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Thread: Tatoos: is it just me?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    The former mostly, but the later is tied into it-- I don't know if stereotypes of university majors are the same in the UK, but in the US Poli-Sci majors seem to (or are perceived to) dress and ornament themselves "professionally" even in casual situations (and to watch or read the news constantly).
    "Professionally" dressed students in the UK would be something of a contradiction in terms. As my wife once quipped: "What do you call a smartly dressed student? The defendant."

    Grant Hutchison
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  2. #32
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    Can they tattoo some hair on my head? Otherwise, no, I don't like them at all.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  3. #33
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    Interesting about the hair, maybe they need to invent a 3D tattoo for that one?

  4. #34
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    Combine 3D Printer & tattooing machine might be the answer. I have had so little hair for so long it would probably feel like a heavy weight on my head if it was replaced. And, I too find the popularity of tattoos amazing.

  5. #35
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    In my forties and tattooed. I've officially lived longer with all my ink than I have without them. I like them, some are funny stories and some are emotional. I see them in the mirror and still think they look pretty. The only thing that bugs me is when someone assigns their own made up reason for me getting inked and then uses it to mock me. Nothing about my decision had anything to do with rebellion or trying to be original. Typically, I would see the placement on someone else, like how it looked, and then pick a design to put something there, on myself. I was advised, once, to try a temporary tattoo before I did something permanent and I am glad I listened. I saw a woman with a black widow tattooed on her hand and considered doing it. My boyfriend at the time suggested that might not be a good idea, considering how much I hate spiders. I did the temporary tattoo, scared the wits out of myself a few times, washed it off and never gave that another thought. The only thing I caution is getting the name of a person, as in a spouse or partner. When I got my [now] ex husband's name tattooed over my heart, I didn't believe in divorce. It's alright, though, because it was my artist's first stencil. It looks more like "Silly" than "Billy." No regerts

  6. #36
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    I think their value is directly proportional to their rarity.

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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by closetgeek View Post
    The only thing I caution is getting the name of a person, as in a spouse or partner. When I got my [now] ex husband's name tattooed over my heart, I didn't believe in divorce. It's alright, though, because it was my artist's first stencil. It looks more like "Silly" than "Billy." No regerts
    I think I've mentioned before the woman I met who had several men's names tattooed on her forearm - all but one were scored out.

    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    His left arm has a full sleeve Polynesian tattoo. He's had people (Samoan) get a bit aggro in pubs because they see it as cultural appropriation. His way out is to say his mate (I forget the name, but it's Polynesian) gave him the design and is happy to explain the meaning, and they back off knowing he has some "connection".
    This seems like the exact inverse of a tattoo story that originated with my father. One of his friends was part of the Allied occupation forces in Japan, after the Second World War. He decided (as many people apparently did), to have his name tattooed on his arm in Japanese characters. The tattooist showed him the characters, pronounced them, and assured him that this was the closest approximation to his name possible in Japanese.

    About thirty years later he discovered he'd been walking about with the words "stupid gaijin" tattooed on his arm.

    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  9. #39
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    My go-to response for why I don't have tattoos is, "That'd be like putting a bumper sticker on a Ferrari."
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    My go-to response for why I don't have tattoos is, "That'd be like putting a bumper sticker on a Ferrari."
    "My other car's a Skoda."

    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
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  11. #41
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    It was common practice with some armies in the mid 20th century, as part of the pacification process of a newly taken city, to summarily execute all persons with a tattoo.

    The remaining population being much easier to handle afterward. Not sure if that's actually a filter effect or just the effect of shooting a couple of dozen people in public on the rest of the populace though.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
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  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    This seems like the exact inverse of a tattoo story that originated with my father. One of his friends was part of the Allied occupation forces in Japan, after the Second World War. He decided (as many people apparently did), to have his name tattooed on his arm in Japanese characters. The tattooist showed him the characters, pronounced them, and assured him that this was the closest approximation to his name possible in Japanese.

    About thirty years later he discovered he'd been walking about with the words "stupid gaijin" tattooed on his arm.

    Grant Hutchison
    There are many stories about this happening to Westerners who don't speak Chinese or Japanese but want their name or a phrase in characters as a tattoo anyway, even today. In one case, a guy thought he was getting "I love you", but got "Love is pain".

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    My go-to response for why I don't have tattoos is, "That'd be like putting a bumper sticker on a Ferrari."
    I must remember that one! I think it was Henrik Olsen who defined a tattoo as "A permanent reminder of a temporary feeling", or something to that effect.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I must remember that one! I think it was Henrik Olsen who defined a tattoo as "A permanent reminder of a temporary feeling", or something to that effect.
    Depends who you are.

    I have one over 40 years old.

    I'm still good.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    There are many stories about this happening to Westerners who don't speak Chinese or Japanese but want their name or a phrase in characters as a tattoo anyway, even today. In one case, a guy thought he was getting "I love you", but got "Love is pain".
    Yeah. What I like about my father's version of the story is the carefully calculated set-up by the tattoo artist, and the sense of retrospective inevitability.
    "I'm a member of an unpopular occupying force, in the immediate aftermath of a bitter war. What will I do this weekend? I know, I'll ask a local to give me a tattoo I can't read! What could go wrong with that?"

    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
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  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I must remember that one! I think it was Henrik Olsen who defined a tattoo as "A permanent reminder of a temporary feeling", or something to that effect.
    Actually Jimmy Buffet.

    https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/jimm...ryfeeling.html




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  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    My go-to response for why I don't have tattoos is, "That'd be like putting a bumper sticker on a Ferrari."
    Or, in my case getting a nice tattoo would like putting a van Gogh on a Yugo.
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  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    You know schlaugh, I think I actually learned that one from you, and you did credit Jimmy Buffet at the time. I searched and found the quote on page one of the "Stuff you just don't get" thread. I must have misremembered Henrik writing it because further down the page he linked to a flash mob that I enjoyed. Oops.

  19. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    My go-to response for why I don't have tattoos is, "That'd be like putting a bumper sticker on a Ferrari."
    Or, in my case getting a nice tattoo would like putting a van Gogh on a Yugo.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  20. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Or, in my case getting a nice tattoo would like putting a van Gogh on a Yugo.
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Or, in my case getting a nice tattoo would like putting a van Gogh on a Yugo.
    I'm not sure if this was funnier the first or second time.
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  21. #51
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    I don't have any tattoos ... don't really care for them. However, two of my kids have tattoos.

    My youngest got one on each forearm while he was in college. Interestingly, he always wore long sleeved shirts around my stepmother. He didn't want her to know.

    My daughter got a smallish one on her wrist. And immediately regretted it. She even looked into removing it, but finally decided to keep it.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They donít alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
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  22. #52
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    I managed to escape the US Navy without a tattoo, but have recently been considering a small, perhaps 4 cm, image of a lizard on one of my forearms. I just haven't seen the right design yet.

  23. #53
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    One little part of my job is documenting people's tattoos & piercings (so employees can compare if they spot one they think is new, for medical reasons). It's been amazing how many guys have tattoos of skulls, Grim Reapers, eyes, torn-skin effects, and other assorted representations of death, violence, and destruction. I'd heard of this stereotype before, but had no idea how many people really actually walked into it. It's hard to imagine anything more ridiculous than trying to show what an edgy dangerous rebel you are by conforming so stringently with such a standard routine convention.

    A co-worker had a tiny Harry Potter lightning bolt on the side of the first segment of a finger. It has to be removed so she can join the Air Force. The removal process will leave a scar. I told her that, for a Harry Potter lightning bolt, a scar instead of a tattoo is an upgrade anyway and she should have gone for scarification instead of ink in the first place.

    The funniest tattoo story I've gotten there was a woman with an ex-boyfriend's nickname. I don't even know which order is best to put each of these points in because there's more than one that could be put at the end as the "punchline" after the others set it up:
    •The nickname was crossed out. Keeping it intact apparently wasn't an option, but removal would have been too expensive.
    •She had asked for his actual name, but the tattoo artist used his nickname anyway and she didn't find out til it was done.
    •The use of the nickname was because the tattoo artist was his mother.
    •Part of the reason she wanted his real name instead was because it was also her father's name, so she could adjust the interpretation if they didn't stay together.
    •That part of her plan didn't seem to have considered the fact that, if that contingency happened, it would mean she had her father's name on her butt.
    •The nickname was "Razor".

  24. #54
    One thing a never got was the sticking pieces of metal where metal had no place being, earrings is one possible exception. I can just see them trying to get by a metal detector.
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  25. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by gzhpcu View Post
    The trend here in Europe is for young people to get increasingly larger tatoos. Often the whole arm is covered. Or most of the upper back. Maybe it is a generation gap and I am getting to be an old fogey, but I do not like them. It started with small roses, which was OK, in my opinion. But now it is skulls, death heads or very intricate landscapes.

    I remember the old days when it was mostly sailors. Now, seems like lots of youngsters get them.

    Wondering if I am in the minority. Any thoughts?
    I suspect not. I personally dislike tattoos, but I also know some very nice people who have large tattoos, so I have placed tattoos into the same category into which I place beards and hair styles: a trivial cosmetic feature that tells me nothing of the person.

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  26. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    One little part of my job is documenting people's tattoos & piercings (so employees can compare if they spot one they think is new, for medical reasons). It's been amazing how many guys have tattoos of skulls, Grim Reapers, eyes, torn-skin effects, and other assorted representations of death, violence, and destruction. I'd heard of this stereotype before, but had no idea how many people really actually walked into it. It's hard to imagine anything more ridiculous than trying to show what an edgy dangerous rebel you are by conforming so stringently with such a standard routine convention.
    My bold. Do you think that is a little bit of an attribution error going on there? How many people have told you, honestly, that they got a particular tattoo to show how rebellious and dangerous they really are? Is it not more likely that they saw the tattoo or style of tattoo and simply liked the way it looked? How many external modifications have you personally done, be it temporary or permanent, specifically to show how edgy and dangerous you are?

    I have a tribal band on my right bicep. What's worse, it doesn't go all the way around. I have gotten two assumptions thrown at me more times than I can count. The first is that I think I look tough. Not really, I just like the way it looks. The second is that I wimped out since it doesn't go all the way around. Not really, it was the tattoo I saw and liked and that's how it fit my arm. In fact, I had no idea when choosing that particular pattern, how sensitive that little section on the inside of the arm actually was.

  27. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    One little part of my job is documenting people's tattoos & piercings (so employees can compare if they spot one they think is new, for medical reasons).
    Wait. Since I'm guessing that employees aren't spotting new tattoos and piercings in themselves, are they surveying each other and reporting any suspicious body decoration activity to you? Or are the employers doing this?
    What medical reason could justify this sort of surveillance in the workplace?

    Grant Hutchison
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  28. #58
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    Sounds more like a memory aid. ďDid I get that cat tat before or after my last MRI?Ē But thatís just a guess.


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  29. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    There are many stories about this happening to Westerners who don't speak Chinese or Japanese but want their name or a phrase in characters as a tattoo anyway, even today. In one case, a guy thought he was getting "I love you", but got "Love is pain".
    There is a meme of a Chinese woman with the English word "water" tattooed on her shoulder. They used a really lousy font, so it is obviously a photoshop job. Thank god they didn't use Comic Sans.

    Maybe I could get the words "Comic Sans" in Comic Sans as a tattoo.
    Solfe

  30. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    There are many stories about this happening to Westerners who don't speak Chinese or Japanese but want their name or a phrase in characters as a tattoo anyway, even today. In one case, a guy thought he was getting "I love you", but got "Love is pain".
    That could bring some interesting if not unexpected results.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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