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Thread: International Space Station

  1. #1
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    I've heard through the grapevine that the ISS may be abandoned, both on financial grounds and because intense vibration running through the station structure makes many of the planned uses difficult or impossible. is there any truth to these rumors? (I'm defense community, not space so anything I hear about the space program gets distorted)

  2. #2
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    First I've heard. If there were any truth to the rumor, I'd expect either NasaWatch or Bob Park (who really has it in for the ISS) to have mentioned it.

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    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ToSeek on 2002-11-27 09:55 ]</font>

  3. #3
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    I just read an article about it here
    http://www.msnbc.com/news/840268.asp?0dm=C11MT

    If the evacuation really happens no matter who's fault it is NASA will get covered in a lot of mud.

    -AJ

  4. #4
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    Abandon ship! Spend the money on something worthwhile!

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    Fear not fellow astronaut wannabees! The ISS is on schedule to complete it's upgrade through Shuttle flight 10A in Feb. 2004 to install U.S. Node 2 and complete the solar array. It leaves as questionable about 20 missions scheduled from April 2004 to January 2008.

    This is borrowed from a post I made on another BB 11-14-2002:

    Looks like NASA has figured a way out of their budget problems and will finish the ISS and extend the Shuttle program with the assist of a new Space Plane. President Bush has signed off on this.

    CNN article:

    The budget amendment calls for spending:

    $1.6 billion to upgrade and improve the four-vehicle space shuttle fleet so it could operate until about 2012. The plan leaves open an option of extending shuttle usage into the 2020s.

    $15.2 billion over the next decade or so to add a fifth shuttle flight to the annual schedule. The shuttle has been limited by budget constraints to four flights a year and nearly all have been dedicated to assembly of the space station. The added flight could be used to accelerate station assembly or to perform other missions that are not now possible.

    $6.6 billion through 2006 to finish the basic assembly of the space station. This includes completion and installation by February 19, 2004, of Node 2, a U.S.-made cornerstone component to which European and Japanese components will be attached. "Node 2 completion is a big deal for us," said O'Keefe.

    $1.8 billion to support biological and physical research aboard the space station.

    $2.4 billion to research and develop technologies needed to build a new space system to replace the shuttle. This money would continue a long-range effort to develop a reusable craft that could frequently fly into orbit with less preparation and effort than is required for the space shuttle. O'Keefe would not estimate the final cost of such a craft, but a chart released by the agency suggested it would first fly in 2015.

    $2.4 billion to complete by 2004 the design of a new space plane that is intended specifically to ferry people in and out of space. O'Keefe said the design is still uncertain, but it would be a reusable spacecraft launched by expendable rockets. It could carry as many as 10 people. The plan calls for the craft to start operations sometime between 2008 and 2010.
    See also NASA's budget site.



  6. #6
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    If nasa ever did that I would lose a lot of respect for them.

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    Did you guys notice the APOD a couple days ago? Click on the image to get a nice blow up of the space station.

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    Is that thing about the vibrations true?

  9. #9
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    This is the earliest thread I could find on the ISS. It is more about doom and how the vibration will mean abandoning it for good. Got news for you folks. ISS just celebrated 15 years from when the first crew to inhabit the research laboratory project arrived on November 2, 2000. Congratulations and happy 15th anniversary

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Sp...nauts_999.html

    The ISS was just a two-module unit when the first crew to inhabit the research laboratory project arrived on November 2, 2000.

    They were American astronaut Bill Shepherd and Russian cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko.

    Since then, a rotating cast of more than 220 of the world's elite astronauts have lived and worked at the ISS, which includes 16 participating nations and is led by the United States and Russia.

    Modules were added over time and today the football-stadium-sized outfit represents about $100 billion dollars in investment and provides as much living space as a six-bedroom house.

    Traveling at an altitude of about 250 miles (400 kilometers) and a speed of about 17,500 miles (28,000 kilometers) per hour, the space station circles the Earth once every 90 minutes.

    Typically, six crew at a time eat, sleep and float around in the microgravity environment, working 35 hours per week on a host of science projects for a mission duration of about six months.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    This is the earliest thread I could find on the ISS. It is more about doom and how the vibration will mean abandoning it for good. Got news for you folks. ISS just celebrated 15 years from when the first crew to inhabit the research laboratory project arrived on November 2, 2000. Congratulations and happy 15th anniversary

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Sp...nauts_999.html

    The ISS was just a two-module unit when the first crew to inhabit the research laboratory project arrived on November 2, 2000.

    They were American astronaut Bill Shepherd and Russian cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko.

    Since then, a rotating cast of more than 220 of the world's elite astronauts have lived and worked at the ISS, which includes 16 participating nations and is led by the United States and Russia.

    Modules were added over time and today the football-stadium-sized outfit represents about $100 billion dollars in investment and provides as much living space as a six-bedroom house.

    Traveling at an altitude of about 250 miles (400 kilometers) and a speed of about 17,500 miles (28,000 kilometers) per hour, the space station circles the Earth once every 90 minutes.

    Typically, six crew at a time eat, sleep and float around in the microgravity environment, working 35 hours per week on a host of science projects for a mission duration of about six months.
    Thank you, messenger from the future. We see now that our fears of ISS abandonment were unfounded.

  11. #11
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    This thread dates back to Pre STS 107. A lot changed when that happened. It is some wonder ISS was able to grow to what it is.

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    The ISS is a marvel. I wonder if NASA can do a human mission to Mars and an ISS 2? I believe or have read that ISS is good 'til 2024; just about the time that things will start rolling for a Mars mission.

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    Well maybe 2024 is a little optimistic on the Mars front...alot optimistic.

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    Old age is showing. The ISS has a small problem with its power supply.

    http://spaceflight101.com/space-stat...overy-options/

    A switching box feeding power from one of the Station’s eight solar array wings tripped due to a short in the 1B power channel, leading to a loss of a number of systems on ISS. There is no immediate danger to the crew and systems are expected to be restored later on Friday by connecting them to another power channel. However, it will take Mission Control several days to diagnose the 1B issue, according to information passed to the six crew members on board the orbiting complex.

    The trip in Direct Current Switching Unit 1B occurred around 18 UTC on Friday and knocked out one eighth of the Station’s total power, taking down one power channel. With one channel down, ISS still has seven good power supply channels which can carry all loads, permitting nominal operations to continue after loads have been re-balanced. A power management plan may be implemented to ensure margins for the individual channels are being protected, but all essential systems will receive continuous power.

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    ISS is back to normal. The affected power systems have since been switched to alternate channels.

    Repairs to the affected area is another story. It will have to wait for parts to be delivered by a cargo early next year. It will then need at least one space walk to fix it.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Sp...eeded_999.html

    As SpaceFlight101 reported, most the systems that went down were redundant. No vital components completely lost power.

    NASA told reporters that none of the astronauts are in danger and that the rest of power channels are functioning properly, but the damage may require spacewalk repairs. Astronauts must first wait for a new piece of electrical equipment to be delivered via a resupply rocket. A SpaceX rocket and cargo capsule will likely deliver the part early next year.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    This is the earliest thread I could find on the ISS.
    Well, it was only a month after the (current) incarnation of the board. Wow, thirteen years

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    Canada is doing its bit to help the ISS prolong it's life. It is developing a new advanced space vision system to inspect the exterior of the station.

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    Talk about bad luck. Again when they are about to do a space walk, they detect water in one of the helmets.

    http://m.space.com/31635-water-leak-...spacewalk.html

    For the second time in less than three years, a spacewalk outside of the International Space Station has been cut short because of a water leak in an astronaut's helmet.
    A spacewalk involving NASA astronaut Tim Kopra and British colleague Tim Peake was called off about 2 hours early today (Jan. 15) when Kopra noticed some water inside his helmet.

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToSeek View Post
    First I've heard. If there were any truth to the rumor, I'd expect either NasaWatch or Bob Park (who really has it in for the ISS) to have mentioned it.

    _________________
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    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ToSeek on 2002-11-27 09:55 ]</font>
    With friends like those...

  20. #20
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    Now here is a pretty picture from the ISS. It is a flower and can be eaten.

    http://www.tecake.com/scott-kelly-se...r-grown-space/

    US astronaut Scott Kelly aboard International Space Station (ISS) has tweeted the stunning pictures of the first flower grown in space. The first flower is an edible zinnia that is consumable and can be used in salads..

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    There might be an addition to the ISS. NanoRacks is proposing to build a large, half-cylinder-shaped airlock by the US private industry. This is good news indeed as with Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) that is more interest being shown by the private industry.

    http://spaceksc.blogspot.my/2016/01/port-of-call.html

    Eric Berger writes that “The $12 million-15 million airlock would also allow NASA to bring in costly large pumps and storage tanks for repairs rather than disposing of them.”

    In January 2014, the Obama administration announced its intention to extend the ISS to 2024, four years beyond the existing agreement among the fifteen partner nations. As of this writing, all partners except the European Space Agency have agreed to the extension, and ESA is working through the formalities.

    Extending the ISS to 2024 helped convince the NewSpace industry that there won't be a repeat of 2004, when the Bush administration announced its intention to end the station in Fiscal Year 2016 to fund what came to be known as Constellation. That administration chose to phase out university and commercial microgravity research in favor of research geared towards long-duration human spaceflight to the Moon and eventually to Mars. Principal investigators who were trying to raise money to fund ISS research felt betrayed by the NASA bureaucracy, and that distrust has lingered for years.

    The multi-million dollar commitment by NanoRacks to add a new portal signals that the private sector now feels confident ISS will remain available for at least another ten years, if not longer.

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    The Russians will be getting upgraded spacesuits for their spacewalks from the ISS on 2016

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Ru..._2016_999.html

    Three new advanced Russian Orlan-MKS spacesuits will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) by the end of 2016, the head of the Russian segment of the ISS said on Wednesday.

  23. #23
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    Astronauts Kelly and Kornienko land after "Year in Space" mission aboard ISS

    http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/new...ion-aboard-iss

    NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko returned to Earth tonight (March 1) aboard the Soyuz TMA-18M spacecraft after 340 days in space. NASA bills the mission as a "Year in Space" even though it is not quite a year. It sets a record for the longest continuous duration in space for an American astronaut.

    Joining Kelly and Kornienko on the ride home was cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, who arrived on the International Space Station in September.

    The trio landed on the steppes of Kazahstan at 11:26 pm ET (10:26 am March 2 local time at the landing site). Kelly will soon board an airplane to fly back to Houston,TX. NASA TV is scheduled to cover his landing there at about 11:45 pm ET tomorrow (March 2) where he will be met by Second Lady of the United States Dr. Jill Biden, Science Adviser to the President John Holdren, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and his brother, former astronaut Mark Kelly.

    The Kelly brothers are identical twins and have been participating in a Twins Study throughout the mission to help scientists investigate the effects of long duration spaceflight mission on the human body in preparation for longer trips to destinations like Mars.

    Although this is the longest continuous duration in space for an American, four Russian cosmonauts have spent 365 days or more in space. The record for total consecutive days in space is held by cosmonaut Valeri Polyakov who spent 438 days aboard the Mir space station in 1994-1995. Sergei Avdeyev spent 380 days on Mir in 1998-1999. Vladimir Titov and Musa Manarov spent 365 days together on Mir in 1987-1988. In all cases, other crews came and went during those missions.

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    If there is any truth in this article then we have to thank China for the extension to 2024 and maybe longer.

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    The next crew to the ISS successfully launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome aboard Russia's Soyuz TMA-20M spacecraft at 5:26:38 pm Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) 18/3/2016. The article also contains a history of Russian space stations and a bit of their current financial problems.

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    Next flight of SpaceX to the ISS will have some experiments that will help with the journey to Mars. It of course includes BEAM but also a few other interesting experiments.

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    A short video on BEAM can be seen here. It will show it being extracted from storage, then attached to the ISS and expended.

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    Everything you wanted to know about BEAM but were afraid to ask

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    More expandable than inflatable.

    How do you ground all inflatable space stations. As modules on ISS that's fine--but you abandon metal at your own risk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    How do you ground all inflatable space stations. As modules on ISS that's fine--but you abandon metal at your own risk.
    If the article selvaarchi linked is accurate, the outer layers might serve the same purpose.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon...site_materials

    Reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) consists of carbon fiber-reinforced graphite, and is used structurally in high-temperature applications. The fiber also finds use in filtration of high-temperature gases, as an electrode with high surface area and impeccable corrosion resistance, and as an anti-static component.
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