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Thread: Sometimes I wish

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    But again, it should work both ways. If you are an artist or an actor or a business person, you should have some basic understanding of, and maybe an interest in, at least some aspects of the sciences.
    I mean, if you're not interested, I'm not sure there's anything we can do about that. But I'm rather fond of the interdisciplinary approach, where you see how they all tie into one another.
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    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmocrazy View Post
    So by coming from an average background like the majority you were fortunate enough to experience "real life" ...
    I wouldn't necessarily classify it along a fortunate/unfortunate axis. There were things that happened to me, because of the circumstances in which I grew up, that undoubtedly had adverse effects on me, personally. But over the years, having an understanding of the lives of my poorest patients (who are of course disproportionate consumers of health care) probably helped me do my job more effectively.
    So I wouldn't wish my particular circumstances on anyone else, and it required a significant degree of luck to get to where I am now. But it's a source of concern to me that, whereas I was part of a minority demographic in my medical school year, I'd nowadays be considered a startling outlier. That can't be a good thing.

    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    A good idea. Just as we (nominally) teach art, music, and literature as well as STEM and language, we need a broader curriculum of life skills and experiences in our educational systems. Especially in a democracy where the knowledge and views of the average voter determine so much.

    Unfortunately it's unlikely to be instituted anytime soon. Politics.
    Well, Mao tried it in the late sixties, and Pol Pot a little later. Not tremendously successful though.


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  4. #34
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    I wish people would smile more.
    Solfe

  5. #35
    Another reason I wish people could do some kind of seasonal work is for them to understand how things work. Like growing stuff, they would learn that somethings grow better at different seasons or it take time to get plants even ready plant into the ground.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  6. #36
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    I mean, I learned that because my mother had a garden?
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I wouldn't necessarily classify it along a fortunate/unfortunate axis. There were things that happened to me, because of the circumstances in which I grew up, that undoubtedly had adverse effects on me, personally. But over the years, having an understanding of the lives of my poorest patients (who are of course disproportionate consumers of health care) probably helped me do my job more effectively.
    So I wouldn't wish my particular circumstances on anyone else, and it required a significant degree of luck to get to where I am now. But it's a source of concern to me that, whereas I was part of a minority demographic in my medical school year, I'd nowadays be considered a startling outlier. That can't be a good thing.

    Grant Hutchison
    I think hardships can often make people appreciate things more. Though you may not wish your particular circumstances on others (I cannot comment on this as I don't know any details of your life and up bringing) I'm sure from some of what ever you endured helped, at least in part, for you to gain an appreciation for things. Education comes in many guises and life experience is a good tutor. Of course there are extremes, like anything in life overdosing is just as, if not often more detrimental. But the good old saying - "a little bit of what is bad for you is good for you".
    I don't know... maybe it's just the way I was brought up. My father was tough but fair and he certainly loved, wanted the best for me and tried to prepare me for life out there in the big wide world. It was also important to him that I appreciated things in life and firmly believed that I should experience hardships to gain this appreciation. As a father and mature adult myself I think he did a good job, that's my opinion others may not agree

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmocrazy View Post
    I think hardships can often make people appreciate things more. Though you may not wish your particular circumstances on others (I cannot comment on this as I don't know any details of your life and up bringing) I'm sure from some of what ever you endured helped, at least in part, for you to gain an appreciation for things. Education comes in many guises and life experience is a good tutor. Of course there are extremes, like anything in life overdosing is just as, if not often more detrimental. But the good old saying - "a little bit of what is bad for you is good for you".
    I don't know... maybe it's just the way I was brought up. My father was tough but fair and he certainly loved, wanted the best for me and tried to prepare me for life out there in the big wide world. It was also important to him that I appreciated things in life and firmly believed that I should experience hardships to gain this appreciation. As a father and mature adult myself I think he did a good job, that's my opinion others may not agree
    I have quite strong feelings about this.
    I think growing up in a situation in which I could not have many of the things that my friends enjoyed, but had to either do without, or work and wait for them, certainly did me no harm. Though it nowadays drives my wife crazy that I'm incapable of impulse-buying anything, and have to spend a few days waiting to see if I still want it. (At which point, I usually don't, so that works out fine from my point of view.)
    But I think there was a common idea at the time I was growing up that it was "character building" for young male children to spend a lot of time doing pointless things that made them miserable, and that undoubtedly blighted my young life in ways which were utterly unproductive, and at times counterproductive. I recently opened a copy of Scientific American dating from the late 1960s, and caught sight of an advertisement for a military academy headlined "Make A Man Of Your Son", and found myself actually shaking with impotent rage - not at the existence of military academies, but at the target demographic for that particular headline.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  9. #39
    One thing you never said around here when my grandfather was around is "I'm bored", to him that meant that he could put you to work.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I have quite strong feelings about this.
    I think growing up in a situation in which I could not have many of the things that my friends enjoyed, but had to either do without, or work and wait for them, certainly did me no harm. Though it nowadays drives my wife crazy that I'm incapable of impulse-buying anything, and have to spend a few days waiting to see if I still want it. (At which point, I usually don't, so that works out fine from my point of view.)
    But I think there was a common idea at the time I was growing up that it was "character building" for young male children to spend a lot of time doing pointless things that made them miserable, and that undoubtedly blighted my young life in ways which were utterly unproductive, and at times counterproductive. I recently opened a copy of Scientific American dating from the late 1960s, and caught sight of an advertisement for a military academy headlined "Make A Man Of Your Son", and found myself actually shaking with impotent rage - not at the existence of military academies, but at the target demographic for that particular headline.
    Graham thinks the particular deprivations he suffered didn't hurt him, either. On the other hand, he exemplifies the expression "penny wise, pound foolish" and won't spend a dime if he can find the same thing for a penny, even if the one for a penny is considerably lower quality and will need to be replaced ten times before the dime one will and he has the dime to spend. He finally acknowledged recently that he should've bought a house ten years ago, which he didn't because he was afraid of being land-poor. Instead, he's stuck buying a house in a sellers' market. Housing prices around here are going up because people from Seattle have decided we're close enough for a commute. I can track all his patterns of spending behaviour to the way he was raised and the deprivations he suffered from being poor.

    Even he wouldn't consider a military academy for our son, though!
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I have quite strong feelings about this.
    I think growing up in a situation in which I could not have many of the things that my friends enjoyed, but had to either do without, or work and wait for them, certainly did me no harm. Though it nowadays drives my wife crazy that I'm incapable of impulse-buying anything, and have to spend a few days waiting to see if I still want it. (At which point, I usually don't, so that works out fine from my point of view.)
    But I think there was a common idea at the time I was growing up that it was "character building" for young male children to spend a lot of time doing pointless things that made them miserable, and that undoubtedly blighted my young life in ways which were utterly unproductive, and at times counterproductive. I recently opened a copy of Scientific American dating from the late 1960s, and caught sight of an advertisement for a military academy headlined "Make A Man Of Your Son", and found myself actually shaking with impotent rage - not at the existence of military academies, but at the target demographic for that particular headline.

    Grant Hutchison
    We share a common characteristic with this.(my bold) Maybe it was our up bringing, I suspect I had a similar upbringing to yourself with similar circumstances. I'm not tight with money by any means and I certainly don't "penny pinch" but I don't impulse buy and I refuse to take out a loan (other than a property mortgage) to purchase anything. If I can't afford something I don't buy it until I can afford it. But I, like you have to mull over it a few days to decide if its something I really do want.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Even he wouldn't consider a military academy for our son, though!
    Yeah, I think that "Make A Man Of Your Son!" meme was/is a separate issue, perhaps even more prevalent among the wealthy than the cash-strapped (many of the man-making options coming with a hefty price tag). And to some extent a product of the time, with parents who had lived through the Second World War, now immersed in the Cold War, and not really very happy with the direction in which "the permissive society" was taking their children.

    I suspect I would still be living in rented accommodation if I hadn't married. But my wife had already bought a flat, so when I moved in I started paying half her mortgage. That felt enough like paying rent to trick me into accepting the idea of living in debt, which otherwise would not have sat easily.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  13. #43
    I could just disappear.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  14. #44
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    I wish to have a man who will truly love me <3

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orionspear View Post
    I wish to have a man who will truly love me <3
    They say there is at least one person out there for everyone.

    I hope you get your wish

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