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Thread: Tatoos: is it just me?

  1. #1
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    Tatoos: is it just me?

    The trend here in Europe is for young people to get increasingly larger tatoos. Often the whole arm is covered. Or most of the upper back. Maybe it is a generation gap and I am getting to be an old fogey, but I do not like them. It started with small roses, which was OK, in my opinion. But now it is skulls, death heads or very intricate landscapes.

    I remember the old days when it was mostly sailors. Now, seems like lots of youngsters get them.

    Wondering if I am in the minority. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I quite like large, abstract, Polynesian-style sleeve and upper body tattoos.
    I don't get why people would want a portrait on the back of their calf, though, which seems to be a thing. I see a lot of guys wearing shorts and shaving the backs of their legs to show off their little pictures of people.

    Grant Hutchison
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  3. #3
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    Nope, not just you, add mega body piercing to the list.

  4. #4
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    The first time I noticed tattoos on a "normal" person was circa 1980,
    on a very nice, warm summer day, so tattooed person could roll up
    her shirt or whatever she did to expose her midsection. She was in
    her early twenties. I'd never seen tattoos quite like hers before or
    since, even though tattooing proliferated in the decades since then.
    And though I thought the idea was grotesque, what made her tattoos
    unique was actually rather appealing: She had a line of animals
    marching around her waist. The only one I remember for certain was
    a giraffe, but you can guess there was probably a horse, lion, maybe
    an elephant, and the like. Think animal crackers. If she had to have
    that quantity of tattoos, she could have done a lot worse for content.
    It wasn't great art, but it didn't make her look like a psychopath.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis
    http://www.FreeMars.org/jeff/

    "I find astronomy very interesting, but I wouldn't if I thought we
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  5. #5
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    Our 33 year old prospective son-in-law is a nice guy. He ia an airplane mechanic. He had a huge tatoo of a WW II fighter on his left arm and a skull and bones on his leg. Oh yes, he has face piercings and a mohawk hairdo. We get along fine, I never mentioned his bodywork because it is none of my business. I find it a shame though....

  6. #6
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    Can't stand them myself but they are very common for people in their 20's in Australia.

  7. #7
    Don't get myself, but in this to each his/her own.
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  8. #8
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    Some tattoos are ugly, but to each their own. My Mother gave me the rule of thumb that if I want a tattoo, I need to tape a paper version of the picture I want to my wall and look at it every single day for a year, and see if I still like it then. But I've never seen a design I liked well enough to even put to the wall test.

  9. #9
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    Good advice. After a workplace conversation that turned to the topic of tattoos, a young colleague showed me a little maple leaf she'd had done.
    "What's the message in the maple leaf?" I asked.
    "Don't get drunk next-door to a tattoo parlour in Canada," she replied.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Root View Post
    The first time I noticed tattoos on a "normal" person was circa 1980,
    We're normal, and my wife and I got tattoos in 1978. One benefit, according to my wife, is she didn't have to elaborate when she told our kids "don't"

  11. #11
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    I find it is a question of measure. When entire body parts are covered, I find it ugly.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    We're normal, ...
    Everyone thinks they're normal. They're wrong.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis
    http://www.FreeMars.org/jeff/

    "I find astronomy very interesting, but I wouldn't if I thought we
    were just going to sit here and look." -- "Van Rijn"

    "The other planets? Well, they just happen to be there, but the
    point of rockets is to explore them!" -- Kai Yeves

  13. #13
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    I don't think I'm normal. I don't know how normal people cope with normal life, to be honest.

    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  14. #14
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    I have noticed a few new tattoo removal shops opening up around town here, not exactly easy come - easy go?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Good advice. After a workplace conversation that turned to the topic of tattoos, a young colleague showed me a little maple leaf she'd had done.
    "What's the message in the maple leaf?" I asked.
    "Don't get drunk next-door to a tattoo parlour in Canada," she replied.

    Grant Hutchison
    I think Jimmy Buffet had a similar message.

  16. #16
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    My wife has half dozen or more. When she drinks, she offers to take me to get one. I usually quip that I am more distinctive without.

    Edit - I probably shouldn't comment since I drew several of them myself.
    Solfe

  17. #17
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    Why not employ an ' washable tattoo ' . Same bang , less grief ,short and long .

  18. #18
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    Why not employ an ' washable tattoo ' . Same bang , less grief ,short and long .
    The parlours might offer that option, but it could be a bad business decision putting them in the red....ink

  19. #19
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    The viewing party at NASA Headquarters in Washington DC for the Curiosity rover's landing was a pretty big deal, so I dressed up a bit, including a NASA-logo temporary tattoo on my left arm (see photo). After sleeping in the next day, I went to say goodbye to the people I had been interning with for the past two months and return my badge. It was a Congressional office, so I left most of the punk stuff I had been wearing the night before behind and wore a normal short-sleeved polo shirt. Because I was wearing short sleeves, the temporary tattoo was still visible, and every single one of my coworkers thought it was a real tattoo and asked if I had gone out to get it at 4 in the morning after watching the landing.

    This is not something that would be at all in line with my personality, and I thought that after two months they would know that, but they still all came to the same conclusion, which I found both annoying and hilarious.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by gzhpcu View Post
    Wondering if I am in the minority. Any thoughts?
    You may be in the minority, but then so am I; I tend to agree with you. I am generally put off by tattoos and generally find them strange to see, though I have on rare occasions seen one that I liked. And things like piercings bother me even more.

    And yes, they seem increasingly common among young adults in the US too. I find it particularly strange to see tattoos and piercings on professional people.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Because I was wearing short sleeves, the temporary tattoo was still visible, and every single one of my coworkers thought it was a real tattoo and asked if I had gone out to get it at 4 in the morning after watching the landing.

    This is not something that would be at all in line with my personality, and I thought that after two months they would know that, but they still all came to the same conclusion, which I found both annoying and hilarious.
    Interesting that none of them seemed to be able to tell the difference between a temporary tattoo and a very recent real tattoo. Had none of them ever had a tattoo themselves?

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Interesting that none of them seemed to be able to tell the difference between a temporary tattoo and a very recent real tattoo. Had none of them ever had a tattoo themselves?

    Grant Hutchison
    Evidently not. They're not really a Poli-Sci major thing, I guess. (They're pretty common in the anthropology department, though-- one of the professors has a lot.)

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Evidently not. They're not really a Poli-Sci major thing, I guess.
    Ah, interesting. I'd assumed it was a general outbreak among Young People. Is that a "job prospects" consideration, or a tribal identity thing?

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  24. #24
    It is, I am an individual so I will do whatever everyone else is doing.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  25. #25
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    My wife's water horse tattoo. If I had known she was going to do this, I would have finished it. If you look at the front leg where it meets the body, you can see a J and E. I never bothered to work in the N as she threw it in a frame. Then she got ink. Oops.
    Solfe

  26. #26
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    Yikes. Why is her foot ten times bigger than her shoe?

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Yikes. Why is her foot ten times bigger than her shoe?

    Grant Hutchison
    That was the day she got the tattoo. The swelling eventually went down.
    Solfe

  28. #28
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    My Daughter has a partner who's Scottish. (Military family, so actually bounced around the World a lot).

    His left arm has a full sleeve Polynesian tattoo. He's had people (Samoan) get a bit aggro in pubs because they see it as cultural appropriation. His way out is to say his mate (I forget the name, but it's Polynesian) gave him the design and is happy to explain the meaning, and they back off knowing he has some "connection".

    Personally I don't mind it, just adds some facet to his personality.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.
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  29. #29
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    I just can't imagine any picture or text that I would want permanently attached to my body.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Ah, interesting. I'd assumed it was a general outbreak among Young People. Is that a "job prospects" consideration, or a tribal identity thing?

    Grant Hutchison
    The former mostly, but the later is tied into it-- I don't know if stereotypes of university majors are the same in the UK, but in the US Poli-Sci majors seem to (or are perceived to) dress and ornament themselves "professionally" even in casual situations (and to watch or read the news constantly).

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