Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Innuendo appears to spark conspiracy theories (finger quotes) "Implying that..."

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,359

    Exclamation Innuendo appears to spark conspiracy theories (finger quotes) "Implying that..."

    The implications are awful, but pretty obvious in daily life and likely already understood by many. I will be careful what I say about this news, except that I would like for it to be replicated.


    https://phys.org/news/2018-10-innuen...-theories.html

    Innuendo alone can fuel conspiracy theories, research shows
    October 16, 2018, University of Exeter

    Innuendo alone in news coverage can fuel belief in conspiracy theories, according to a new study. Newspaper articles and TV and radio broadcasts which imply coincidences and connections are enough to lead people to believe false information, experts have found. The University of Exeter study shows conspiracy theories can be spread unwittingly as well as deliberately—for instance by quoting people who question the motives of institutions and corporations—a finding which has implications for how news outlets cover controversial topics. Conspiracy theories suggested implicitly are especially dangerous because they are harder to spot and challenge. The study recommends journalists should avoid including "errant data" that may be misconstrued when there is uncertainty about facts during rapidly developing news events. This implicit method of the spreading of misinformation has been largely overlooked until now. The study shows correcting false information is possible if the belief in the conspiracy theory hasn't become ingrained.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    335
    Interdasting...
    Shadilay

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,808
    I suppose it is an inexpensive and lazy way for news outlets to try to conjure up news interest.
    Formerly Frog march.

    Newscaster: ... But I've just had a report that a representative of Disaster Area met with the environmentalists this morning and had them all shot, so now nothing stands in the way of the concert going ahead this afternoon on this beautiful sunny day.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    259
    Quote Originally Posted by WaxRubiks View Post
    I suppose it is an inexpensive and lazy way for news outlets to try to conjure up news interest.
    Was that a very clever way of demonstrating the concept revealed by the research, or were you just not thinking straight?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,808
    Quote Originally Posted by Eclogite View Post
    Was that a very clever way of demonstrating the concept revealed by the research, or were you just not thinking straight?
    well, what is wrong with the idea that news outlets might do this to drum up an audience, without spending much money?
    I'm sure there are other reasons they might do this. Perhaps you can suggest some reasons...
    Formerly Frog march.

    Newscaster: ... But I've just had a report that a representative of Disaster Area met with the environmentalists this morning and had them all shot, so now nothing stands in the way of the concert going ahead this afternoon on this beautiful sunny day.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    35,520
    It's good that there's science to back this up. Not that it wasn't obvious, but having it supported by research makes it easier to counter.... assuming news viewers, advertisers, and media corporations will listen over the sound of easy money.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    8,116
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    The implications are awful, but pretty obvious in daily life and likely already understood by many. I will be careful what I say about this news, except that I would like for it to be replicated.


    https://phys.org/news/2018-10-innuen...-theories.html

    Innuendo alone can fuel conspiracy theories, research shows
    October 16, 2018, University of Exeter

    Innuendo alone in news coverage can fuel belief in conspiracy theories, according to a new study. Newspaper articles and TV and radio broadcasts which imply coincidences and connections are enough to lead people to believe false information, experts have found. The University of Exeter study shows conspiracy theories can be spread unwittingly as well as deliberately—for instance by quoting people who question the motives of institutions and corporations—a finding which has implications for how news outlets cover controversial topics. Conspiracy theories suggested implicitly are especially dangerous because they are harder to spot and challenge. The study recommends journalists should avoid including "errant data" that may be misconstrued when there is uncertainty about facts during rapidly developing news events. This implicit method of the spreading of misinformation has been largely overlooked until now. The study shows correcting false information is possible if the belief in the conspiracy theory hasn't become ingrained.

    I haven't read the article, but I would say that avoiding such data (I don't have any examples of such yet, so maybe) could reduce the development of critical thinking skills. That's another long-term effect ...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,359
    I managed to track down the origins of some minor conspiracy theories (political ones, I will not name them or discuss them here), and I was surprised to find that disproving them was not that difficult. One theory I had personally held turned out to be completely bogus. Shocked the heck out of me. I had completely fallen for it thanks to [drum roll] reading stuff that had jumped to conclusions because the truthful part of the news had appeared mildly unfavorable.

    I'm will watch what I read from now on, and definitely watch what I say to others.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,359
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    It's good that there's science to back this up. Not that it wasn't obvious, but having it supported by research makes it easier to counter.... assuming news viewers, advertisers, and media corporations will listen over the sound of easy money.
    We have to do it, as no one else can be expected to do it. That's really why I want this research replicated as much as possible.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,772
    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    I haven't read the article, but I would say that avoiding such data (I don't have any examples of such yet, so maybe) could reduce the development of critical thinking skills. That's another long-term effect ...
    If you're getting your news from click-bait media, you've already declared your willingness to avoid critical thinking.

    Traditional investigative journalism strictly avoids innuendo (that's for opinion pieces and editorials) and seeks to apply critical thinking and evidence to the news it reports. Trouble is, traditional investigative journalism is expensive to do, and it is being driven to the wall by the blogosphere and social media - cheap, sparkly content that seems like it's free, because it monetizes its readers in other ways. (In The Death Of The Gods Carl Miller calls this churnalism, though IIRC he didn't coin the word himself, but got it from a weary investigative journalist.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,808
    good journalism is expensive in itself, but the media organisation can also run the risk of being sued by people/organisations who do not want to be investigated by decent journalists.
    Formerly Frog march.

    Newscaster: ... But I've just had a report that a representative of Disaster Area met with the environmentalists this morning and had them all shot, so now nothing stands in the way of the concert going ahead this afternoon on this beautiful sunny day.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    10,969
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Innuendo alone can fuel conspiracy theories, research shows
    Should have read "Critical thinking flies out the door when conspiracies come innuendo."

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,359
    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Should have read "Critical thinking flies out the door when conspiracies come innuendo."
    Yes.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •