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Thread: Soyuz Emergency landing.

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    Soyuz Emergency landing.

    I was laughing at the new reporter on the RT channel talking about the launch about to happen while the rocket was climbing above his shoulder. Now an hour later I see it had to make an emergency landing. That has not happened for decades! Both crew safe. Nice to know the escape system is always ready!

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    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45822845

    Astronauts escape malfunctioning Soyuz rocket

    (Pete, I took the liberty of making the thread title a little bit more descriptive, so we won’t get multiple threads on it today..)

    Newsstories say cosmonauts are OK, rescue teams are in contact and on their way, arrival at landing spot may take an hour.

    Is this the first ever succesfully aborted manned launch?
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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45822845

    Astronauts escape malfunctioning Soyuz rocket

    (Pete, I took the liberty of making the thread title a little bit more descriptive, so we won’t get multiple threads on it today..)

    Newsstories say cosmonauts are OK, rescue teams are in contact and on their way, arrival at landing spot may take an hour.

    Is this the first ever succesfully aborted manned launch?
    As far as I recall, it is.

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    Stephen Clark, via Spaceflight Now reports there was at least one other, in 1975:

    Quote Originally Posted by Spaceflight Now
    The last inflight failure of a crewed Soyuz rocket was the Soyuz 18 on 5 April 1975. In that case the Soyuz aborted at T+295 seconds. The crew, which was headed to the Salyut 4 space station, experienced 21 G during descent their descent but landed safely.
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    I think there were two before this one. Will check. Both were Soyuz.
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    Soyuz Emergency landing.

    Three aborts including this one says Wikipedia. One was on the pad in 1983 and the only one to use the launch escape system. The others aborted in flight.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soyuz_...es?wprov=sfti1


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    The following three Soyuz missions either aborted on the pad or during ascent to orbit.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soyuz_7K-T_No.39

    [deleted]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soyuz_7K-ST_No._16L

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soyuz_MS-10


    The following Space Shuttle mission underwent an abort to orbit.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-51-F
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-11 at 02:56 PM.
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    Soyuz 33 was an aborted mission; they had already completed 31 orbits before the decision was made to return the crew to Earth.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soyuz_33?wprov=sfti1



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    Last edited by schlaugh; 2018-Oct-11 at 02:16 PM. Reason: added number of orbits

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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Soyuz 33 was an aborted mission; they had already completed 31 orbits before the decision was made to return the crew to Earth.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soyuz_33?wprov=sfti1
    Oops!
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    Remember a few years ago when in 1 week we had an airliner going down into the Hudson and an offshore crew helicopter going down in sea, without any people dying? Today we had a Soyuz failing at launch and an F16 blowing up on the ground, with only 1 minor injury. Every now and then, all the bad things happen at once yet turn out OK. I hope they find a clear cause for the failure. Thumbs up for the emergency procedures!

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    I am glad they are safe, this was the kind of accident people were worried about after the Progress problems in 2011.
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    It is really great and important there were no fatalities.

    The travelers' pulse rates must have shot up when they were jostled. I know they're made of the right stuff so it's all in a day's work but being on world TV live within hours is surreal and they did seem a bit bewildered. lol.

    I don't know how much this will hurt Russia and its space endeavours. Surely Soyuz manned launches will be put on hold for a while and, by the time they're ready to resume, SpaceX and Boeing will be close to offering their own products. Tough spot.

    Maybe this is a good time for Russia to get their space stuff in order. The space launch industry is being revolutionized by the likes of Spacex, Blue Origin and others. Maybe Roscosmos can be the first important space agency to abandon the old paradigms and head in this new direction. There are many reasons it won't happen.

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    I do wonder if there will be a period of time that the ISS is unmanned. If the Russian fleet is grounded for an extended period of time, and the SpaceX and Boeing capsules aren't manned-rated yet, we could have a period of time with no manned launches. How long will the current crew stay without replacement?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I do wonder if there will be a period of time that the ISS is unmanned. If the Russian fleet is grounded for an extended period of time, and the SpaceX and Boeing capsules aren't manned-rated yet, we could have a period of time with no manned launches. How long will the current crew stay without replacement?
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    I'm shocked to hear that the early mission escape system actually worked as intended.
    Ever since the Mercury missions I've thought the things looked awfully dicey; more for show than actual use.
    Congrats to the Engineers, who apparently know a bit more about the systems than I do.
    Still, I wish the Russians would get their rocket QC problems under control. Trouble with unmanned missions is bad, but now we're seeing rockets unfit for human spaceflight.
    Last edited by Squink; 2018-Oct-11 at 07:12 PM.

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    From the reports I read, they state things like "the capsule separated from the rocket" but it's unclear to me whether or not the escape tower was used to achieve that. Alternative separation method uses the capsule's engines instead of the tower.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2018-Oct-11 at 07:14 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    it's unclear to me whether or not the escape tower was used to achieve that or not.
    Ah, maybe explosive bolts where enough.

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    I thought the escape tower jetted before the abort.

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    Soyuz Emergency landing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    I thought the escape tower jetted before the abort.
    It did at about +120 seconds. Booster failure was very shortly thereafter.


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    Last edited by schlaugh; 2018-Oct-11 at 08:31 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I do wonder if there will be a period of time that the ISS is unmanned. If the Russian fleet is grounded for an extended period of time, and the SpaceX and Boeing capsules aren't manned-rated yet, we could have a period of time with no manned launches. How long will the current crew stay without replacement?

    National Geographic:


    The crew's descent vehicle, which has been docked at the station since June, has an orbital lifetime of roughly 200 days. On paper, it would need to return to Earth no later than Christmas.

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    Last edited by BetaDust; 2018-Oct-11 at 09:43 PM. Reason: Links do not work....
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetaDust View Post
    National Geographic:





    -- Dennis
    Even if the Soyuz booster is temporarily not man-rated during the investigation, couldn't it still be used to boost a replacement, empty standby Soyuz to the ISS so they have a spaceworthy lifeboat?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I do wonder if there will be a period of time that the ISS is unmanned. If the Russian fleet is grounded for an extended period of time, and the SpaceX and Boeing capsules aren't manned-rated yet, we could have a period of time with no manned launches.
    Apparently they would work hard to avoid that. I read that NASA estimates that if the ISS is unmanned for six months, there is a ten percent chance they would lose it, because some glitch would happen and there would be nobody there to fix it.


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    I gotta say, after years of following the space program, the Russian Soyuz/R-7/whatever is probably the best booster ever made. Hundred and hundreds of launches, failure rate is way down. If something goes wrong, that's NOT normal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Apparently they would work hard to avoid that. I read that NASA estimates that if the ISS is unmanned for six months, there is a ten percent chance they would lose it, because some glitch would happen and there would be nobody there to fix it.


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    Hmm. Depending on a single launch vehicle for access for 8 years doesn't seem to working out.

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    The launch failure has highlighted that Russia is the only option for the US to get into space currently. The report acknowledges China as an alternative but dismisses it with the comment "China has successfully put its astronauts into orbit, but its space program is still in relative infancy."

    https://www.rferl.org/a/soyuz-mishap.../29540427.html

    Soyuz Mishap A Reminder There's No Alternative To Russia's Manned Space Vehicles -- For Now
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    I’m going to guess that the Chinese craft isn’t certified as “man rated” by NASA. Not that it couldn’t, but that could take a long time and require the Chinese space agency to divulge info they might not want to divulge.

    I’d guess there could be docking issues, too.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I’m going to guess that the Chinese craft isn’t certified as “man rated” by NASA. Not that it couldn’t, but that could take a long time and require the Chinese space agency to divulge info they might not want to divulge.
    I would go so far as to say, SpaceX will reach NASA human-rated standards before a Chinese vessel will... Not out of any lack of technical skill on the part of China's space program, but because of that very reluctance to share information and responsibility, as well as the complexity of US/China relations.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I’m going to guess that the Chinese craft isn’t certified as “man rated” by NASA. Not that it couldn’t, but that could take a long time and require the Chinese space agency to divulge info they might not want to divulge.

    I’d guess there could be docking issues, too.


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    Read somewhere that the Chinese docking mechanism was compatible with the Russian one.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I’m going to guess that the Chinese craft isn’t certified as “man rated” by NASA. Not that it couldn’t, but that could take a long time and require the Chinese space agency to divulge info they might not want to divulge.

    I’d guess there could be docking issues, too.
    For all we know it's possible - not likely, but possible - that the CNSA has quietly reached out to NASA to see if it could offer its services. Stranger things have happened.

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