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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #4051
    Pulled out old copy of Contact last night.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  2. #4052
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    Having just watched Good Omens, I guess I'll re-read the book again, then watch the show again, because that's what I do.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  3. #4053
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    Found a copy of The Maltese Falcon for fifty cents yesterday. It's the only book I've read as an adult that has sent me to a dictionary--though on this read-through, I've discovered either he or the fashion people at the time had misspelled a word.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  4. #4054
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    Finished Mueller's Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election today.

  5. #4055
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    I should probably read that. If they issue it in print, it'd go on my shelf with the Warren Report and the 9/11 Commission Report.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  6. #4056
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    History On Trial, Deborah Lipstadt's account of the libel case brought against her in the British courts by David Irving. The book on which the film Denial was based. While the film took considerable dramatic licence, it does seem to be true to the feel of the book, even if not to the sequence of events or who said what to whom.
    I get the feeling it was written in a bit of hurry, though, and then inadequately proof-read. There are frequent slip-of-the-pen misuses of words--"bravado" for "bravery", "arraigned" for "arrayed", and so on. My favourite is Lipstadt's description of how her grandfather once helped a "monkey grinder" in the park, which conjures up a truly horrific image.

    Grant Hutchison

  7. #4057
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    History On Trial, Deborah Lipstadt's account of the libel case brought against her in the British courts by David Irving. The book on which the film Denial was based. While the film took considerable dramatic licence, it does seem to be true to the feel of the book, even if not to the sequence of events or who said what to whom.
    I get the feeling it was written in a bit of hurry, though, and then inadequately proof-read. There are frequent slip-of-the-pen misuses of words--"bravado" for "bravery", "arraigned" for "arrayed", and so on. My favourite is Lipstadt's description of how her grandfather once helped a "monkey grinder" in the park, which conjures up a truly horrific image.

    Grant Hutchison
    Funny, I just read a book with "History on Trial" as the subtitle. Completely different topic. It is about the various reforms of social studies, post American Civil War to about the early 2000s. It was just ok according to my younger classmates, but I was of the opinion that it was great. I normally hate when "history" encompasses part of my memories.

    There was a significant part about New York State Standards in from 1984 to 1990, which covered my high school years. My school went all meta on the concept and explained what was happening to us and our standards, to the point of offering extra classes, only for the 1990 class. They ran a special trimester series, which was overlaid on a regular quarterly class schedule. It was weird but cool at the same time, like going to college. I recall the best class on ethics being taught by a gym teacher. I hate that guy until I took that class. He should have been a college professor of any subject. He was an absolutely amazing lecturer.

    What took the experience over to the top was that the school had been running an overseas study program in West German and they detected that something was happening in East and West Germany, but not exactly what that thing was. Surprise! No one saw unification coming.

    Recently, I started rereading the Revelation Space series. I am on Chasm City. I think I dislike this one story, but we will see. I can't remember the details enough to remember disliking the last time I read it.
    Solfe

  8. #4058
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    History On Trial, Deborah Lipstadt's account of the libel case brought against her in the British courts by David Irving. The book on which the film Denial was based. While the film took considerable dramatic licence, it does seem to be true to the feel of the book, even if not to the sequence of events or who said what to whom.
    I get the feeling it was written in a bit of hurry, though, and then inadequately proof-read. There are frequent slip-of-the-pen misuses of words--"bravado" for "bravery", "arraigned" for "arrayed", and so on. My favourite is Lipstadt's description of how her grandfather once helped a "monkey grinder" in the park, which conjures up a truly horrific image.

    Grant Hutchison
    I read that book a few years ago and I have either forgotten or missed the "monkey grinder" reference. I assume her grandfather sold "Hot Dogs" to the onlookers as well..

  9. #4059
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I read that book a few years ago and I have either forgotten or missed the "monkey grinder" reference. I assume her grandfather sold "Hot Dogs" to the onlookers as well..
    She also seems to have encountered London taxi drivers who called her "madam". I presume that's a translation or perhaps a mishearing - she was pretty emotionally drained for most of her time in London.

    Grant Hutchison

  10. #4060
    Just finished Contact, gotta figure out what next.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  11. #4061
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    History On Trial, Deborah Lipstadt's account of the libel case brought against her in the British courts by David Irving. The book on which the film Denial was based. While the film took considerable dramatic licence, it does seem to be true to the feel of the book, even if not to the sequence of events or who said what to whom.
    I get the feeling it was written in a bit of hurry, though, and then inadequately proof-read. There are frequent slip-of-the-pen misuses of words--"bravado" for "bravery", "arraigned" for "arrayed", and so on. My favourite is Lipstadt's description of how her grandfather once helped a "monkey grinder" in the park, which conjures up a truly horrific image.
    Another odd one from Lipstadt (to me) is that she describes people "shaking their heads in affirmation". She uses that form of words, twice, then describes someone who shakes their head and says "Yes", and then someone who shakes their head up and down while saying "Yes".
    Is that a thing in the USA? Don't people nod for Yes and shake for No? And if people do shake their heads up and down for Yes, what word does one use for the side-to-side movement for No?

    Grant Hutchison

  12. #4062
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    That seems like strange phrasing. If someone in the US shakes her head it means “no. “

    I worked with a number of people from the Indian subcontinent and for them the head shake could mean “yes” but I also interpreted the movement as “actively listening.”

  13. #4063
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    That seems like strange phrasing. If someone in the US shakes her head it means “no. “
    I also agree it's strange. I'm from the US, and I would always use nod to mean an up and down movement, and shake to mean a sideways "no" one.
    As above, so below

  14. #4064
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    I was reading Jon Mattieu's The Alps: An Environmental History, but I found that I couldn't really get into something with such an academic style for fun so soon after the end of term, so I'm switching to Michael Novacek's Dinosaurs of the Flaming Cliffs. Time to read about the discoveries that were at the time the most recent in my dinosaur books as a six-year-old in full detail!
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  15. #4065
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Another odd one from Lipstadt (to me) is that she describes people "shaking their heads in affirmation". She uses that form of words, twice, then describes someone who shakes their head and says "Yes", and then someone who shakes their head up and down while saying "Yes".
    Is that a thing in the USA? Don't people nod for Yes and shake for No? And if people do shake their heads up and down for Yes, what word does one use for the side-to-side movement for No?

    Grant Hutchison
    Is it a joke?

    I work with people who tend to accept verbal information over social queue like nodding and head shaking, so occasionally I will shake my head "no" while saying "yes" or the other way around. The intent isn't to lie, but to see if someone is paying attention to social queues. It's a trackable goal for some students. Just like making sure they know the difference between Mister, Miss and Missus or knowing to shake hands when offered a hand... or keeping your eyes open when walking or not covering your ears when talking.

    That one is rare and we don't like it because it starts a wave of staff and students either intentionally or unintentionally bumbling around simple answers.

    Anyway back to what I am reading. I picked up The Forge of God by Greg Bear. I read his book, Eon not to long ago and liked it.
    Solfe

  16. #4066
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Another odd one from Lipstadt (to me) is that she describes people "shaking their heads in affirmation". She uses that form of words, twice, then describes someone who shakes their head and says "Yes", and then someone who shakes their head up and down while saying "Yes".
    Is that a thing in the USA? Don't people nod for Yes and shake for No? And if people do shake their heads up and down for Yes, what word does one use for the side-to-side movement for No?

    Grant Hutchison
    I recall in relation to ergonomics, there are tribes where shaking sidewaysmeans yes and in India they have a sideways nod for yes or agree. It was in the context of ergonomic howlers like it is natural that switches use down for on. The writer never visited usa in that case. The point being that these gestures are culturally learned and not instincts. In that vein i have started Darwin, the expression of emotion in humans and animals.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  17. #4067
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    Having not liked The Long Earth and The Long War all that much, I've moved onto The Long Mars anyhow. Apparently Pratchett and Baxter think that Bozeman, Montana, where I spent my college years, is in Idaho.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #4068
    So you are or were a Bozite.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

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