Page 1 of 10 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 297

Thread: Space Telescope: The Next Generation (James Webb)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    2,677

    Space Telescope: The Next Generation (James Webb)

    It seems the contractor and basic design for the NGST has finally been chosen. Now they can get down to the details of actually building it.

    http://www.msnbc.com/news/806090.asp?cp1=1

    http://nytimes.com/2002/09/17/science/space/17TELE.html (registration required)

    The articles say the mirror has been shrunk from 26 feet to 20 feet in diameter (What, not in meters?), but that it still should be powerful enough to image things 100 times fainter than the HST in visible light and 400 times fainter in infrared.

    They also seem to be focused on avoiding the kind of manufacturing goof-ups that they've had in the past. And since the telescope will be non-serviceable, they will build the critical systems to last longer.

    I can't wait to see what kind of images we'll get with it. If Hubble made our mouths water, just imagine what this one will do. But can we hold out until 2010?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    294
    One of the few gripes I'd have is the choice in names. It seems this one is more politically motivated than the naming of the HST.

    I suppose the 20-foot dimension was for the benefit of us Americans and our silly standard measurement system. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif[/img]


    -Adam

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    7,732
    On 2002-09-17 12:12, Firefox wrote:
    One of the few gripes I'd have is the choice in names. It seems this one is more politically motivated than the naming of the HST.
    I would say it's more financially motivated. Management holds the purse strings. If naming the scope after one of their own is what it takes, it is a small price to pay to get it funded. Also, as I read the NYT article, the astronomers have no beef with the name.

    I suppose the 20-foot dimension was for the benefit of us Americans and our silly standard measurement system.
    So, call it a six meter scope if that makes you happy. At least they didn't call it a "240 inch" [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    _________________
    Be alert! The world needs more lerts.

    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Kaptain K on 2002-09-17 13:05 ]</font>

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    561
    On 2002-09-17 13:03, Kaptain K wrote:
    I suppose the 20-foot dimension was for the benefit of us Americans and our silly standard measurement system.
    So, call it a six meter scope if that makes you happy. At least they didn't call it a "240 inch" [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]
    That gave me a flashback to an old Bill Cosby skit about Noah and the Ark. God goes through this lengthy explanation of the ark's design and dimensions. After all the details, Noah just looks dumbly at God and goes "What's a cubit?"

    You have to hear Cosby do it to get the full effect [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif[/img]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    321
    On 2002-09-17 09:36, David Hall wrote:
    And since the telescope will be non-serviceable, they will build the critical systems to last longer.
    I've got a nickel that says that sometime during the life of the new scope, there will need to be a servicing mission. Anyone want to take the bet?


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    348
    On 2002-09-17 14:31, aurorae wrote:
    On 2002-09-17 09:36, David Hall wrote:
    And since the telescope will be non-serviceable, they will build the critical systems to last longer.
    I've got a nickel that says that sometime during the life of the new scope, there will need to be a servicing mission. Anyone want to take the bet?

    No kidding. Not serviceable? Why does that make me cringe?

    I can already see it:

    Senior technician: Alright, the inaugural photo went well, time for photo #2.

    Junior technician: Sir, we have a malfunction with the telescope.

    Senior technician: D'oh!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    585
    On 2002-09-17 14:31, aurorae wrote:

    I've got a nickel that says that sometime during the life of the new scope, there will need to be a servicing mission. Anyone want to take the bet?
    That should be interesting since they're putting it out at L1. That would be one heck of a shuttle mission!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    314
    On 2002-09-17 14:43, Rich wrote:
    On 2002-09-17 14:31, aurorae wrote:

    I've got a nickel that says that sometime during the life of the new scope, there will need to be a servicing mission. Anyone want to take the bet?
    That should be interesting since they're putting it out at L1. That would be one heck of a shuttle mission!
    In fact, that would be the furthest from Earth a human has ever been, wouldn't it?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,570
    On 2002-09-17 13:17, traztx wrote:
    That gave me a flashback to an old Bill Cosby skit about Noah and the Ark. God goes through this lengthy explanation of the ark's design and dimensions. After all the details, Noah just looks dumbly at God and goes "What's a cubit?"

    You have to hear Cosby do it to get the full effect [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif[/img]
    "Bill Cosby Is A Very Funny Fellow, RIGHT" I still have the record album from about '64. I listened to that track so many times I could quote the whole thing from memory. A wonderfully funny skit! [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif[/img]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    621
    The Chandra X-RAY Telescope cannot be serviced in its orbit. That's why they didn't do as much pre-launch publicity. Not as much egg on the face if something goes wrong.

    L1 would definitely be the farthest from Earth anyone has ever gone if a mission was attempted!

    And when Noah asks God, "What's a cubit?" God says, "Oh, a cubit...I used to know this one"

    [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    Rob

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    7,732
    That should be interesting since they're putting it out at L1.
    Make that L2. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif[/img]
    That would be one heck of a shuttle mission!
    Yup! And beyond our current capabilities. This has "Murphy's Law" written all over it in dayglo ink. I'm hoping for the best, but I sure hope that someone is at least planning for "less than optimal" scenarios. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    311
    On 2002-09-17 15:38, Kaptain K wrote:
    That would be one heck of a shuttle mission!
    Yup! And beyond our current capabilities.
    They wouldn't be able to make it through the deadly radiation of the van Allen Belt!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    585
    L2? I stand corrected.

    They wouldn't be able to make it through the deadly radiation of the van Allen Belt!
    I hadn't thought of that. Won't that fry the satellite anyway? I mean, if we can't protect a couple people from it how can we possibly protect billions of dollars of sensitive equipment? [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Rich on 2002-09-17 17:23 ]</font>

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    311
    It's a joke, it's what the moon hoaxers cite as the reason NASA couldn't go to the moon.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    153
    It won't be serviceable, but it will also
    be ALLOT cheaper than the last space telescope. There are allot of more expensive, non-serviceable satelites and probes out there.

    I wouldn't be surprised, though, if they made 2 of them. Especially if they are using unusualy new tech and need super-high precision. The second spacecraft does not cost nearly as much once you've built one. The second craft would be either a backup or a bonus depending on how first one worked. The Viking and Voyager missions were built this way.

    It may be possible to have robotic servicing missions. This is being seriously considered for commercial communications satelites in geosynchronous orbit - though all that would be attempted at first would be to simply attach a new motor + fuel to a satelite that had run out.

    As has been stated before re the moon hoax -
    The Van Allen belts do not pose any danger for humans as long as you don't dilly-dally in the worst parts. If you go right through - your ok, the added radiation dose isn't terribly significant. Kind of like Fire walking - the ritual where you take three quick steps as you walk over a bed of super-hot coals.

    Satelites can be hardened to withstand the Van Allen belt radiation. The Galileo probe even braves much worse regions near Jupiter.

    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Cloudy on 2002-09-18 02:47 ]</font>

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    585
    Andrew,

    I got that... hence the: [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif[/img]

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    29,889
    On 2002-09-17 12:12, Firefox wrote:
    One of the few gripes I'd have is the choice in names. It seems this one is more politically motivated than the naming of the HST.

    I suppose the 20-foot dimension was for the benefit of us Americans and our silly standard measurement system. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif[/img]
    -Adam
    I for one don't have a problem with naming the telescope after the best administrator NASA's ever had, and one who tried to support science in addition to his clear mandate for "man-moon-decade." Heck, they ought to call the whole agency the James Webb Space Administration!

    And I would expect that the "20-foot" figure is a press release number for the benefit of the metrically illiterate.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    314
    Well, how much resolution on Pluto will we get from the NGST (or whatever it's called now)? Will it compare to the data obtained from the Pluto-Charon eclipses?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,853
    Ask Reiner Illig at Ball Aerospace. rillig@ball.com
    Ball won the Webb Space Telescope contract along with TRW, and Reiner has long been interested in similar problems, like even attempting to resolve extrasolar planets.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    29,889
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    29,889
    Technology and contractor selected for JWST mirror

    Ball Aerospace did COSTAR (Hubble's "eyeglasses") as well as numerous other notable spacecraft systems over the years.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    589
    Why is it beyond our capabilities to put someone at L2? Couldn't a Saturn V (granted there aren't really any at the moment but so what) reach escape velocity with the Apollo vehicles? If you can do that you should be able to go anywhere, right? It's not so far away that you'd need to take four years worth of supplies.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    29,889
    Quote Originally Posted by Madcat
    Why is it beyond our capabilities to put someone at L2? Couldn't a Saturn V (granted there aren't really any at the moment but so what) reach escape velocity with the Apollo vehicles? If you can do that you should be able to go anywhere, right? It's not so far away that you'd need to take four years worth of supplies.
    Exactly: a Saturn V with an Apollo capsule would do it just fine, but we haven't got any of those and haven't had one for about 30 years now. The shuttle is incapable of making it to the L2 point, and it's the only game in town for manned flight. Developing a system to get human beings to the L2 point would cost far more than the spacecraft that are going to be there. It's even argued that Hubble servicing missions aren't cost-effective: it might be better and cheaper just to build a whole 'nother spacecraft.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    385
    For the uninitiated (e.g. me), what do L1/L2/etc mean? Where are these locations and what is the significance?

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    7,732
    Lagrange points are quasi-stable (L1, L2 and L3) and stable (L4 and L5) points in relation to two other objects. See here:

    http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_mm/ob_techorbit1.html

    The Earth-Sun L1 is where SOHO is stationed. The Earth-Sun L2 is home to WMAP and the future home of the NGST. The L4 and L5 points are the "trojan points.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    385
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaptain K
    Lagrange points are quasi-stable (L1, L2 and L3) and stable (L4 and L5) points in relation to two other objects. See here:

    http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_mm/ob_techorbit1.html

    The Earth-Sun L1 is where SOHO is stationed. The Earth-Sun L2 is home to WMAP and the future home of the NGST. The L4 and L5 points are the "trojan points.
    Got it.

    Thanks.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,704
    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWSP) is the replacment of the Hubble.

    Info can be found at JWST Info and at JWST FAQ.

    It will be able to see stars 10 to 100 times fainter than the Hubble. It won&#39;t be able to see in (all) visible light though. But apparently thats not necessary because of Red Shift. It will be mainly looking in the infra-red area of the spectrum.

    It will also help in the search for Dark Matter, it will be able to detect planets and various other things. Probably the most important thing is that it will be able to look deep into space, and thus deep into time.

    JWST proposed launch date is August 2011.

  28. #28
    Glom's Avatar
    Glom is offline Insert awesome title here
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    11,213
    Quote Originally Posted by Firefox
    One of the few gripes I'd have is the choice in names. It seems this one is more politically motivated than the naming of the HST.
    We could pretend it's really called the Jay Windley Space Telescope. :wink:

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    235
    The James Webb Space Telescope is considered to be the next generation space telescope that will extend the reach and scientific discoveries started by the Hubble Space Telescope. For those interested in its progress visit the following link.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/news/telescopes-04c.html

    Please note that JWST won&#39;t launch until after 2011. Also because it will be at the L2 location it will be 1.5 million kilometers from Earth. It will not receive service missions like the Hubble.

    Cheers

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4
    :angry: .........They " whoever &#39;they are , are nuts nuts to skuttle the Hubble &#33;
    Star-mite.

Similar Threads

  1. James Webb Space Telescope
    By Blackhole in forum Astronomy
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 2012-Jan-12, 10:22 AM
  2. James Webb Space Telescope Nearing Completion
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2011-Sep-02, 05:10 AM
  3. James Webb Space Telescope Begins To Take Shape
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2009-Sep-15, 09:00 PM
  4. James Webb Space Telescope
    By Deep_Eye in forum Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 2003-Sep-16, 12:14 AM
  5. Nice article on the James Webb Space Telescope
    By John Kierein in forum Space Exploration
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2003-Jan-27, 05:02 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •