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Thread: HCN Chemistry Question From Wiki.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by kzb View Post
    It's correct. Using bleach is unnecessarily hazardous. Also, the concentration of bleach for sale was cut from 18% to 5% a few years back.
    Well, that change was to stop it being unnecessarily hazardous.
    I'm just surprised because I saw (and smelt) hypochlorite bleach in use in a public place in the UK within the last couple of months. I'm guessing the restriction is a feature of your workplace, rather than some general rule.

    Grant Hutchison
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Well, that change was to stop it being unnecessarily hazardous.
    I'm just surprised because I saw (and smelt) hypochlorite bleach in use in a public place in the UK within the last couple of months. I'm guessing the restriction is a feature of your workplace, rather than some general rule.
    In the UK household bleaches are defined as <10% hyochlorite, anything higher counts as an industrial bleach and must be treated as Corrosive (household stuff is just an irritant) which brings in extra safety rules, I believe. Most hospitals and schools have moved away from bleach based on Sodium Hypochlorite to a safer and equally effective disinfectant (Sodium Dichloroisocyanurate).

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaula View Post
    In the UK household bleaches are defined as <10% hyochlorite, anything higher counts as an industrial bleach and must be treated as Corrosive (household stuff is just an irritant) which brings in extra safety rules, I believe.
    Yes, that's what I was referring to - the change from >10% to <10% makes it considerably less hazardous, and reduces the number of restrictions on its use.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Well, that change was to stop it being unnecessarily hazardous.
    I'm just surprised because I saw (and smelt) hypochlorite bleach in use in a public place in the UK within the last couple of months. I'm guessing the restriction is a feature of your workplace, rather than some general rule.

    Grant Hutchison
    Yes it is still on sale in the UK and you will still find it in use. It is a restriction in our workplace, or possibly the cleaning contractor we use.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaula View Post
    In the UK household bleaches are defined as <10% hyochlorite, anything higher counts as an industrial bleach and must be treated as Corrosive (household stuff is just an irritant) which brings in extra safety rules, I believe. Most hospitals and schools have moved away from bleach based on Sodium Hypochlorite to a safer and equally effective disinfectant (Sodium Dichloroisocyanurate).
    It's a little disappointing that retail suppliers seem to have limited the concentration to 5%. From what you say they could still legally sell 9.9% concentration.

    I think they also use the dichloroisocyanurate as a solid to chlorinate private swimming pools? It's not something I have to worry about though...

  6. #36
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