Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 31 to 40 of 40

Thread: bear repellent

  1. #31
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,081
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Brak View Post
    So does wearing sunglasses on the back of your head help deter bears? (I admit I'm not really a bear expert.) Sounds easier than carrying chemical weapons and fireworks, but it could be terribly embarrassing if it doesn't work.
    Nah; bears don't care if you're looking.

    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    12,854
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Brak View Post
    In Australia, to avoid bear attacks, it is vitally important not to smell like eycalyptus.
    That might work with some bears. But from what I understand, drop bears are carnivorous!
    As above, so below

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,081
    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    That might work with some bears. But from what I understand, drop bears are carnivorous!
    Plus, of course, Australian bears are venomous. And eat salties.

    Whole.

    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  4. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    677
    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Plus, of course, Australian bears are venomous. And eat salties.

    Whole.
    No, fierce but not venomous. You are getting them confused with the Platypus, Blue Ring Octopus, Irukandji jellyfish, Stone Fish and virtually everything else here.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,160
    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Nah; bears don't care if you're looking.
    Yeah, it's tigers that care if you're looking at them due to them being stalkers. The people that patrol the Sundarbans wear a one piece solid iron vest and helmet combo, with eyes painted on the backs of the helmets. The helmet and vest are one piece to prevent the tiger from breaking your neck. Looks like a lighter version of a diving suit, without all the extra windows. These guys travel in groups of ten or more so the armor isn't meant to protect you indefinitely, just until your buds can turn around and hose the beast.

    Sundarbans tigers are infamous for snatching the last person in line on a trail unnoticed until way too late. They're so adept at it that nobody hears anything. The tigers achieve this quietness by their technique. They stalk behind the last guy in line, rise up on their tippy toes and deliver a powerful bite to the back of the victim's neck. And that's that. You're done. No roar, no drama. Then they pull you off into the brush and up a tree. They have done this for so long the local myth is the tigers actually eat the screams of their victims.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,160
    Oh, and an explanation and clarification on the play dead/don't play dead thing.

    With the brown/grizzly bears, attacks are often territorial and or dominance based. That's why playing dead can work out for you *sometimes*. And I will reiterate once again my caution against reaching up and touching a bear's scratching post if you find one in the woods. Never ever do that. Locally dominate male bears spend a lot of time watching their scratching posts waiting for another male bear to come along and try to scratch higher than their scratch marks.

    So unless you're another male bear, never ever do that. Also treat a bear's scratching post as you would a bear sighting and turn around and go the other way.

    With black bears, when attacks do happen, they are often what's known as "predation events". Large male black bears get this way once they get over 300 or so pounds and begin preying on deer.

    So playing dead is very counterproductive. You're just telling the black bear, "I give up, eat me."
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    2,774
    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    With the brown/grizzly bears, attacks are often territorial and or dominance based. That's why playing dead can work out for you *sometimes*.
    Oh, bear story time...
    Several friends of mine have submitted to attacking grizzlies and survived. They were not touched at all by the bears, although there was a lot of sniffing and snorting going on in one case. In another case (friend of a friend), the bear picked up the fellow by the hip and shook him like a rag doll. He said every joint ached for a week after that, never mind the punctures.

    And I will reiterate once again my caution against reaching up and touching a bear's scratching post if you find one in the woods. Never ever do that. Locally dominate male bears spend a lot of time watching their scratching posts waiting for another male bear to come along and try to scratch higher than their scratch marks.

    So unless you're another male bear, never ever do that. Also treat a bear's scratching post as you would a bear sighting and turn around and go the other way.
    You can get away with that if the bear is hibernating:
    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Marker posts.... I've seen a few, but one I found years ago was really spectacular. It happened to be winter and I was on snowshoes with maybe 4-5 feet of crusty snow on the ground. At 6'4", I could easily reach the top of the scars. Still, I looked around - a bit like a criminal about to do something illegal - tied some survey ribbon above the scars, and continued on my way.
    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    With black bears, when attacks do happen, they are often what's known as "predation events". Large male black bears get this way once they get over 300 or so pounds and begin preying on deer.

    So playing dead is very counterproductive. You're just telling the black bear, "I give up, eat me."
    That's right, if you are attacked, the recommendation is to fight back with everything you've got. A bluff charge can turn into a predation event if you submit. I've had large black bears approach me in a cautious but persistent way, and I've always assumed this was the bear assessing me and whether it might be safe to try a predatory attack. It's an unnerving situation. Sometimes a bear banger (a really noisy explosive variant of a pen flare) scares them away. It usually works with na´ve bears, but not so well on bears that are habituated to humans. The general tactic that worked for me was to look as large as possible (I carried a shovel with me when doing ecological classification work, and I would wave that over my head), while having the bear spray ready to deliver a surprise into the animal's face if it got close enough.

    Also, odds of avoiding such encounters are greatly improved by simply being in a group of people, rather than alone. But I seldom had that luxury in my work.

    Seven years ago (has it really been that long?) I described being charged by a black bear, here.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,160
    Torsten, And with polar bears it's just, "RUN!" if one is inadequately armed.


    Do you know there are people that think being on horse-back is protective from attack by grizzlys?

    I had to explain that grizzlys chase down white tailed deer and eat them. A horse and rider can't chase down white tailed deer. (Otherwise they would.) I've seen several films of grizzly chasing down deer. The most impressive one had a bear make its own short cut through an eight foot tall blackberry bramble 100 feet across that didn't have a pre-existing path in it, that the deer had to go around. That bramble would have stopped a bulldozer. There was a flying rooster tail of torn vines showing the bear's amazing progress.

    The other impressive film I saw was a large brown bear running at full speed, shot through a telephoto lens. This bear was just flat out flyin'! And he keeps running...and running...and running until the cameraman finally pans back and you see he's on a hill overlooking a plain of some sort and this bear ran at full speed from visual horizon to visual horizon!

    I'm not sure, but I don't think most horses can do that.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,311
    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    Torsten, And with polar bears it's just, "RUN!" if one is inadequately armed.
    Oooh, nononono. That'll get you dead, for sure, because it'll trigger predation - the bear will run you down without even breaking sweat.
    The demonstrated best approach with polar bears is what Nikita Ovsyanikov calls the "walrus defence" - stand your ground, make yourself big, and shout. He should know, because he's faced down polar bears that way in a couple of thousand encounters on Wrangel Island and the Chukchi Peninsula.
    I've also seen it work myself, in a modified form. A small party being approached by a curious bear formed up shoulder to shoulder, waited for the bear to get quite close, and then all stepped forward shouting at the same moment. The bear turned tail and fled at the gallop.

    As ever, though, bears habituated to human presence are difficult to intimidate.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,160
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Oooh, nononono. That'll get you dead, for sure, because it'll trigger predation - the bear will run you down without even breaking sweat.
    The demonstrated best approach with polar bears is what Nikita Ovsyanikov calls the "walrus defence" - stand your ground, make yourself big, and shout. He should know, because he's faced down polar bears that way in a couple of thousand encounters on Wrangel Island and the Chukchi Peninsula.
    I've also seen it work myself, in a modified form. A small party being approached by a curious bear formed up shoulder to shoulder, waited for the bear to get quite close, and then all stepped forward shouting at the same moment. The bear turned tail and fled at the gallop.

    As ever, though, bears habituated to human presence are difficult to intimidate.

    Grant Hutchison
    Somehow this brings to mind the line from Kevin Kline to John Cleese in A Fish Called Wanda "Oh, it's you! I thought you were somebody dangerous for a second..."
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

Similar Threads

  1. My dog gets a new teddy bear...
    By gzhpcu in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 2010-Dec-05, 08:28 PM
  2. To bear or not to bear?
    By Doodler in forum Science and Technology
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 2007-Mar-20, 08:08 PM
  3. Teen repellent wins the Ig Nobel
    By captain swoop in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 2006-Oct-06, 03:12 PM
  4. BA on a Bear?
    By Hale_Bopp in forum Small Media at Large
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 2004-Jun-22, 11:22 PM
  5. Greg Bear
    By Jobe in forum Small Media at Large
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 2003-Nov-13, 08:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •