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Thread: Is Mars Too Dry for Life?

  1. #31
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    http://www.astronomy.com/news/2018/0...lions-of-years

    Was Mars a good place for life... millions of years ago and deep underground?

    Did we miss it?
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
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  2. #32
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    Brief repeat of news coming out today...

    https://phys.org/news/2018-10-mars-oxygen-life.html

    Mars could have enough molecular oxygen to support life, and scientists figured out where to find it

    October 22, 2018 by Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times

    Modern-day Mars may be more hospitable to oxygen-breathing life than previously thought. A new study suggests that salty water at or near the surface of the red planet could contain enough dissolved O2 to support oxygen-breathing microbes, and even more complex organisms such as sponges. "Nobody thought of Mars as a place where aerobic respiration would work because there is so little oxygen in the atmosphere," said Vlada Stamenkovic an Earth and planetary scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory who led the work. "What we're saying is it is possible that this planet that is so different from Earth could have given aerobic life a chance." As part of the report, Stamenkovic and his coauthors also identified which regions of Mars are most likely to contain brines with the greatest amounts of dissolved oxygen. This could help NASA and other space agencies plan where to send landers on future missions, they said. The work was published Monday in Nature Geoscience.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Brief repeat of news coming out today...

    https://phys.org/news/2018-10-mars-oxygen-life.html

    Mars could have enough molecular oxygen to support life, and scientists figured out where to find it

    October 22, 2018 by Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
    .
    Seems a bit desperate to me. Why evolve to use that tiny trace of O2 when there is all that perchlorate available?

  4. #34
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    A negative view on whether water is causing "seasonal dark flows" on Mars (revised version from early 2018)


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.09699

    Observational evidence for a dry dust-wind origin of Mars seasonal dark flows

    Mathieu Vincendon, Cédric Pilorget, John Carter, Aurélien Stcherbinine (Submitted on 29 Aug 2018 (v1), last revised 6 Dec 2018 (this version, v2))

    Seasonal flows on warm slopes, or recurring slope lineae, have been presented as a strong evidence for currently flowing water on Mars. This assumption was supported by a correlation between activity and warm temperatures, and by the spectral identification of hydrated salts. Here we first demonstrate that salts spectral identification is not robust, and that flow activity occurs on a wider range of seasons and slope orientations than previously thought, ruling out liquid water as a probable contributor. We then show that morphology and timing of flow activity is fully consistent with the removal and deposition of bright dust above darker underlying surfaces occurring notably in relation with seasonal dust storm activity. Mars recurring slope lineae are thus consistent with dust lifting and settling processes typical of present-day dry planet Mars.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #35
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    In Mars case a big thing that inhibits life is the radiation it gets. The only life that can exist I believe would have to be deep underground because the air pressure is somewhat thicker and higher temperatures as well as protection from the radiation. We have on Earth life forms that survive 1 km underground.

  6. #36
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    Water ice discovered far below north pole of Mars.

    "Newly discovered layers of ice buried a mile beneath Mars' north pole are the remnants of ancient polar ice sheets and could be one of the largest water reservoirs on the planet, according to scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Arizona."

    https://phys.org/news/2019-05-massiv...ry-window.html
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  7. #37
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    So what I'm getting is that the surface is too dry for life (makes sense, it's exposed to near-vacuum) but there are underground possibilities. Not high chances of life, but some chances. ("Never tell me the odds!")

    Time to send a drill probe.

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...act=mrc&uact=8 (pic from Pinocchio In Outer Space)
    Last edited by Noclevername; 2019-May-27 at 09:20 AM.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

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