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Thread: Strong gravitational lens chain

  1. #1
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    Strong gravitational lens chain

    Gravitational lenses, caused by intervening galaxies or clusters, make very distant objects appear larger and closer (and distorted shape-wise) than they would otherwise appear. Has a "double" gravitational lens ever been viewed or searched for? That is, two gravitational lenses, one after the other, in sequence?
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

  2. #2
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    Here is one example of a galaxy producing lensed arcs of two background sources at different distances, sought to provide mass estimates at multiple radii.

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    I think Cougar is looking for a sort of gravitational compound lens?

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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    I think Cougar is looking for a sort of gravitational compound lens?
    Isn't that what we see in ngc3314's link?

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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Isn't that what we see in ngc3314's link?
    No, Grapes is right. That link references multiple background objects at different distances that are lensed by a single massive galaxy. I'm wondering about a single background object lensed by one distant, massive galaxy, then lensed again by another less distant, massive galaxy. As Grapes says, "a gravitational compound lens."
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    No, Grapes is right. That link references multiple background objects at different distances that are lensed by a single massive galaxy. I'm wondering about a single background object lensed by one distant, massive galaxy, then lensed again by another less distant, massive galaxy. As Grapes says, "a gravitational compound lens."
    Ah, OK. So if the middle galaxy was also massive (as with the foreground galaxy), you'd have what you're looking for.

  7. #7
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    To be sure you'd have to know whether the closer background source would, all on its own, give us an Einstein ring or multiple imaging of the most distant object (because multiple rings are, as far as I can tell, the qualitative outcome of both interpretations).

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