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Thread: Why can't a school build its own Stonehenge?

  1. #1
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    Question Why can't a school build its own Stonehenge?

    (Because parents will think it leads to druidism.) No, no, no, seriously.

    Why not build a Stonehenge-type science park at a science-magnet school? There seem to be innumerable stories online about how to do it, including one about one man who is building one by himself once he figured out how easy it was.

    https://www.asme.org/engineering-top...simple-diy-job

    A more general guide would ne more like the following simple Stonehenge:

    https://www.aboutstonehenge.info/bui...wn-stonehenge/

    It would be a great place for night observing groups to meet. You would not really need big rocks, just vertical metal or wooden poles in the ground with a central viewing site. You'd have to keep the area well lit at night when not used to discourage local people (and kids) from abusing the site.

    A big, complicated Stonehenge ("Bar-henge"?) could be used to track the movements of planets along the Zodiac, significant stars, constellations by season, the Moon and Sun, eclipses, and whatever else the real one could do.

    Any pro- and con- on this? I would be in favor of it, though it might be better on external private property that could be visited by science classes and used by astronomy clubs.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #2
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    As a possible guide to what such a little park could include, a book like Stonehenge Complete (Fourth Edition), by Christopher Chippindale, would help. I was started on the Stonehenge habit by Stonehenge Decoded when I was a kid.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    (Because parents will think it leads to druidism.) No, no, no, seriously.

    Why not build a Stonehenge-type science park at a science-magnet school? There seem to be innumerable stories online about how to do it, including one about one man who is building one by himself once he figured out how easy it was.

    https://www.asme.org/engineering-top...simple-diy-job

    A more general guide would ne more like the following simple Stonehenge:

    https://www.aboutstonehenge.info/bui...wn-stonehenge/

    It would be a great place for night observing groups to meet. You would not really need big rocks, just vertical metal or wooden poles in the ground with a central viewing site. You'd have to keep the area well lit at night when not used to discourage local people (and kids) from abusing the site.

    A big, complicated Stonehenge ("Bar-henge"?) could be used to track the movements of planets along the Zodiac, significant stars, constellations by season, the Moon and Sun, eclipses, and whatever else the real one could do.

    Any pro- and con- on this? I would be in favor of it, though it might be better on external private property that could be visited by science classes and used by astronomy clubs.
    I know someone who did, Robin Heath, he wrote a book about it and his theories of how to use the aubry (sp?)holes. He used students with simple props to demonstrate it although his ideas might be controversial. That was years ago now. I noted the interpretation shop used to sell his little book but then stopped. Archeologists maintained that no early group could possibly know how to predict eclipses as opposed to equinoxes, but his method did work, maybe a coinicidence? ( I have not searched for him to answer this.)
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  4. #4
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    Oh! That's what I was thinking of, the Aubrey holes! (Thank you!)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aubrey_holes

    This Wiki article mentioned Gerald Hawkins's Stonehenge Decoded, which gave me the idea that lunar eclipses could be tracked using the Aubrey holes.

    Building a scholastic Stonehenge would also involved engineering and math students, I realize. Could be fun.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #5
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    Just remember to bring your Pict and shovel...

  6. #6
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    I think this one was polystyrene covered in cement.

    https://www.stonehenge-aotearoa.co.nz/
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  7. #7
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    Child labor laws, mostly...

    Solfe

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