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Thread: New Microorganisms Discovered In Earth's Stratosphere

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    New Microorganisms Discovered In Earth's Stratosphere

    India claims to have found extra terrestrial bacteria.

    http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper...le23652738.ece

    Experiments conducted by ISRO using high altitude balloons have detected three different types of extra terrestrial bacteria, highlighting the possibility of life beyond the earth, noted astrophysicist Jayant V.Narlikar said here on Monday.

    Delivering a lecture on ‘Searches for life outside the earth’ as part of the Space Physics Laboratory Day, he said the three types of bacteria detected through these experiments were so far not identified on earth. One of these bacteria, Bacillus isronensis, was named after ISRO.
    More from ScienceDaily

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0318094642.htm

    Three new species of bacteria, which are not found on Earth and which are highly resistant to ultra-violet radiation, have been discovered in the upper stratosphere by Indian scientists.

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    Hm. That's a pretty iffy use of the term "extra terrestrial"

    That term is usually used to mean "not of Earth".

    But in this case - while technically it is not on or in the ground - it does not follow that it is "not of Earth".

    And since this article is about the possibility that it might be from a legit extra-terrestrial source, it's kind of begging the question (i.e. positing the conclusion in the premise).

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Hm. That's a pretty iffy use of the term "extra terrestrial"

    That term is usually used to mean "not of Earth".

    But in this case - while technically it is not on or in the ground - it does not follow that it is "not of Earth".

    And since this article is about the possibility that it might be from a legit extra-terrestrial source, it's kind of begging the question (i.e. positing the conclusion in the premise).
    True but it does show that life can exist there and are highly resistant to ultra-violet radiation. So more reason to believe it can also exist on Venus.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Hm. That's a pretty iffy use of the term "extra terrestrial"

    That term is usually used to mean "not of Earth".

    But in this case - while technically it is not on or in the ground - it does not follow that it is "not of Earth".

    And since this article is about the possibility that it might be from a legit extra-terrestrial source, it's kind of begging the question (i.e. positing the conclusion in the premise).
    Now another article that implies any asteroid that skips through our atmosphere can pick up the microbes and take them along with them. The article is more on how humans have launched microbial life into outer space, the last 60 years, without intending to.

    http://www.leonarddavid.com/without-...m-this-planet/

    It was the greatest car ad ever conceived. A red Tesla Roadster was launched into space with a jaunty spaceman mannequin at the wheel. As it streaks around our solar system at speeds of seven miles per second, its dashboard screen reads a playful, ‘Don’t panic’.

    Initial press coverage was fawning. The biggest question was, “Is this art or advertising?” It was never mentioned that the car and its mannequin are loaded with microbes. There hadn’t even been any real attempt to clean it prior to launch. No big deal. It’s just floating in space and won’t impact a planet for a million years or more. However, its elliptical orbit around the Sun has it crossing Mar’s orbit every 18.8 months. It will often get close.

    No one seems to care that this craft will gradually deteriorate over time from the impact of innumerable micrometeorites during its endless loops throughout the solar system. And no one seems to understand that particles of those micrometeorites will ricochet off the car and mannequin and carry bits and pieces of it wherever they go. And no one has noted that on every miniscule bit, there will a new set of traveling companions. Wherever those particles go, associated microbes will now circulate with those particles, some of which will travel outward for light years.

    It is actually the same for all the NASA spacecrafts that have ever been launched. To NASA’s credit, they have actually tried to be careful. NASA has been rightfully concerned about the possibility of sending our planetary life out into space. To that end, they enacted rigorous ‘clean’ rooms. Prior to launch, vehicles were carefully scrubbed to get rid of any lurking microbes. When our space craft were launched, they were thought to be sterile.

    Unfortunately, what NASA believed to be true, was not. It is now understood that the culture techniques that NASA relied upon to determine sterility were utterly insufficient. In our contemporary era, there are new tools of genetic assessment that permit our identification of a much wider range of microorganisms than in prior decades. In fact, it is now known that fewer than 10% of all microbes can be cultured in the standard manner that NASA was diligently applying. Therefore, the tests that NASA relied upon to issue their declarations of sterility were unfortunately completely

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