Page 128 of 133 FirstFirst ... 2878118126127128129130 ... LastLast
Results 3,811 to 3,840 of 3964

Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #3811
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,971
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    I always worry about this in my own writing that involves both real and fictional people and fictional people with real accomplishments. For instance, if I have an Olympic athlete who's supposed to have won a silver medal in such-and-such event at the 200X Olympics, will it throw people out of the story when they can very easily look up who DID win the silver medal in that event at those Games and see that it wasn't my character?
    Jed Mercurio had a good, but not easily transferable, solution to this in his novel Ascent, about a Soviet fighter ace who becomes a cosmonaut. Although the character does many things that should have him featuring in the record books, he eventually falls from favour with the Soviet regime, and they expunge all record of his existence.
    (That's not a serious spoiler for the book, but I wouldn't recommend it for your reading list - while Mercurio can write gripping TV drama, his narrative English is horribly clunky, full of strange turns of phrase and very odd metaphors.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  2. #3812
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    30,500
    In the case of the Follett, I suspect it was also the same problem a lot of other people writing about that era have--all of Mary's ladies-in-waiting were also named Mary. Which is also why Mary Tudor the Elder was left out of The Tudors; you couldn't leave out the younger one, and having two Mary Tudors would be confusing. There simply weren't enough names in Tudor England to go around. Or Scotland. Or, based on how many kings of the time were named Henri, France.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  3. #3813
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,013
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    In the case of the Follett, I suspect it was also the same problem a lot of other people writing about that era have--all of Mary's ladies-in-waiting were also named Mary. Which is also why Mary Tudor the Elder was left out of The Tudors; you couldn't leave out the younger one, and having two Mary Tudors would be confusing. There simply weren't enough names in Tudor England to go around. Or Scotland. Or, based on how many kings of the time were named Henri, France.
    Even centuries later, Mary was the most common or second-most-common girl's name in the US every year from 1800 through 1961.

  4. #3814
    A paper on star forming region in Taurus might do a write up on it.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  5. #3815
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    4,330
    Timescape by Gregory Benford. I found a review that raved about it and remembered I had a copy that I never read. So I read it and it is about the end of the World due to some pesticides introduced in the sixties. Very uncomfortable reading thinking about plastics in the oceans these days!

  6. #3816
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    11,522
    I reread Creating a Common Table in Argentina and The Workers Go Shopping in Argentina. Both books are very good, they could almost be companion titles. The second covers the life of Dona Petrona and is fascinating.
    Solfe

  7. #3817
    Got a free ebook about red dwarfs and habitable planets because I was listening to the latest Weekly space hangout.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  8. #3818
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  9. #3819
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    1,053
    Lawrence in Arabia by Scott Anderson, its 600 or so pages could be distilled down to "Lawrence good and always right, other British bad and always wrong, Arabs meh, Turks dashing but evil, US oil company duplicitous." There are some odd ideas in it, since Anderson clearly doesn't understand the Indian Army or that the various Balkan Wars were wars of liberation rather than conquest. Lawrence is about to head into the Hejaz so I'll see if it gets any better.

  10. #3820
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,971
    Finding Longitude, which the Greenwich Museum published in 2014 for the tercentenary of the British Longitude Act.
    It's a nicely balanced (and copiously illustrated) account of the eighteenth-century attempts to "solve the longitude problem". A fine antidote to Dava Sobel's supposed "true story" on the same topic, which was essentially a work of historical fiction.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  11. #3821
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    30,500
    Flipped through Reactions, by Theodore Gray. As always with his books, striking photography.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  12. #3822
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,013
    Quote Originally Posted by Heid the Ba' View Post
    Lawrence in Arabia by Scott Anderson, its 600 or so pages could be distilled down to "Lawrence good and always right, other British bad and always wrong, Arabs meh, Turks dashing but evil, US oil company duplicitous." There are some odd ideas in it, since Anderson clearly doesn't understand the Indian Army or that the various Balkan Wars were wars of liberation rather than conquest. Lawrence is about to head into the Hejaz so I'll see if it gets any better.
    That’s a shame to hear, I got it at a book festival a few years ago and have been meaning to read it when I get through with everything else on my list. Should I not bother reading it at all?

  13. #3823
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    760
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Finding Longitude, which the Greenwich Museum published in 2014 for the tercentenary of the British Longitude Act.
    It's a nicely balanced (and copiously illustrated) account of the eighteenth-century attempts to "solve the longitude problem". A fine antidote to Dava Sobel's supposed "true story" on the same topic, which was essentially a work of historical fiction.

    Grant Hutchison
    I have read, and enjoyed, Sobel's book.I certainly don't have enough knowledge to realistically check its accuracy but also I don't recall any controversy about its veracity. A quick google also didn't seem to find any particular trend of criticism in that regard. Can you point me to some further reading - I am always fascinated with wandering down intersting little rabbit (or my case wombat) holes.
    Last edited by ozduck; 2018-Apr-12 at 05:26 AM.

  14. #3824
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    1,053
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Thatís a shame to hear, I got it at a book festival a few years ago and have been meaning to read it when I get through with everything else on my list. Should I not bother reading it at all?
    It is worth reading but with certain caveats. It is very well researched and some of it is fascinating but Anderson is still of the "butchers and bunglers" school when scholarship has moved on to a more rounded view of Great War generals. He also blankly states that had the British followed one of Lawrence's suggestions, a naval landing at Alexanderetta in Syria, the Ottoman Empire would have collapsed, a theory on shaky ground at best. Anderson misses the nuances of the Indian Army getting caught up in it being white officered and "colonial" so intrinsically bad, while not realising that tens of thousands of the men and NCOs were Muslim so ideal for deployment to a sacred Muslim area. These points matter little to most people but exercise me more than they probably ought to.

    What he is good at is not taking Lawrence at face value and considers the possibility that he is an unreliable narrator. Anderson is also good so far on the interaction of the US representatives of SOCONY and the Turkish authorities though repeatedly describing William Yale as an aristocrat does grate. I'm about a third of the way through the book and the scene has been nicely set up though there have been various digressions into things which don't concern Lawrence at all and while interesting up to a point, they don't really belong in a book called "Lawrence in Arabia". It is as if the author pitched a different book about spying and espionage but was told it would sell without Lawrence's name and face on the cover.

  15. #3825
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,971
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I have read, and enjoyed, Sobel's book.I certainly don't have enough knowledge to realistically check its accuracy but also I don't recall any controversy about its veracity. A quick google also didn't seem to find any particular trend of criticism in that regard. Can you point me to some further reading - I am always fascinated with wandering down intersting little rabbit (or my case wombat) holes.
    There was huge popular enthusiasm, combined with a largely unheard little rumble of dissent from historians of science. Sobel "dramatized" events by transforming what was actually a nuanced story into a fantasy of Harrison as working class hero vs. Maskelyne as academic elite villain, she repeated unsupported anecdotes as if they were fact, she omitted key information at specific points in the narrative so that she could patronize Newton and Maskelyne by suggesting they didn't understand the longitude problem, and she conducted a cheap war of insinuation against Maskelyne throughout the story. I found it a singularly nasty little tome.
    Sobel's a bit of a serial offender in this regard - her A More Perfect Heaven contains an embedded play that completely distorts the relationship between Copernicus, Rheticus and Dantiscus. Again, she's trying to create pure heros and nasty villains, again by means of character assassination, but at least on this occasion it is labelled as a dramatization.
    If you want an academic critique of Sobel's Longitude there's an interesting one here (200KB pdf). Note that Charney is a professor of Rhetoric and Writing, rather than a historian, but I think she sums up quite nicely the problems created by skewed popular accounts like Sobel's.
    For a balanced narrative of Harrison and his timekeepers, I do thoroughly recommend Finding Longitude, if you can lay hands on a copy. (In their "Further Reading" section they generously describe Sobel's book as "a quick read that gives the story from John Harrison's perspective". I'd say she not only buys into the paranoid stories told by Harrison and his son, she works hard to build on them.)
    Howse's Greenwich Time And The Discovery Of The Longitude is also a good read.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  16. #3826
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    760
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    There was huge popular enthusiasm, combined with a largely unheard little rumble of dissent from historians of science. Sobel "dramatized" events by transforming what was actually a nuanced story into a fantasy of Harrison as working class hero vs. Maskelyne as academic elite villain, she repeated unsupported anecdotes as if they were fact, she omitted key information at specific points in the narrative so that she could patronize Newton and Maskelyne by suggesting they didn't understand the longitude problem, and she conducted a cheap war of insinuation against Maskelyne throughout the story. I found it a singularly nasty little tome.
    Sobel's a bit of a serial offender in this regard - her A More Perfect Heaven contains an embedded play that completely distorts the relationship between Copernicus, Rheticus and Dantiscus. Again, she's trying to create pure heros and nasty villains, again by means of character assassination, but at least on this occasion it is labelled as a dramatization.
    If you want an academic critique of Sobel's Longitude there's an interesting one here (200KB pdf). Note that Charney is a professor of Rhetoric and Writing, rather than a historian, but I think she sums up quite nicely the problems created by skewed popular accounts like Sobel's.
    For a balanced narrative of Harrison and his timekeepers, I do thoroughly recommend Finding Longitude, if you can lay hands on a copy. (In their "Further Reading" section they generously describe Sobel's book as "a quick read that gives the story from John Harrison's perspective". I'd say she not only buys into the paranoid stories told by Harrison and his son, she works hard to build on them.)
    Howse's Greenwich Time And The Discovery Of The Longitude is also a good read.

    Grant Hutchison
    Thanks Grant for a very comprehensive reply. It looks like I have some interesting reading ahead.

    EDIT: I have found some copies of "Finding Longitude" in my state library system and have put in for an inter-library loan so I will hopefully soon be able to read it.
    Last edited by ozduck; 2018-Apr-12 at 01:09 PM.

  17. #3827
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,971
    Just to give you an example of the aspect of Sobel's book that I particularly dislike, I dug out my copy to check her description of Maskelyne's static trial of Harrison's H-4 Watch.
    Some say Nevil Maskelyne's ill will hexed the Watch, or that he handled it roughly during daily winding. Others avow that he intentionally distorted the trial.
    "Some"? "Others"?
    It was at that precise point I chucked the book across the room when first reading it.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  18. #3828
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    760
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Just to give you an example of the aspect of Sobel's book that I particularly dislike, I dug out my copy to check her description of Maskelyne's static trial of Harrison's H-4 Watch.
    "Some"? "Others"?
    It was at that precise point I chucked the book across the room when first reading it.

    Grant Hutchison
    I have just finished a first read of Davida Charney's very interesting paper which certainly does not paint Sobel's book in a good light. I was also intrigued that in her paper she seemed,to me at least, to be adopting/adapting the "Two Cultures" thesis of C.P. Snow in regards to the denigration of the actions of the Board of Longitude & Maskelyne by Sobel. By this, I mean that she, Charney, praises the scientific inclusiveness and information sharing of Maskelyne compared to Harrison's secretive and combative approach. Sobel is instead portrayed as adopting the "little man" fighting unaided against the "scientific establishment" theme of popular culture in order to write an exciting book.

    However, I am always worried that I will fall into that old trap of agreeing with the last seemingly convincing argument that I have heard, so I look forward to reading "Finding Longitude".

  19. #3829
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,971
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    However, I am always worried that I will fall into that old trap of agreeing with the last seemingly convincing argument that I have heard, so I look forward to reading "Finding Longitude".
    Finding Longitude certainly tries to tell the story in a "big picture" kind of way, trying not to come down on either side of Harrison's argument with the Board of Longitude (though at one point it does describe the Board being "at the end of their tether" with Harrison).
    Fundamentally, I think, it comes down to differing interpretations of what the words "practicable and useful" meant in the original 1714 Longitude Act, Did the existence of one very complicated and expensive chronometer (H-4), which had undoubtedly performed well in a small number of trials, but the mechanism of which was being kept a trade secret by an elderly man, count as a "practicable and useful" solution to the general problem of finding longitude, involving thousands of ships? If (like Harrison and Sobel) you think it does, then the behaviour of the Board seems like an obstructionist case of "continuously moving the goalposts". If you think that it falls short of that goal, then Harrison seems to have been more than a little naive, and (towards the end of the affair) his own worst enemy.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  20. #3830
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    760
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Finding Longitude certainly tries to tell the story in a "big picture" kind of way, trying not to come down on either side of Harrison's argument with the Board of Longitude (though at one point it does describe the Board being "at the end of their tether" with Harrison).
    Fundamentally, I think, it comes down to differing interpretations of what the words "practicable and useful" meant in the original 1714 Longitude Act, Did the existence of one very complicated and expensive chronometer (H-4), which had undoubtedly performed well in a small number of trials, but the mechanism of which was being kept a trade secret by an elderly man, count as a "practicable and useful" solution to the general problem of finding longitude, involving thousands of ships? If (like Harrison and Sobel) you think it does, then the behaviour of the Board seems like an obstructionist case of "continuously moving the goalposts". If you think that it falls short of that goal, then Harrison seems to have been more than a little naive, and (towards the end of the affair) his own worst enemy.

    Grant Hutchison
    At the very least reading the book will make make me stretch my mind. While I am very happy in my retirement a bit of hard thinking and weighing up arguments will be good for me.

  21. #3831
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    13,746
    I'll have to see if I can get Finding Longitude for Kindle. And perhaps re-read Sobel's version, if I can find it.

    What I'm now reading is Pratchett's Truckers. It's taken me a little while to get into it, but, of course, humans are slow. This is the first non-Discworld Pratchett I've read other than Good Omens.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  22. #3832
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,971
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'll have to see if I can get Finding Longitude for Kindle. And perhaps re-read Sobel's version, if I can find it.
    There's a Kindle version in the UK, but I guess you may not be able to get that from US.

    On another thread you mentioned how the TV movie had Maskelyne dropping instruments, which is a story Sobel (of course) tells in her book.
    Finding Latitude fingers William Harrison, John Harrison's son, as the source of this story. William made many unsubstantiated claims about Maskelyne and others - he suggested that both Maskelyne and Bradley were after the longitude prize for themseves, for instance, but there's no evidence either of them ever applied for it. Maskelyne appears to have looked on the production of lunar tables as part of his job, for the public good. He only ever seems to have lobbied for relatively small awards for other people - Euler and Mayer, both of whom had made very significant contributions to Maskelyne's ability to prepare his lunar charts. Interesting that it was felt appropriate to disburse British public money to a German and a Swiss under these circumstances.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  23. #3833
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    13,746
    Indeed, I didn't find it here for Kindle. I may look for a dead-tree version.

    I finished Diggers, the second of Pratchett's Bromeliad series, yesterday. They are kids/YA books and don't take all that long but I'm very much enjoying them.

    ETA: Yikes! Someone wants US$1131.08 for Finding Longitude! I don't think so.
    Last edited by Trebuchet; 2018-Apr-15 at 04:03 PM.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #3834
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,971
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    ETA: Yikes! Someone wants US$1131.08 for Finding Longitude! I don't think so.
    I think you'll find better buying options with the book's US title, Ships, Clocks, and Stars: The Quest for Longitude. (Which was the name of the exhibition at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich for which the book was printed.) I'm always puzzled and intrigued when publishers give the same book different titles in the UK and US.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  25. #3835
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    13,746
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I think you'll find better buying options with the book's US title, Ships, Clocks, and Stars: The Quest for Longitude. (Which was the name of the exhibition at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich for which the book was printed.) I'm always puzzled and intrigued when publishers give the same book different titles in the UK and US.

    Grant Hutchison
    Oh! I saw that and didn't realize it was the same. Thanks!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #3836
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    16,971
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Oh! I saw that and didn't realize it was the same. Thanks!
    It's actually the same painting on the cover, but they conceal that pretty well by changing the brightness, contrast and cropping. Again, I'm left puzzling over the reason for that, but it may be something as simple as accommodating the new cover text.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  27. #3837
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    13,746
    Bought now with one click! $9.99. Read now!

    And since I've just finished the Bromeliad trilogy, I know what I'll be reading next.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  28. #3838
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,013
    Whenever I see a Three Investigators book at a used bookstore, I buy it because I read most of the series in Elementary through High School, as did my Dad back in the 60s, so it's nostalgic for both of us. As such, I am currently reading The Mystery of Death Trap Mine, because I found it at Strand a few weeks ago. Unlike some other children's mysteries, I still find the writing holds up at conveying a sense of place-- in this case, a fictional, nearly-dead, mining town in the US Southwest.

    (By the time I graduated High School, I had read all of the books in the series that our High School library had in its [incomplete] collection, up to #38 of the whole 43-book original series. Now that I've gotten into reading them again, maybe I can do a big re-read project when I go home for the summer if the High School still has the books-- and read the final ones I never got to read, too!)
    Last edited by KaiYeves; 2018-Apr-16 at 04:47 AM.

  29. #3839
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    760
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Bought now with one click! $9.99. Read now!

    And since I've just finished the Bromeliad trilogy, I know what I'll be reading next.
    I am avoiding buying it because if I get a book and enjoy it I find it very difficult (can't) sell or pass it on. My wife will testify to the already excessive numbers of books in our house and she certainly doesn't want any more permanent residents.

  30. #3840
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    13,746
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I am avoiding buying it because if I get a book and enjoy it I find it very difficult (can't) sell or pass it on. My wife will testify to the already excessive numbers of books in our house and she certainly doesn't want any more permanent residents.
    That's why I've switched to Kindle. When we were moving a couple of years ago I did a massive purge and got rid of several hundred books. It hurt a bit, but not as badly as I expected. That doesn't mean there aren't a couple of hundred still here, of course.

    When I opened the back of the car, the guy at the Goodwill donation station said "Oh! We LOVE books!"

    One thing I may need to do on this one is download it to an actual computer so I can view the illustrations better than on the phone.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

Similar Threads

  1. Re-reading
    By Trebuchet in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 75
    Last Post: 2014-Mar-14, 10:28 AM
  2. What are you not reading?
    By Paul Beardsley in forum Small Media at Large
    Replies: 182
    Last Post: 2013-Sep-30, 06:36 PM
  3. What keeps you reading?
    By Paul Beardsley in forum Small Media at Large
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 2009-Jun-17, 02:49 PM
  4. Reading Age
    By Sticks in forum Phil Plait's Bad Astronomy
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 2008-May-09, 03:59 PM
  5. Reading computer screen is easy than reading books
    By suntrack2 in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 2006-May-27, 12:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •