Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: upon the heat death of the universe. Will the matter start to behave in a weird way?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    9,120

    upon the heat death of the universe. Will the matter start to behave in a weird way?

    I read years ago that when some things approach 0 degrees kelvin, that they start to move against gravity and things.
    Will the matter in the later universe start to behave weirdly like that as the temperature drops to near 0K?
    ................................

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    36,940
    By the time the Universe gets to that state, the age of Matter As We Know It will have long since been over. First turned to iron by quantum tunneling particle decay, then turned to black holes, then probably evaporated by Hawking Radiation.
    Last edited by Noclevername; 2019-May-19 at 05:18 AM.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    7,122
    Quote Originally Posted by WaxRubiks View Post
    I read years ago that when some things approach 0 degrees kelvin, that they start to move against gravity and things.
    Do you mean something like the fountain effect? That's not really applicable in this scenario. There are some odd effects in bulk matter at very low temperatures but nothing as fundamental as suddenly changing how gravity works for them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    13,560
    Quote Originally Posted by Shaula View Post
    Do you mean something like the fountain effect? That's not really applicable in this scenario. There are some odd effects in bulk matter at very low temperatures but nothing as fundamental as suddenly changing how gravity works for them.
    I’m pretty sure they’re thinking of superfluid helium climbing up the container. Which, as you said, is not because of changing gravity.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    As above, so below

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    36,940
    ,
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    36,940
    Would the temperature ever reach zero K?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    a long way away
    Posts
    10,638
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    First turned to iron by quantum tunneling particle decay,
    There are lots of stable atoms other than iron, so I can't see the justification for this.

    then turned to black holes, then probably evaporated by Hawking Radiation.
    I can't see a mechanism for all matter turning into black holes either.
    Last edited by Strange; 2019-May-19 at 05:28 PM. Reason: typo

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    a long way away
    Posts
    10,638
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Would the temperature ever reach zero K?
    If expansion continues then the temperature will approach ever closer. (It can't actually reach 0K)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    36,940
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    There are lots of stable arms other than iron, so I can't see the justification for this.



    I can't see a mechanism for all matter turning into black holes either.
    You know what, I'm actually glad I posted the above, because it gives folks like Strange something to correct and therefore set the record straight. I'm the best bad example!

    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    730
    There is a version of 'the end of the universe' in which all matter ends up as electron-positron pairs (positronium) with orbits of the order of the size of the current observable universe. Based, in part, I think on the idea of proton decay, in turn based on now inconsistent-with-experiment supersymmetry theories.

    From memory, the 'it all becomes black holes' idea came from assuming something about Dark Energy and that gravitational wave radiation would lead to every bound system ending up as a single massive object, which would have to be a black hole. Not sure if these ideas are anything more than highly speculative ...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    a long way away
    Posts
    10,638
    The astrophysicist Katie Mack has done lots of talks (and tweets) about the possible ways the universe will end. There are probably videos of this somewhere (I'm not a big fan of videos, so haven't looked): https://cosmosmagazine.com/physics/s...he-nice-option

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •