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Thread: The Cat Thread

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    When I was a kid we thought our cat was female until we took him to the vet. We didn't need to change the mode of address, however, because he was always just "cat".

    Grant Hutchison
    We have a white-and-orange creamsickle shorthair who started off life named Mister Cat, but we renamed him Tachyon.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    We have a largish (15-16 lb.) silver and white Maine Coon named Sophie Cleese,
    My understanding is that Maine Coons only came in three sizes: largish, really largish, and "oh my god, is that a lynx?".
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    We have a white-and-orange creamsickle shorthair who started off life named Mister Cat, but we renamed him Tachyon.
    I assume he never slows down.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    We have a white-and-orange creamsickle shorthair who started off life named Mister Cat, but we renamed him Tachyon.
    Ours never really had a capital letter, let alone an honorific. It didn't seem to bother him.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    My understanding is that Maine Coons only came in three sizes: largish, really largish, and "oh my god, is that a lynx?".
    To our surprise, our smallest cat is a Maine Coon female named Serendipity (originally Lucky) who escaped being euthanized twice before we snagged her from a rescue society. Dip, as we call her now, is under 10 lbs., and we cannot figure out how that happened. Pleasant mannered but unexpectedly fierce if another cat gets in her way. She's smacked everyone at this point. The other cats don't bother her, just let her be. Giant attitude, small package.

    On the other hand, I've seen videos of GIANT Maine Coons that give me nightmares, cats that the owners can barely lift with both hands. I mean, jeez Louise.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I assume he never slows down.
    See, that was why I named him Tachyon when we got him, assuming he would be the fast one. It turned out that he lived up to his name because he could not be found. He hid everywhere, in places we'd never imagined a cat would fit, until he got used to us.

    He and his half sister, the silvery Sophie Cleese (look nothing alike) were rescued when a neighbor of the original owner took charge of all his cats after he (the owner) went into hospice unexpectedly. His family refused all of his pets, and the neighbor came to my wife's store begging someone to take in some of the pets. We got the two cats and their paperwork (wrongly calling Sophie a boy), then the owner died the next day. It was a shock, but we were glad we were there.

    Tachyon and Sophie were apparently used to being petted and stroked as they ate. Both of them are experts at luring us to their food bowls, then staring at us until we rub and scratch their backs so they can start eating. I feel like some kind of peasant serf butler.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    My understanding is that Maine Coons only came in three sizes: largish, really largish, and "oh my god, is that a lynx?".
    Selection of entirely too large Maine Coons.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=larg...w=1920&bih=911
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Christmas/Chanukah tree tied to a hook in the ceiling so it cannot be knocked over.
    I feel your pain. We're having to start again next week gradually breaking things in with the bottom half of the artificial tree, wait a day and see who climbs, add the top half, wait a day, add some ornaments, see which ones are on the floor 2 hours later, see where we can put guy lines...
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  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Selection of entirely too large Maine Coons.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=larg...w=1920&bih=911
    Yikes! Some of them look like lions.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by ngc3314 View Post
    I feel your pain. We're having to start again next week gradually breaking things in with the bottom half of the artificial tree, wait a day and see who climbs, add the top half, wait a day, add some ornaments, see which ones are on the floor 2 hours later, see where we can put guy lines...
    Two of our (now) eight cats are climbers, and one of them likes to bolt across the room before throwing herself into the tree to try to knock it down (The Dipster, the tiny Maine Coon). Lately we keep tallies of how many ornaments are knocked out of the tree per day, with the record being over a dozen, two years ago.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ngc3314 View Post
    gorgeous green-eyed cat
    Excellent! We have pix like this one of the tree climbers.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  12. #42
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    Sophie Cleese, ex-Sophocles, staring at me while I tried to assemble a rocket model earlier this year.
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    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  13. #43
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    An attractive piece of decorative roadkill we use to spice up the house. Leave it on the back of the sofa, serves as a conversation starter and pretzel-bowl holder.

    Thanks to our ragdoll mix Midnight, who posed for the image.
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    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  14. #44
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    First time our new cat, Percy (a.k.a. Perseus Jet, Purse, Perse, Oh You Adorable Thing, Not Cleopatra Anymore, etc.) got to eat with one of our Big Cats, Midnight the Insane Ninja Cat.

    Some hissing from Midnight and other cats, but it went well anyway. Midnight on left (rear view), Perseus on right.
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    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  15. #45
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    This thread reminds me of a neighbor who had a sign on her front door which said, "Dogs have masters; cats have servants." Usually there was a cat standing watch on the porch.

  16. #46
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    This is Ranger Roger, an unpaid indentured serf "volunteer" writing from inside a unique zoological habitat, the Thibeau-Moore Undomesticated Free-ranging Indoor Feline Enclosure in upstate South Carolina. This facility, formerly a home with seven cats and two people, is now a private wildlife center with eight cats and two unpaid indentured serf "volunteers" (UISVs).

    Feeding time was at 6:35 a.m., and was it exciting! Undomesticated feline Blizzard, so named because of her white coloration and her howling for food, announced the feeding from the second that the morning alarm went off. The UISVs began feeding soft food to free-ranging indoor felines Blizzard and Serendipity on the living room table, mortal enemies Bandit and Sophie on opposite sides of the table on the floor, Midnight on the TV stand, Tachyon on the infinity-style scratching post, Cinnamon Sundae in the kitchen on the floor, and new arrival Perseus Jet on the kitchen counter. Once feeding time was over, a massive cleanup effort was launched by me, Ranger Roger, while wife got dressed for work. Percy was allowed to wander a little until the hissing from the other undomesticated felines became too intense, then he was removed to his private room in the bathroom with the nonfunctional tub. He gets personal visits there all day long from the staff.

    The attached photo shows hunger siren Blizzard, whose narrow-eyed glare is her most feared weapon. At the moment this 15.5-year-old she-devil is only staring, but that look could change at any second to an expression of disgust, jealousy, or even annoyance.

    More to come.
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    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  17. #47
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    A bit off-topic, but I'm slightly perturbed that at least two of my fellow CQ'ers are already doing Christmas Trees.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Selection of entirely too large Maine Coons.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=larg...w=1920&bih=911
    This one, of course, is a famous Photoshop job and not a Maine Coon at all. Lots of forced perspective going on in those as well.

    I've long wanted a Maine Coon but my wife decided on Ragdolls so Ragdolls it is. That's another largish breed but one of ours is quite small at only 8.5 pounds. The other is over 12.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    A bit off-topic, but I'm slightly perturbed that at least two of my fellow CQ'ers are already doing Christmas Trees.
    "Slightly perturbed"? I've been having post-traumatic flashbacks after reading those posts.

    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  20. #50
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Chuck, with his toilet roll art

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    Andy, enjoying the sun

  21. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    A bit off-topic, but I'm slightly perturbed that at least two of my fellow CQ'ers are already doing Christmas Trees.
    Not off-topic at all. We leave our tree up all year, without decorations most of the time, because it keeps the cats occupied hiding under or in it.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  22. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    This is Ranger Roger.....
    Apologies. It's just that with the addition of the eighth cat, things here are more like a zoo than a house. Just need to stay calm and feed cats and take my meds.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  23. #53
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    Notes on Percy, the new cat:

    Aside from his presence making the largest and oldest cats we have Very Hissy, Percy's been great. Rather fearless, loves exploring, very outgoing, loves people.

    Given that he was/is feral but still loves people, I can only suppose he was well loved and cared for by people in the vicinity of the CVS store and apartment complex where he was found. He does love eating human food, meaning anything on a plate within nose distance of him, even if you are eating it. He moves right in and starts eating until grabbed and put on the floor. We don't allow eating human food for our cats. He probably got a lot of food from locals and ate from garbage cans. He is somewhat intimidated by other cats, but not too much so. He does get around.

    He can also, delicately put, fill a litter box in no time. He eats voluminously of the hard cat food, anywhere he can find it in any other cat's bowl.

    Doing well, in short. Good kid.

    Oddly, he does not hide. Some of our older cats used to hide when upset. Not Percy.
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    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Nov-18 at 04:39 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  24. #54
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    Sounds like you have quite a handful with Percy. Hopefully the other cats will come to accept him.

  25. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Sounds like you have quite a handful with Percy. Hopefully the other cats will come to accept him.
    He smells a lot better now that he's had a bath. Next time he gets a bath, two people (not one) will give it.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  26. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    ...because he was always just "cat".
    Our cats have names, and I use them sometimes, but I fairly frequently just refer to them as "cat". I recall once saying "Hello, cat" as I walked past one of them, and then "Hello, other cat" to the second one nearby, followed by "Hello, other other cat" when the third made an appearance, apparently upset that I hadn't acknowledged him as well. My children apparently found this a sufficiently amusing way to refer to the cats that they still mention it from time to time.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  27. #57
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    This afternoon I briefly went out the deck door of the new house to do something. The cat on the adjacent chair was astounded. "Hey, that glass wall OPENS!" Now I'm really going to have to watch it. She'll never forget.

    I'm generally really pleased, however, at how the kitties have adjusted to being moved.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  28. #58
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    SCIECNE! and your cat's tongue, the best cleaner ever.

    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-scoop-...ngue-deep.html

    The scoop on how your cat's sandpapery tongue deep cleans
    November 19, 2018 by Lauran Neergaard

    Cat lovers know when kitties groom, their tongues are pretty scratchy. Using high-tech scans and some other tricks, scientists are learning how those sandpapery tongues help cats get clean and stay cool. The secret: Tiny hooks that spring up on the tongue—with scoops built in to carry saliva deep into all that fur.

    A team of mechanical engineers reported the findings Monday, and say they're more than a curiosity. They could lead to inventions for pets and people. "Their tongue could help us apply fluids, or clean carpets, or apply medicine" to hairy skin, said Georgia Tech lead researcher Alexis Noel, who is seeking a patent for a 3D-printed, tongue-inspired brush.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  29. #59
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    Nice, though I am reminded of this old bit from Steve Martin
    You know how they say you shouldn't give your cat a bath. Well, the other day he came home and he was really dirty, and so I gave my cat a bath... and he loved it. He sat there, he enjoyed it, it was fun for me. The fur would stick to my tongue, but other than that...
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  30. #60
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    I took this cat to a few cat shows. The judges loved him: Grand Premier* Saga Hot Spot....

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    ____________________
    * Grand Premier (GP, GRP, GPR, or Gr. Pr.): In most North American associations, this title is the rough equivalent of Grand Champion for cats shown in the Premiership class.
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

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