much as possible. Thus electromagnetic thruster, to bring the length of the journey to as short time as possible. There are also a couple of things relating to the expedition I think to address. Keeping people as safe as possible comes first, the point I'd like to make clear from the very beginning.

    There are competitors in the race to Mars out there, their plans having been unveiled and pretty well known. And that I'm planning to use the fastest engine by far doesn't mean we will be first.

    It's good we have state-owned competitors and private ones as well but as to me I don't have detailed plans, dont' have a crew of my own. So I'd like to ask: what do I do to start putting an expedition like this together? What would be reasonable and workable steps towards the goal? Your suggestions?

    What I think is the right thing to do is to put my crew at the least risk as possible with the view to creating a colony with as safe conditions as we can create.

    I appreciate answers of everybody who knows what is a workable way of going about this one. Thanks in advance.

    (The question was asked on a Q&A platform, but I found it's simply impossible to give an answer to such kind of question (and say "OK. this one is the best one, the issue is closed"). so I've posted it on the forum, where we can have discussion where everyone's opinion and thoughts equally matter, a kind of talk not just focused on a certain goal but capable to grow and lasting however long it takes for us to come up with a workable plan and go ahead.)

    What broader picture I propose to have in mind is thinking about ways of us having a colony on Mars. I'll do anything within reason to keep my folks in good helthy condition out there on Mars and in space, on the way to it and back. I would very much like to hear opinions on how we set and achieve objectives in this area, and further about engine-related issues. But ultimately this discussion is about what practical steps are we have to take.

    What do I do to start putting an expedition like this together?

    So what would you suggest to start with? Everyone's independent voice is to be heard. Thanks in advance to everyone.
    Last edited by AstronautID; 2017-Dec-25 at 10:31 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    12,660
    To start with, you are talking about a project that will cost billions of dollars. So unless you are an executive from some big IT company and have tons of money of your own, you’ll have to raise the money, and the people who you ask for money will want to know what qualifies you to lead such an expedition.
    As above, so below

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    235
    1. Aquire money
    2. Hire the best engineers (aeronautical, chemical, industrial), psychologists, chemists, architects, geologists, physiologists, etc.
    3. Obtain more money.
    4. Prepare a detailed plan covering launch systems, spacecraft, base design, recycling, crop production, energy sources, in situ resource exploitation, industrial system, life support, ergonomics, mental health, etc.
    5. Add additional money.
    6. Thourgoughly test each item of equipment and process, on Earth, in space and -remotely, where appropriate - on Mars
    7. Get even more money.
    8. Locate, select, train, test, filter, train further, test, filter, repeat until crew is satisfactory.
    9. Top up the money.
    10. Launch the project for real.
    11. Continue to add money.
    12. As for 1,3,5,7,9, and 11.

    Further details upon request.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    9
    Jens, thank you for your support and handing me the hat of leader! But don't rule out the emergence of other leaders like Eclogite; it's going to be team work.

    Eclogite, you deserve a hug right now! Everything is to the point. Don't stop now!
    You're strong at planning this stuff and what you're going to say - by answering these questions - will highly likely to become most decisive and important in the development of colonies on Mars in the foreseeable future:

    1) How do we know they are best ones? (pros in point 2)
    2) Which of these items are more and which less difficult for us to do?
    3) What can we effectively do before stage 1?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    15,775
    Well, before stage 1, it might be adviseable to read all or many of the previous studies into hypothetical expeditions to Mars and weigh their various flaws and advantages.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    226
    Hello AstronautID,

    I like your question.

    For $5-10 Billion (?), SpaceX might let you be first to step on Mars.

    Good Luck!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Well, before stage 1, it might be adviseable to read all or many of the previous studies into hypothetical expeditions to Mars and weigh their various flaws and advantages.
    KaiYeves, thank you for your opinion and joining the discussion!

    I'm pretty sure there are a lot of people around who have done this already and do have this in their brain, aren't there?

    7cscb, thanks for Good Luck! Our folks will need it too!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    235
    Quote Originally Posted by AstronautID View Post
    Eclogite, you deserve a hug right now! Everything is to the point. Don't stop now!
    You're strong at planning this stuff and what you're going to say - by answering these questions - will highly likely to become most decisive and important in the development of colonies on Mars in the foreseeable future:

    1) How do we know they are best ones? (pros in point 2)
    2) Which of these items are more and which less difficult for us to do?
    3) What can we effectively do before stage 1?
    As KaiYeves has pointed out several groups and individuals have already immersed themselves in such speculation and produced plans of varying levels of detail. Despite your kind words I'm moderately dumb - I would not have been able to offer my simplified suggestions if I had not been exposed, in a small way, to some of those plans.

    For starters, if you have not already done so, read Zubrin's "A Case for Mars: The Plan to Settle the Red Planet and Why We Must", ISBN-13: 978-1451608113. Then read and study as man of the references in his Bibliography as you can. Zubrin's proposal to use in situ resources to greatly reduce the required mass of the spacecraft and thereby cut costs dramatically was adopted and adapted by NASA for their own Mars manned flight plan, the Mars Reference Mission.

    As to your specific questions:
    1. Assess their acadamic qualifications, their achievements and their attitudes. How do you make sure you have a square peg for a square hole? Make sure you have a PEG: Persistent, Empathetic Genius.
    2. All the sytems are difficult, but probably not a major stretch over current technology. Blending them effectively together is more difficult. Funding the development and testing is the most difficult.
    3. Before Stage 1, gather data.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,017
    Quote Originally Posted by AstronautID View Post
    Jens, thank you for your support and handing me the hat of leader! But don't rule out the emergence of other leaders like Eclogite; it's going to be team work.

    Eclogite, you deserve a hug right now! Everything is to the point. Don't stop now!
    You're strong at planning this stuff and what you're going to say - by answering these questions - will highly likely to become most decisive and important in the development of colonies on Mars in the foreseeable future:

    1) How do we know they are best ones? (pros in point 2)
    2) Which of these items are more and which less difficult for us to do?
    3) What can we effectively do before stage 1?
    1) Ask other pros. Aerospace is not a huge professional community, and the pros all know each other or know somebody who knows them.

    2) 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 are the hardest.

    3) Put together a plan to raise the money.

    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,838
    Price the most common alloys and fuels you need.
    If that does not leave you reeling in horror, carry on.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,017
    Quote Originally Posted by Squink View Post
    Price the most common alloys and fuels you need.
    If that does not leave you reeling in horror, carry on.
    Just one potential problem -- making threaded fasteners is here.

    Then you've got all sorts of issues involving qualifying everything from thrusters to the method for joining wires.

    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Eclogite View Post
    Zubrin's proposal to use in situ resources to greatly reduce the required mass of the spacecraft and thereby cut costs dramatically was adopted and adapted by NASA for their own Mars manned flight plan, the Mars Reference Mission.
    Having extra propellent on board amounts to ability of reinforcing walls of a ship and give crew more shielding from deadly cosmic radiation, which is a consideration. Unless our team members argue reasonably otherwise and propose something better we are going to stick to what helps keep our folks safer.

    As to NASA's Mars Reference Mission, let's discuss its flaws and advantages. With the plan we have by far whatever it offers we seek to do better.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    9
    Squink, Swampyankee, welcome and thanks for your encouraging posts!

    Quote Originally Posted by Eclogite View Post
    2. All the sytems are difficult, but probably not a major stretch over current technology. Blending them effectively together is more difficult. Funding the development and testing is the most difficult.
    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    2) 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 are the hardest.
    So if I obtain and allocate money in the amount enough to fund sending a ship with a crew to Mars I will have taken on the most difficult?

    And the people who will endure hardships of a spaceflight months under cosmic radiation, and then work on setting up a base on a planet where there aren't air to breathe and anything sustaining life, again, under radiation - and who will beforehand devote their lives to training - and then will have to make their return trip, will take on the easiest part, won't they?

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •