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Thread: Distributed Processing for personal and business use.

  1. #1
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    Distributed Processing for personal and business use.

    Is there a system whereby you sign up for and your computer is used by the network, for processing, but if your computer needs more processing power, it can get some, in return, when it needs it?
    Formerly Frog march.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaxRubiks View Post
    Is there a system whereby you sign up for and your computer is used by the network, for processing, but if your computer needs more processing power, it can get some, in return, when it needs it?
    I doubt there is, the reason being I think that most of us are not doing difficult processing tasks like molecular simulations, so the limitations come more from the time to write to memory or networks and not from the processor. So the loss from uploading tasks to the network would, I think, far offset any gain you would get. It does make sense to do that with intensive processing tasks done on supercomputers, though.


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    That's what the SETI@home (and then the various derivatives) project is, isn't it?

    https://setiathome.berkeley.edu/
    https://boinc.berkeley.edu/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...uting_projects

    CJSF
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    That's what the SETI@home (and then the various derivatives) project is, isn't it?

    https://setiathome.berkeley.edu/
    https://boinc.berkeley.edu/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...uting_projects

    CJSF
    they're just one way though aren't they; just donations of processor time.
    I'm talking about a two way set-up, whereby a business, or an individual, gives processor time, and when they need it, get some back, but as Jens said, most people don't need it, and the slowness is due to other things, other than processor speed.

    Some people might gain from it....those fractal zoom guys, for instance..
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    There must be just so much processor power left just idle these days. A business with thousands of PC could get back a lot of processor time when they need it, or just sell it...I think that might already happen though; the simply selling ..
    Formerly Frog march.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaxRubiks View Post
    There must be just so much processor power left just idle these days.
    Well yes, when my phone rings and I start talking to someone or when I go to a meeting, my powerful desktop just sits there doing nothing. But itís only a hundred dollar processor, so who cares really?


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  7. #7
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    Cloud services are somewhat close to that design, except all of the compute resources are owned by the providing organization. Providers build the infrastructure to handle peak loads based on measured and expected usage. Servers are virtualized. Excess compute capacity on a virtual cloud server is certainly available for other virtual servers to use, and additional resources can be given to any virtual device on an as-needed basis, but resources on your personal home device are not available to the provider.

    Although the sort of resource sharing you ask about could be designed, it's most likely too specific to be of general public use. Consider the requirements. 1) Work packets would have to be big enough to warrant the overhead cost of transmitting the request. To make that clear, consider the worst case: You want to add two numbers. It's much more efficient to just add them than it would be to transmit the numbers to another computer. 2) How much data has to be transmitted for the request? Say you wanted to sum a column in a table. Is it more efficient for computer A to send the entire table to computer B so computer B can add the column? Probably not. But if the table resides on shared storage and computer A has not yet read the storage, then it might be more efficient to tell computer B to read the table itself from storage and sum the column. So yes, that could work. But it is very specific to a particular case. Not everyone has many large tables on shared storage that they want to summarize. 3) Do you mind sharing data? Would you be okay if your bank sent all your data to a random computer somewhere in the world to have that computer calculate your balance? What if the bank wanted to have random user computers manage your accounts? You'd want to establish some control over what can and cannot be shared.
    Depending on whom you ask, everything is relative.

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