View Poll Results: GW in 2100

Voters
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  • 1.5 degrees C or less

    5 23.81%
  • 2 degrees

    4 19.05%
  • 2.5 degrees

    3 14.29%
  • 3 degrees

    1 4.76%
  • 3.5 degrees

    2 9.52%
  • 4 deg\rees

    2 9.52%
  • 4.5 degrees

    0 0%
  • 5 degrees

    0 0%
  • 5.5 degrees

    1 4.76%
  • 6 degrees or more

    3 14.29%
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Results 121 to 128 of 128

Thread: Global warming in 2100

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    You have not mentioned the East side of Antarctica, glaciers moving faster, or did you? Maybe i missed it. It’s summer there now of course.
    Augh, yes, you are right. Saw it, read it, forgot about it. Will post if I get original article or someone beat me to it.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #122
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    You might be asked about this in a discussion of rising sea levels. Never thought about this issue.


    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1219133236.htm

    Why is sea level rising faster in some places along the US East Coast than others?

    Date: December 19, 2018
    Source: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

    Sea levels are rising globally from ocean warming and melting of land ice, but the seas aren't rising at the same rate everywhere. Sea levels have risen significantly faster in some US East Coast regions compared to others. A new study reveals why.

    The reason is a phenomenon called "post-glacial rebound," explains Chris Piecuch, lead author of a study published on Dec. 20, 2018, in the journal Nature. Essentially, land areas in the Northern Hemisphere that once were covered by mammoth ice sheets during the last Ice Age -- such as Canada and parts of the Northeast U.S. -- were weighed down like a trampoline with a boulder on it. At the same time, land around the periphery of the ice sheets -- along the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast, for example -- rose up. As the ice sheets melted from their peak at the Last Glacial Maximum 26,500 years ago, the weighed-down areas gradually rebounded, while the peripheral lands started sinking, creating sort of a see-saw effect. Even though the ice sheets had disappeared by 7,000 years ago, the see-sawing of post-glacial rebound continues to this day.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #123
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    Apr 2011
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    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
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    The same is happening along the English south coast and possibly all uk as the rebound continues, yet the Thames barrier may get breached sooner than it was designed for.
    https://21stcenturychallenges.org/the-thames-barrier/
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    The same is happening along the English south coast and possibly all uk as the rebound continues, yet the Thames barrier may get breached sooner than it was designed for.
    https://21stcenturychallenges.org/the-thames-barrier/
    Correction, it’s Scotland rising while southern England is sinking. Like a seesaw. So sea levels at the estuary are rising in a combined attack of land sinking and seas rising.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  5. #125
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    Not going to offer too much in the way of quotes, as the content of this article could be disturbing, but the concept would explain a lot. Kind of like a fire sale: Everything must go!


    https://phys.org/news/2019-01-climat...y-species.html

    Climate change: Effect on sperm could hold key to species extinction
    January 8, 2019 by Kris Sales, The Conversation

    QUOTES: Currently, we have a disturbingly limited knowledge of which biological traits are sensitive to climate change and therefore responsible for local extinctions. However, a potential candidate is male reproduction, because a range of medical and agricultural studies in warm blooded animals have shown that male infertility happens during heat stress.

    [[Article goes on to prove its point.]]

    LATE ADD: Occurs to me that this would almost completely explain insect extinctions, as the focus of the article is on the same.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2019-Jan-08 at 02:45 PM. Reason: add
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
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    8,275
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Not going to offer too much in the way of quotes, as the content of this article could be disturbing, but the concept would explain a lot. Kind of like a fire sale: Everything must go!


    https://phys.org/news/2019-01-climat...y-species.html

    Climate change: Effect on sperm could hold key to species extinction
    January 8, 2019 by Kris Sales, The Conversation

    QUOTES: Currently, we have a disturbingly limited knowledge of which biological traits are sensitive to climate change and therefore responsible for local extinctions. However, a potential candidate is male reproduction, because a range of medical and agricultural studies in warm blooded animals have shown that male infertility happens during heat stress.

    [[Article goes on to prove its point.]]

    LATE ADD: Occurs to me that this would almost completely explain insect extinctions, as the focus of the article is on the same.
    Not sure about insects, but many fish are sex-determination-sensitive to temperature, including some we like to eat.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    2
    Extra energy is retained by the planet and it results in the storm tracks being colder in the winter. Think about where are the storm tracks and how do their sfc temperature averages affect regional averages?

  8. #128
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    The February 25 issue of Chemical & Engineering news had a review article on the various technologies for carbon capture.

    LINK

    Enter “negative-emissions technologies,” a term but a few years old. NETs are methods that physically and chemically remove CO2 or other gases from the atmosphere. Today, a handful of technologies capture emitted CO2 before it ever reaches the atmosphere. NETs would extract CO2 or other gases directly from the air, change land-use practices to plant more carbon-sequestering trees and plants, and aggressively use natural systems to remove CO2 from the environment.

    NETs would not relieve the world of the need to cut emissions, but they could ease the path to reach net zero emissions by 2050—the timeline that the United Nations Environment Programme says is necessary to keep the global temperature rise below 2 C, the original goal of the Paris Agreement on climate change.

    Emission cuts and NETs “are two tools in the same toolbox,” says Stephen Pacala, an ecology and environmental biology professor at Princeton University who chaired a 2018 US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine study of NETs. “They both are necessary and are likely to coexist for a long, long time.”

    In the following sections, C&EN examines some NET approaches that are just getting underway. Whether they will be able to scale up to meet the need is an open question. The numbers are staggering: globally, nearly 50 billion metric tons (t) of greenhouse gases are emitted to the atmosphere annually, the UN Environment Programme estimates. Of those emissions, about 37 billion t is CO2 and the rest is mostly methane. And even with various efforts in place to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, global CO2 emissions increased by nearly 3% in 2018.
    The technologies that are discussed are air capture, bioenergy, mineralization, geological sequestration, and planting of plants.
    Last edited by Swift; 2019-Mar-15 at 08:16 PM.
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