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Thread: Live beings caught in Quantum Entanglement? Seriously?

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Live beings caught in Quantum Entanglement? Seriously?

    HOLD THE BUS. Wait a second. Is this even possible? What is going on?


    https://www.sciencealert.com/scienti...m-entanglement

    Living Organisms May Have Been Put in Quantum Entanglement For First Time, Study Claims

    DAN ROBITZSKI, FUTURISM ... 30 OCT 2018

    A few years ago, the journal Small published a study showing how photosynthetic bacteria could absorb and release photons as the light bounced across a minuscule gap between two mirrors. Now, a retroactive look at the study's data published in The Journal of Physics Communications suggests something more may have been going on.

    The bacteria may have been the first living organisms to operate in the realm of quantum physics, becoming entangled with the bouncing light at the quantum scale.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

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    More.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...ogy-milestone/

    "Schrödinger's Bacterium" Could Be a Quantum Biology Milestone
    A recent experiment may have placed living organisms in a state of quantum entanglement

    By Jonathan O'Callaghan on October 29, 2018

    ==============================

    The original article.


    http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10...28/aae224/meta

    Journal of Physics Communications
    Letter • The following article is OPEN ACCESS

    Entanglement between living bacteria and quantized light witnessed by Rabi splitting

    C Marletto1, D M Coles2, T Farrow1 and V Vedral1,3,4

    Published 10 October 2018 • © 2018 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd
    Journal of Physics Communications, Volume 2, Number 10

    Abstract: We model recent experiments on living sulphur bacteria interacting with quantised light, using the Dicke model. Our analysis shows that the strong coupling between the bacteria and the light, when both are treated quantum-mechanically, indicates that in those experiments there is entanglement between the bacteria (modelled as dipoles) and the quantised light (modelled as a single quantum harmonic oscillator). The existence of lower polariton branch due to the vacuum Rabi splitting, measured in those experiments for a range of different parameters, ensures the negativity of energy (with respect to the lowest energy of separable states), thus acting as an entanglement witness.

    Witnessing quantum effects in living systems was long considered an impossible task, even by the pioneers of quantum theory, such as Bohr [1]. Recent advances in theoretical and experimental techniques, however, are bringing us closer to accomplishing it. Entanglement has extensively been investigated, and even detected, in various many-body systems [2]. Since living systems are (most probably) special cases of many-body systems, they can (presumably) be analysed with the same methods. In this paper we model recently performed experiments where living sulphur bacteria are entangled with a quantised field of light [3]. This is particularly exciting, since the quantised nature of light was at the heart of the complementarity that Bohr thought would ultimately make it impossible for us to detect quantum effects in a living entity. We also offer an argument that semi-classical models would be insufficient to explain the experiments' results.


    "I knew this was going to happen." -- Dr. Manhattan.
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    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-31 at 04:02 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

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    I suspect "modelled as dipoles" is a significant phrase here. At best, a particular simple property of the bacteria was placed in an entangled state.

    Grant Hutchison
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I suspect "modelled as dipoles" is a significant phrase here. At best, a particular simple property of the bacteria was placed in an entangled state.
    But isn't that what they mean when they say that two particles are entangled?

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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    But isn't that what they mean when they say that two particles are entangled?
    Sure is. So the "living beings" aspect isn't particularly relevant, except insofar as it is a measure of scale and the potential for decoherence.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2018-Oct-31 at 05:56 PM.
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    In a larger sense, certain information from the body of a living being can be transmitted to another object or body over an unlimited distance, but not faster than the speed of light. Correct so far? And the information can be deciphered, perhaps providing some indication of the state of the living being so linked?
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    In a larger sense, certain information from the body of a living being can be transmitted to another object or body over an unlimited distance, but not faster than the speed of light. Correct so far? And the information can be deciphered, perhaps providing some indication of the state of the living being so linked?
    Like a heart rate monitor, for instance?
    (But you can't transmit information using entanglement.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2018-Oct-31 at 10:45 PM.
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    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

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    Curious if quantum entanglement can be used to build quantum computers inside a person's molecules.


    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-closer...portation.html

    One step closer to complex quantum teleportation

    November 5, 2018, University of Vienna

    The experimental mastery of complex quantum systems is required for future technologies like quantum computers and quantum encryption. Scientists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have broken new ground. They sought to use more complex quantum systems than two-dimensionally entangled qubits and thus can increase the information capacity with the same number of particles. The developed methods and technologies could in the future enable the teleportation of complex quantum systems. The results of their work, "Experimental Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entanglement beyond qubits," is published recently in the renowned journal Nature Photonics. Similar to bits in conventional computers, qubits are the smallest unit of information in quantum systems. Big companies like Google and IBM are competing with research institutes around the world to produce an increasing number of entangled qubits and develop a functioning quantum computer. But a research group at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences is pursuing a new path to increase the information capacity of complex quantum systems.

    The idea behind it is simple: Instead of just increasing the number of particles involved, the complexity of each system is increased. "The special thing about our experiment is that for the first time, it entangles three photons beyond the conventional two-dimensional nature," explains Manuel Erhard, first author of the study. For this purpose, the Viennese physicists used quantum systems with more than two possible states—in this particular case, the angular momentum of individual light particles. These individual photons now have a higher information capacity than qubits. However, the entanglement of these light particles turned out to be difficult on a conceptual level. The researchers overcame this challenge with a groundbreaking idea: a computer algorithm that autonomously searches for an experimental implementation. With the help of a computer algorithm called Melvin, the researchers found an experimental setup to produce this type of entanglement. At first, this was very complex, but it worked in principle. After some simplifications, the physicists still faced major technological challenges. The team was able to solve these with state-of-the-art laser technology and a specially developed multi-port. "This multi-port is the heart of our experiment, and combines the three photons so that they are entangled in three dimensions," explains Manuel Erhard.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

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