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Thread: 7% of Scott Kelly’s Genes Changed After a Year in Space

  1. #1
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    7% of Scott Kelly’s Genes Changed After a Year in Space

    The NASA Twin Study, which assessed how spending a year aboard the ISS affected Scott Kelly's health (compared to his twin brother, Mark), has just been released
    The post 7% of Scott Kelly’s Genes Changed After a Year in Space appeared first on Universe Today.


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  2. #2
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    Interesting. In his book Scott Kelly complained of excessive CO2 on the ISS, due in part to a pair of dodgy scrubbers and NASA indifference. It's apparently a major pain to service the two machines.

    From the article:
    In other words, in addition to the well-documented effects of microgravity – such as muscle atrophy, bone density loss and loss of eyesight – Scott Kelly also experienced health effect caused by a deficiency in the amount of oxygen that was able to make it to his tissues, an excess of CO2 in his tissues, and long-term effects in how his body is able to maintain and repair itself.

  3. #3
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    Not really.

    His DNA is still the same as his brother. What's changed is the expression of his DNA; how the genes are being read and interpreted. Also known as epigenetics, these reading changes occur due to environmental factors. Our epigenetics start changing at birth, so twins will vary according to their differing environments and experiences. Take a pro scuba diver, climber etc. and you'll see similar changes vs. their less adventuresome twins.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Not really.

    His DNA is still the same as his brother. What's changed is the expression of his DNA; how the genes are being read and interpreted. Also known as epigenetics, these reading changes occur due to environmental factors. Our epigenetics start changing at birth, so twins will vary according to their differing environments and experiences. Take a pro scuba diver, climber etc. and you'll see similar changes vs. their less adventuresome twins.
    I was going to mention that too. I'm not sure why, but somehow the media really went wild on this. There are some stories now about the misleading titles.

    http://cornellsun.com/2018/03/16/des...ange-in-space/
    As above, so below

  5. #5
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    It's not even a measure of the change in DNA expression. The 7% figure is a measure of the proportion of genes with changed expression which had not reverted to their previous state [some period of time] after return to Earth.

    Grant Hutchison

  6. #6
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    A 7% change for one year in space, so if he had stayed up there for 14.3 years he would be totally alien. ;-)
    Anyone calculate how much younger he would be? Could he be the first born of the twins and now be the younger of the 2?

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