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Thread: Parker Solar Probe

  1. #1
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    Parker Solar Probe

    The Parker Solar Probe will get very close to the Sun after 7 Venus flybys.
    Animated GIF: http://orbitsimulator.com/gravitySim...ns/parker2.gif
    Simulation that will run in your browser: http://orbitsimulator.com/gravitySim...7_parker2.html
    Still screen shot:

  2. #2
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    For those interested the launch countdown clock and mission overview can be found here. http://parkersolarprobe.jhuapl.edu/

  3. #3
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    The Planetary Society has an article on the Probe which will launch this weekend.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason...e-preview.html

    This weekend, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft leaves Earth on a mission to touch the Sun. Launch is currently scheduled for August 11 between 07:33 to 08:38 UTC (3:33 a.m. to 4:38 a.m. EDT).

    Parker Solar Probe, or Parker for short, will eventually swoop within an eighth of the distance between the Sun and Mercury to perform a direct survey of the corona, the Sun's outermost region. It has 4 science instruments that collect data from behind a heat shield that keeps the spacecraft operating at room temperature. The mission nominally lasts seven years, until 2025.

    There’s a lot to like about Parker, and you’re going to hear

  4. #4
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    Launch at 3:30 am was successful.

    Of course, as I have always heard, that the only way to safely get to the Sun was to go at......
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Launch at 3:30 am was successful.

    Of course, as I have always heard, that the only way to safely get to the Sun was to go at......
    Off season?

  6. #6
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    Dark?

  7. #7
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    Oh for the love of Henry Youngman...

    NIGHT!!!!

    The punchline is that you go at NIGHT!



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Oh for the love of Henry Youngman...

    NIGHT!!!!

    The punchline is that you go at NIGHT!



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    I thought it was an Aggie joke.

  9. #9
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    Parker Solar Probe | NASA, Parker Solar Probe (has a nice description of the spacecraft and its mission)

    The spacecraft's mission should cover 24 orbits, and it should do 7 flybys of Venus to shrink its orbit with gravity assists. Including its first orbit, the one it is in now. It should fly by Venus on October 2 and reach its first perihelion on November 5. It will be 36 solar radii away, and its final orbit configuration will have 9 solar radii as its perihelion distance. Its orbit will shrink with each Venus flyby until it gets into its final orbit configuration in 2024.

    The spacecraft will have a carbon-composite heat shield to protect itself against the Sun as it goes close by.

    It will probe the outer corona where it becomes the solar wind.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superluminal View Post
    I thought it was an Aggie joke.
    Oh yeah!
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  11. #11
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    The interesting and non-intuitive difficulty of getting to the Sun seems to be carelessly addressed by a number of media sources that show the probe coming from behind Venus for the purpose of redirecting the "sideways" motion to an inward motion. But from Tony's post and at least one Youtube animation, we can see the probe losing speed (and angular momentum) so it seems the probe will be directed toward an on-coming Venus, thus slowing it down and reducing its angular momentum. This gives Parker both a tighter perihelion and aphelion. Do I have this right? And, if so, is anyone else seeing the media stumbling with this?
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  12. #12
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    There is a strong possibility that NASA and China might cooperate in the future for specific scientific tasks associated with the sun,

    http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/201..._137390209.htm

    A Chinese scientist says the country's solar radio heliograph is likely to cooperate with NASA's recently launched Parker Solar Probe to study the Sun.

    The Chinese Spectral Radioheliograph (CSRH), built at Ming'antu, a radio quiet region in north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, consists of 100 antennas with different frequency spectra covering an area of 10 square km. It can monitor solar activities on a wide imaging resolution spectrum.

    According to Yan Yihua, president of Division E Sun and Heliosphere, International Astronomical Union, the observation range of the CSRH and the Parker Solar Probe will overlap and it's possible that the two will cooperate in the future for specific scientific tasks.

  13. #13
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    "Parker Solar Probe marks first mission milestones on voyage to Sun"

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Pa...o_Sun_999.html

    Just two days after launch on Aug. 11, 2018, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, NASA's Parker Solar Probe achieved several planned milestones toward full commissioning and operations, announced mission controllers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, in Laurel, Maryland.

    On Aug. 13, the high-gain antenna, which Parker Solar Probe uses to communicate high-rate science data to Earth, was released from locks which held it stable during launch. Controllers have also been monitoring the spacecraft as it autonomously uses its thrusters to remove (or "dump") momentum, which is part of the flight operations of the spacecraft. Managing momentum helps the spacecraft remain in a stable and optimal flight profile.

  14. #14
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    The Parker Solar Probe just completed the 1st of 7 flybuys of Venus.

    https://www.floridatoday.com/story/t...er/1512157002/

    Less than two months after rocketing from Cape Canaveral, a NASA solar probe on Wednesday winged past Venus to refine its path toward the sun.

    The morning flyby within about 1,500 miles of the second planet from the sun was the first of seven that the $1.5 billion Parker Solar Probe, which launched Aug. 12 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, will perform over seven years.

    “Venus is very important to us,” explained Nicola Fox, the mission’s project scientist from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, before the launch. “We use Venus to slow us down just a little bit, really to focus our orbit, almost like doing a little handbrake turn, and focusing us in towards sun.”
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