Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 31 to 40 of 40

Thread: Is it bad to drink water with spicy food?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bend, Oregon
    Posts
    6,013
    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    ...As for loving hot chilies, I'm not sure that a chilihead can explain it to somebody who isn't one (yet). That even thinking of spicey food waters the mouth. Yes, there's also a bit of a challenge element to it, how hot can you eat? But I think that's more of a gimmick, to chiliheads anyway. They know that by consuming more and more, their heat tolerance will increase. Perhaps it's more those not really familiar with chilies who see it as a bucketlist or man-from-boys event?
    Yes, and I think part of (all of?) the disbelief non-chileheads have with people who like spicy foods stems from people's different tolerance levels. Those who break out in a sweat after eating mild jalapenos cannot fathom how someone would get near a really hot chile such as the habanero. But for those who are tolerant, it really isn't that big of a deal. Chile lovers generally aren't engaged in culinary masochism as some suppose.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,730
    The argument that water would distribute the stuff in your mouth is really weird. If water could do that, then water could also completely get rid of it.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,638
    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    I'm glad it wasn't obvious, I think.
    It has a companion, and to some extent complementary, initialism, RATTMCOI (pronounced "Rat-McCoy").
    Readily Apparent To The Most Cursory Of Inspections.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    14,830
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    The argument that water would distribute the stuff in your mouth is really weird. If water could do that, then water could also completely get rid of it.
    That is sort of like saying that if water can quench a fire, then using a plant sprayer should be able to save a burning house fueled by a thermite fire.
    ____________
    "Dumb all over, a little ugly on the side." -- Frank Zappa
    "Your right to hold an opinion is not being contested. Your expectation that it be taken seriously is." -- Jason Thompson
    "This is really very simple, but unfortunately it's very complicated." -- publius

    Moderator comments in this color | Get moderator attention using the lower left icon:
    Recommended reading: Forum Rules * Forum FAQs * Conspiracy Theory Advice * Alternate Theory Advocates Advice

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,232
    As a child one of the side dishes my mother used to prepare with certain meals was sliced mushrooms and serrano chilies sautéed in butter. I was about twelve when I could tolerate having a second bite.

    Since then I've learned that the rocoto chili, at least for me, has the maximal heat/flavor combination. I liked them so much I read up on them. Seems they are a base species of hot pepper, which considering their flavor makes sense. They taste very much like green bell peppers. Pronounced even through the enormous heat.

    This culminated last year when my brother and I dropped in to one of the local Indian restaurants that had just earned a Michelin star. They had a sampler of various breads with different spicy oils on them and my brother and I ordered it. The maître de cautioned us but we told him we'd be alright.

    The wow moment came when I noticed the maître de and a man in chef's clothes both watching us from across the room. When we stopped eating to look back was when they realized they were staring. The maître de blushed and explained the owner and himself were watching us because in the whole time they had been running the restaurant they had never seen anybody not only finish the hot bread sampler, but eat it while having a casual conversation about something else. We basically ignored it.

    (Impressing the owner of a Michelin rated Indian restaurant, now THAT'S fire eating! )

    Mind you, we were not playing "challenge the chef", a fool's game with regard to picante seasoning.

    After explaining himself the maître de went on to recommend an unfiltered saki to follow it with. Hadn't had unfiltered saki before. It was actually a very good recommendation and we had a second bottle as well.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    14,830
    Rocotos are in the Capsicum pubescens species, which means hairy. With most chilies you have to wait until there are ripe fruits to be able to tell which sort they are. The pubescens species you can tell from quite young age, because the leafs do have tiny hairs on them. I've only grown one type, but they were favorites from year one. I grow them every year now, even this year when I grow only 4 other types. Thick skinned, quite hot, very tasty both fresh and as powder. Beautiful purple flowers too. One day I hope to find a Peruvian restaurant to taste real Rocoto renello
    ____________
    "Dumb all over, a little ugly on the side." -- Frank Zappa
    "Your right to hold an opinion is not being contested. Your expectation that it be taken seriously is." -- Jason Thompson
    "This is really very simple, but unfortunately it's very complicated." -- publius

    Moderator comments in this color | Get moderator attention using the lower left icon:
    Recommended reading: Forum Rules * Forum FAQs * Conspiracy Theory Advice * Alternate Theory Advocates Advice

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,359
    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    One day I hope to find a Peruvian restaurant to taste real Rocoto renello
    Wow, those look fresh out of the Kilueau volcano!
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    12,993
    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    After explaining himself the maître de went on to recommend an unfiltered saki to follow it with. Hadn't had unfiltered saki before. It was actually a very good recommendation and we had a second bottle as well.
    By that you mean sake, i.e. rice wine? If so, I hope you don't mean 1.8-liter bottles! In fact it is often sold in 720 ml bottles, so I suppose that's what you mean.
    As above, so below

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,232
    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    Rocotos are in the Capsicum pubescens species, which means hairy. With most chilies you have to wait until there are ripe fruits to be able to tell which sort they are. The pubescens species you can tell from quite young age, because the leafs do have tiny hairs on them. I've only grown one type, but they were favorites from year one. I grow them every year now, even this year when I grow only 4 other types. Thick skinned, quite hot, very tasty both fresh and as powder. Beautiful purple flowers too. One day I hope to find a Peruvian restaurant to taste real Rocoto renello
    Slang, they're perennial where it doesn't freeze. The ones we grew lived in a half barrel for seven years before succumbing to the Great Freeze of '91. Didn't get over 32F for almost two weeks!

    Can you imagine such a thing?

    Anyway, every year the chilis got more flavorful which is why I bring this up. (Well, that and to make fun of your winter weather.)
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    14,830
    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    Slang, they're perennial where it doesn't freeze.
    I know.. I guess Linnaeus named the main branch "annuum" because he grew them in Sweden and they wouldn't survive winter. In fact two of the types I'm growing this year are from seeds from chilies picked from perennial shrubs from two coworkers "mom's garden shrub", one in South America, one in Malawi.

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    The ones we grew lived in a half barrel for seven years before succumbing to the Great Freeze of '91. Didn't get over 32F for almost two weeks!

    Can you imagine such a thing?
    Rub it in, will yah?

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    Anyway, every year the chilis got more flavorful which is why I bring this up. (Well, that and to make fun of your winter weather.)
    Got one plant surviving the winter indoors, and it's producing madly already, maybe they will be tastier this year too! But that probably still depends a lot on soil, food, and conditions too. Problem with taking them indoors in winters is that you give pests perfect conditions to survive too, and fighting aphids and their ilk ain't fun.
    ____________
    "Dumb all over, a little ugly on the side." -- Frank Zappa
    "Your right to hold an opinion is not being contested. Your expectation that it be taken seriously is." -- Jason Thompson
    "This is really very simple, but unfortunately it's very complicated." -- publius

    Moderator comments in this color | Get moderator attention using the lower left icon:
    Recommended reading: Forum Rules * Forum FAQs * Conspiracy Theory Advice * Alternate Theory Advocates Advice

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •