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    Apollo 11 - 2019 Documentary

    As mentioned in the What Are You Watching thread, I recently saw the new Apollo 11 documentary and very much enjoyed the film, especially in a large screen format. I had hoped to see the film in IMAX but the producers apparently decided to limit the IMAX run to a week or so, and only in a few of the local theaters. Ah well. In any case think of this as the ultimate Apollo 11 highlight reel. On steroids.

    There's a lot of chatter on the interweb about the film and how Todd Douglas Miller found quite a lot of 65mm footage that NASA had never used or rarely used, and a fair number of mission slides taken on the surface with the 70 mm Hasselblad camera carried by Armstrong and rescanned for use in the movie. So there's some new footage never seen before and much more remastered or rescanned. As I said the launch sequence alone is worth seeing the film. There is closeup footage of the F1 exhaust that I had never seen.

    Some scenes in the film were not captured during the actual mission and Miller has been upfront about using that footage to illustrate what was taking place at that point in the mission timeline. But two scenes I had never seen before and can't quite figure out how they were captured:

    - TLI burn. Floating on screen, somewhat blurry in a field of black, is what appears to be the S-IVB stack. At the moment of TLI we see the engine ignite. This is NOT the scene taken from the AS-202 test flight but instead seems as if a telescope was aimed at the stack and captured the moment of ignition.

    - LEM shadow while orbiting the moon. This is a short sequence apparently taken during LEM descent by a Command Module Pilot. I've never see this film and I'm not sure that it came from Apollo 11 or another lunar mission. The LEM is visible as a small object flying above the lunar surface with what seems to be a shadow beneath. Definitely not the footage of the LEM ascent and docking.

    I can see a DVD purchase in my near future.
    Last edited by schlaugh; 2019-Mar-21 at 04:42 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    As mentioned in the What Are You Watching thread, I recently saw the new Apollo 11 documentary and very much enjoyed the film, especially in a large screen format. I had hoped to see the film in IMAX but the producers apparently decided to limit the IMAX run to a week or so, and only in a few of the local theaters. Ah well. In any case think of this as the ultimate Apollo 11 highlight reel. On steroids.

    There's a lot of chatter on the interweb about the film and how Todd Douglas Miller found quite a lot of 65mm footage that NASA had never used or rarely used, and a fair number of mission slides taken on the surface with the 70 mm Hasselblad camera carried by Armstrong and rescanned for use in the movie. So there's some new footage never seen before and much more remastered or rescanned. As I said the launch sequence alone is worth seeing the film. There is closeup footage of the F1 exhaust that I had never seen.

    Some scenes in the film were not captured during the actual mission and Miller has been upfront about using that footage to illustrate what was taking place at that point in the mission timeline. But two scenes I had never seen before and can't quite figure out how they were captured:

    - TLI burn. Floating on screen, somewhat blurry in a field of black, is what appears to be the S-IVB stack. At the moment of TLI we see the engine ignite. This is NOT the scene taken from the AS-202 test flight but instead seems as if a telescope was aimed at the stack and captured the moment of ignition.

    - LEM shadow while orbiting the moon. This is a short sequence apparently taken during LEM descent by a Command Module Pilot. I've never see this film and I'm not sure that it came from Apollo 11 or another lunar mission. The LEM is visible as a small object flying above the lunar surface with what seems to be a shadow beneath. Definitely not the footage of the LEM ascent and docking.

    I can see a DVD purchase in my near future.
    Isn't some of this from previous Space Films?
    I have heard of the TLI burn and I would love to see this. All of the Apollo images from LEO to LOI are from this wb page;
    http://pages.astronomy.ua.edu/keel/space/apollo.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    I have heard of the TLI burn and I would love to see this. All of the Apollo images from LEO to LOI are from this wb page;
    http://pages.astronomy.ua.edu/keel/space/apollo.html
    (Gratuitous references like that make it worth my whole to have assembled those images...)

    AFAIK the best TLI images were from Apollo 8 where the Smithsonian camera on Maui had a good angle and good illumination for a series of stills. I've heard from someone on the recovery team that their carrier group had a good view of TLI for Apollo 11, but as far as he knew there was nobody official tasked to do photography.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ngc3314 View Post
    (Gratuitous references like that make it worth my whole to have assembled those images...)

    AFAIK the best TLI images were from Apollo 8 where the Smithsonian camera on Maui had a good angle and good illumination for a series of stills. I've heard from someone on the recovery team that their carrier group had a good view of TLI for Apollo 11, but as far as he knew there was nobody official tasked to do photography.
    Just to be clear, the documentary shows film (or video, I suppose) of TLI ignition and it looks like it was taken from Earth, similar to the videos taken by NGCHunter of the ISS.

    This is going to bug me until the DVD releases in May.

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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Just to be clear, the documentary shows film (or video, I suppose) of TLI ignition and it looks like it was taken from Earth, similar to the videos taken by NGCHunter of the ISS.
    Ah ha, thank you Scott Manley! Apparently the sequence was film taken by Apollo 9 astronauts when Houston commanded the S-IVB to reignite and leave low Earth orbit.

    Scott's discussion is here: https://youtu.be/780SAiciNbU

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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Ah ha, thank you Scott Manley! Apparently the sequence was film taken by Apollo 9 astronauts when Houston commanded the S-IVB to reignite and leave low Earth orbit.

    Scott's discussion is here: https://youtu.be/780SAiciNbU
    Bummer that it wasn't a TLI burn. But I haven't seen the movie, yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    ....

    - LEM shadow while orbiting the moon.
    This is a short sequence apparently taken during LEM descent by a Command Module Pilot. I've never see this film and I'm not sure that it came from Apollo 11 or another lunar mission. The LEM is visible as a small object flying above the lunar surface with what seems to be a shadow beneath. Definitely not the footage of the LEM ascent and docking.

    I can see a DVD purchase in my near future.
    Well, I bought the DVD and now I think the answer to this issue is pretty darn mundane; specks on Columbia's window. Sheesh....

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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Well, I bought the DVD and now I think the answer to this issue is pretty darn mundane; specks on Columbia's window. Sheesh....
    I agree as I couldn't see any shadow, but I disagree with your description of the linked video. It is defiantly the ascent and rendezvous.

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    Yes, I misremembered from the original film. It was the ascent sequence.

    Old brain cells....

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    A nice docu--wait a minute...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZS9M52Bd_w

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    Finally got to see this movie in the IMAX at the London Science Museum. Excellent compilation of footage.
    Can't believe how composed (and young!) Armstrong looked during the pre-flight suit-up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGN Fuel View Post
    Finally got to see this movie in the IMAX at the London Science Museum. Excellent compilation of footage.
    Can't believe how composed (and young!) Armstrong looked during the pre-flight suit-up.
    Not seen in an IMAX but on the regular TV, but we were all young, 50 years ago(for those of us who were born before July 16-24 1969.

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    And a bit of trivia...the documentary shows a pre-launch scene where launch control engineers are conducting a last-minute briefing. In the center of the room is a woman, notable because she is surrounded by men and apparently the only female in the room. Turns out this is Joann Morgan who enjoyed a very long and highly productive career at NASA, starting in 1958 and retiring in 2003.

    From the linked NASA site:

    [Morgan] entered the federal workforce as a University of Florida student trainee with the Army Ballistic Missile Agency in 1958, and worked for NASA on the Mercury and Gemini Programs. In the Apollo, Skylab, and Apollo-Soyuz Programs, she was a key member of the KSC launch team and the first woman to work in the launch control center. Morgan then became one of the KSC team developing the Space Shuttle launch processing system central data subsystem (CDS), which was initially used for the first launch of the Orbiter Columbia.
    https://i.postimg.cc/PrbftmvN/49-F62...631666-E42.jpg

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