Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Terraforming Mars... probably not, says new paper

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    535

    Unhappy Terraforming Mars... probably not, says new paper

    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    243
    This quotation from the abstract provides an important caveat. (Emphasis added)

    "we conclude that terraforming Mars is not possible using present-day technology."

    It's an interesting study in that it helps better define the scope of aspects of the terraforming challenge, but I don't recall any suggestion, in fiction or non-fiction, that present-day technology would ever be up to the task.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    535
    Yes, but the key element was the amount of CO2 on Mars with which terraforming could be accomplished. True about the tech, though.

    Nice infographic...

    https://phys.org/news/2018-07-mars-t...echnology.html
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    1,598
    Now if only we could find coal on Mars....nyuk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    47,483
    I remember the old game SimEarth had a terraform Mars scenario. IIRC, the first step for that was to lob several comets into the planet, to add water (if you added too many you ended up with a water world.). I almost wonder if something like might work, break-up some icy bodies (mine Saturn's rings?, comets?) to add volatiles. Of course, this isn't anything close to present-day technology.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I remember the old game SimEarth had a terraform Mars scenario. IIRC, the first step for that was to lob several comets into the planet, to add water (if you added too many you ended up with a water world.). I almost wonder if something like might work, break-up some icy bodies (mine Saturn's rings?, comets?) to add volatiles. Of course, this isn't anything close to present-day technology.
    The Isaac Asimov method of getting Saturn's icy minimoons, breaking them up, and sending them to Mars.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,879
    CO2 is deadly at high percentages anyway. Need something like lots of nitrogen and a stable fluorocarbon greenhouse gas.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    58
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    The Isaac Asimov method of getting Saturn's icy minimoons, breaking them up, and sending them to Mars.
    I remember reading that story many moons ago. (sorry, couldn't resist!)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    10,924
    Centaurs would be a better bet. Since they are not in stable orbits it wouldn't take as much to move them. 2060 Chiron looks to "become a short-period comet in about a million years," according to the wiki.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    34,688
    Would it be possible to build up another greenhouse gas? Say, methane?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,879
    There's been talk of using chlorofluorocarbon greenhouse gases on mars. We could probably get the temperature up. That leaves the problem of getting the pressure up to something breathable using something nontoxic. I haven't heard about any large nitrate or nitride deposits on mars. Oxygen can be had from chlorate, but chlorine is not nice.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •