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Thread: Interplanetary Transport Network and gaseous materials

  1. #1
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    Interplanetary Transport Network and gaseous materials

    The Interplanetary Transport Network is a series of gravitationally determined pathways through out the solar system. It requires very little energy to follow these paths.

    Space is a vacuum, but does the density of gases increase along these paths? Or is the solar system so energetic that gas particles get pushed out off these paths easily? Is the ITN detectable by physical means, such as a space craft with particle detector passing through them?

    More than a decade ago, the JPL podcast mentioned that Cassini was picking up a stream of particles on its trip to Saturn. They seemed to be interstellar particles. I was thinking such an observation could be made of the ITN.
    Solfe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    The Interplanetary Transport Network is a series of gravitationally determined pathways through out the solar system. It requires very little energy to follow these paths.

    Space is a vacuum, but does the density of gases increase along these paths? Or is the solar system so energetic that gas particles get pushed out off these paths easily? Is the ITN detectable by physical means, such as a space craft with particle detector passing through them?

    More than a decade ago, the JPL podcast mentioned that Cassini was picking up a stream of particles on its trip to Saturn. They seemed to be interstellar particles. I was thinking such an observation could be made of the ITN.
    Could you give us a reference for the ITN? I have no reason to think there would be gas concentrations along these paths, whatever they are.

  3. #3
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    Silly name. The so-called Interplanetary Transport Network is in a state of constant flux and reconnection, linking together unstable Lagrange points using orbits that are momentarily energy-efficient. There's no way it can collect gas.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    Could you give us a reference for the ITN? I have no reason to think there would be gas concentrations along these paths, whatever they are.

    From wikipedia. Probably not the best source, but there it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Silly name. The so-called Interplanetary Transport Network is in a state of constant flux and reconnection, linking together unstable Lagrange points using orbits that are momentarily energy-efficient. There's no way it can collect gas.

    Grant Hutchison
    I think it's a great name, but misleading to the point of silliness. As far as merely sounding awesome or fascinating, it is almost as a cool sounding as "Killing vector field". Named after Wilhelm Killing, "killing" has nothing to do with what it is. It will not be used by Sith Lords, but sounds like it should be.
    Solfe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    I think it's a great name, but misleading to the point of silliness. As far as merely sounding awesome or fascinating, it is almost as a cool sounding as "Killing vector field". Named after Wilhelm Killing, "killing" has nothing to do with what it is.
    I may be old-fashioned, but a name that is and always has been misleading is a silly name as far as I'm concerned, no matter how awesome it sounds.

    (BTW: A misunderstanding of the word "killing" in "Killing vector" was a plot element in one of Charles Sheffield's McAndrew short stories.)

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I may be old-fashioned, but a name that is and always has been misleading is a silly name as far as I'm concerned, no matter how awesome it sounds.

    (BTW: A misunderstanding of the word "killing" in "Killing vector" was a plot element in one of Charles Sheffield's McAndrew short stories.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Oh, I am going to have to look that book up.
    Solfe

  7. #7
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    It makes for a handy way for me to remember what they do though. Killing fields "kill" the effects of changes on a manifold.

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

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