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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #451
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Regarding the contractor model, the overarm system comes with a couple of extra parts: two L-brackets and bolts for mounting the tubing clamps to the rails used for the standard fence option. The tubing clamps mount directly to the the rails used for both the premium and T-glide fence options.

    And I just found out something of note while refreshing my memory on the fence options. The contractor saw has table mounted trunnions and based on a few forum posts, it offers pain of adjustment similar to other contractor saws.
    You've pretty much convinced me to buy the cabinet version.

  2. #452
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    I think you might be as enamored of it as I am of mine. If only I got a kickback...and not of the tablesaw variety.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  3. #453
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    Here's a bit of a departure from saws & wood...

    I have a long narrow room that really should have two ceiling light fixtures, one closer to each end of the room, but only has one in the middle. To get both turning on & off with the same switch, which only has one set of wires running to one place right now, I originally thought of connecting one light fixture to the switch and adding a new set of wires from the first fixture to the second light fixture. So my original questions were going to be about whether those murrets (I have no idea how it's really spelled; I've just heard it said; I mean those twisting caps you use to hold the ends of two wires together when neither is connected to anything else) can functionally handle having three wire ends in them instead of two, how to choose the right kinds of wires to add for the several feet between the two future light fixtures, and what other options I might have that I wasn't thinking of.

    Then I took a look at the wiring that's already up there. Holy wow. There are three wires apiece from the switch and the light fixture, but they didn't just connect one of each to one of the other. The bare metal one from the light fixture just ends without connection to anything else, and two from the switch are connected to the same one from the light fixture; I presume the dangler is a ground wire and the switch's ground wire is one of the two that are connected to each other, but why? Why not just connect ground to ground? Could that be related to the fact that the one from the switch looks significantly thicker so their resistances wouldn't match?And there's more! Both of the insulated wires from the light fixture, instead of being connected straight to their counterparts from the switch, are actually connected to shorter extra bits of wire, just a few inches long, which are actually connected to the ones from the switch. So instead of three murrets or whatever they're called, there are five places where it looks like murrets were supposed to be used, three of which actually have them, whereas the other two seem to have tape wrapped around them instead (presumably because somebody was working with a kit that only had three). There's plenty of slack in the main wires from both directions, so the extra bits just a few inches long aren't there to bridge a gap that isn't there, so why else would somebody want them there?

  4. #454
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    We'd call your " murrets" "wire nuts". And they can certainly have three wires.
    Beyond that you are looking at dangerous amateur wiring.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  5. #455
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    Wire nuts are sized as to the application, and are often spelled out on the box. A good pair of pliers
    will help to secure them properly. If you have any doubts, call an electrician.

  6. #456
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    ...

    IAnd there's more! Both of the insulated wires from the light fixture, instead of being connected straight to their counterparts from the switch, are actually connected to shorter extra bits of wire, just a few inches long, which are actually connected to the ones from the switch. So instead of three murrets or whatever they're called, there are five places where it looks like murrets were supposed to be used, three of which actually have them, whereas the other two seem to have tape wrapped around them instead (presumably because somebody was working with a kit that only had three). There's plenty of slack in the main wires from both directions, so the extra bits just a few inches long aren't there to bridge a gap that isn't there, so why else would somebody want them there?
    If any of those connections are not in a proper enclosure they are totally illegal in the USA. How old is this mess? Where are you located?

    And by all means, consult a licensed electrician.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  7. #457
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    I was just in a hobby shop today, wistfully browsing the plastic models, brushing my hands over the Revell and Monogram boxes, like old friends from my youth.

    I've got a couple kits squirreled away in my room for decades. The one I want to do is kitbash a pair of 1/144th scale F86 Sabres into this little biplane of my own design (I think I may have posted this here earlier):

    It'll be a challenge. Gotta move the landing gear forward to make it biplane configuration. Gotta move the cockpit back. (That'll be a tougher challenge than adding the extra wing.)

    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2018-Jan-15 at 12:17 AM.

  8. #458
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    My life is a lie.


    This is a C82.




    This has been in my room awaiting being made into a diorama for about 20 years:

    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2018-Jan-15 at 01:17 AM.

  9. #459
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    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    Wire nuts are sized as to the application, and are often spelled out on the box.
    So, one that's meant for only two wires can't fit three?

    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    A good pair of pliers will help to secure them properly.
    So, once you've twisted it down onto the wires, you squeeze it with the pliers to deform it around the wires?

    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    If you have any doubts, call an electrician.
    I'm not sure I can, since I don't own the building. And whoever the landlord would call might be on the same level as the one who did this in the first place. But I'm not worried about that. I've replaced wall switches and sockets myself before, which is fundamentally the same thing, just with screws you hook the wires around and then screw down. The only part that's new to me here is twisting wires into wire nuts instead of hooking them around screw posts, and I've actually seen people use them before, just not had them in my own hands. And the wire set coming through the ceiling has three wires, and the new light fixtures I could buy now have three wires, so it's just a matter of matching up one to one, the same as if nothing weird had ever been done before. (I'll just need to find out which of the two that are combined in the present configuration is which.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    If any of those connections are not in a proper enclosure they are totally illegal in the USA. How old is this mess? Where are you located?
    Pennsylvania. (Moving to the Northwet remains a dream I still can't afford yet.) I don't know how long it's been wired this way. It was this way when I moved in about 9 years ago. The wires' insulation has a lot of dust on it, which would seem to have been pretty slow to accumulate, given the location in a place that gets practically no air from the outside. Actually, the arrangement reminds me of something else that I've always known was a bit strange about this light fixture and another reason why I need to replace it (other than being in the middle of a long room so the ends are significantly less lit than the middle), so maybe this was a sign all along that the wiring would probably be weird too. The ceiling is a drop ceiling with 2'◊4' tiles. The original plaster ceiling has a hole in it through which the wires from the switch come out. The light fixture is attached not to that ceiling but to the middle of the room's middle tile, so, in order to see the wires running from the original ceiling to the fixture in the drop ceiling, I need to get a flashlight and lift a neighboring tile. And that alone might not have caught my attention and made me decide to replace the light fixture if not for two other oddities that are related to it: the present fixture's weight has caused an obvious downward bulge in the tile, and it's a recessed lighting fixture, with the bulb socket so deep inside that it would only light a circle a few feet wide in the middle of the room, if two of this type of adapter/extender weren't added in there to hold the bulb actually outside the hole and below the level of the ceiling tile. Apparently, the last time anything was done with this room's ceiling light, somebody just grabbed whatever light fixture they already had sitting around at the time instead of thinking about what kind of fixture would make the most sense in this room, and stuck it in the middle of the tile that was already there rather than buy a sturdier 2'◊4' board to hold it.

  10. #460
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    One of the first projects I plan for the new saw, is a project for the new saw: an outfeed table. It's based on a design by Chris Marshall, published in the February 2009 edition of Wordworker's Journal. It can also be found at the Rockler website.




    I think I've about got it tweaked to my saw's dimensions and clearances. One issue was the dust collection attachment. After almost finalizing the model, I realized that about 6 or 7 inches of the hose and coupling wouldn't fit under the table. I started making modifications, then suddenly had a head-smacking idea. I went out to the shop (garage), removed the overarm, then mounted the tubing brackets upside-down, which gave me the clearance I need...I think. I'll have to cut a test block to be sure. But that won't hold me up from the next step...procuring materials. I'll start that tomorrow when The Wife and I are in town on errands/shopping.
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  11. #461
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    So, once you've twisted it down onto the wires, you squeeze it with the pliers to deform it around the wires?

    I'm not sure I can, since I don't own the building. And whoever the landlord would call might be on the same level as the one who did this in the first place. But I'm not worried about that. I've replaced wall switches and sockets myself before, which is fundamentally the same thing, just with screws you hook the wires around and then screw down. The only part that's new to me here is twisting wires into wire nuts instead of hooking them around screw posts, and I've actually seen people use them before, just not had them in my own hands. And the wire set coming through the ceiling has three wires, and the new light fixtures I could buy now have three wires, so it's just a matter of matching up one to one, the same as if nothing weird had ever been done before. (I'll just need to find out which of the two that are combined in the present configuration is which.)
    (as for the bold part) NO! You twist the wires (and I hope dearly we're talking solid core wire here) together so their twist forms something like a screw thread. That's the part you need the pliers for. Then you put the pliers down and with your bare hands you screw the nut onto your wire twist. Twist and screw direction should be such that the nut keeps the twist together; I tend to give the twist left-hand thread for this reason.

    But if this is new and challenging to you, there is something a lot easier today and that is WAGO splicing connectors. Strip wire, hold in connector, close connector. Repeat for next wire. I never use wire nuts anymore, the WAGO's are easier and faster.

    http://www.wago.us/products/terminal...ries/overview/

    I case of doubt, call electrician.

  12. #462
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    My house is an electrical death trap. I broke a ceiling fixture in the basement. It a 2 dollar, 2 minute fix. I took down the fixture only to find a snarl of wires, more than 10. The funny bit was, the light was supposed to be on it's own switch... but that light switch also turned off the wall clock in the kitchen. That's right, turning off the basement light stopped the clock.

    It took over a month for me to work out that mess and finally fix it. I say a month not because I am slow, but because I had to convince my wife that a non-powered compass rose in place of the wall clock was a good idea.
    Solfe

  13. #463
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    My house is an electrical death trap. I broke a ceiling fixture in the basement. It a 2 dollar, 2 minute fix. I took down the fixture only to find a snarl of wires, more than 10. The funny bit was, the light was supposed to be on it's own switch... but that light switch also turned off the wall clock in the kitchen. That's right, turning off the basement light stopped the clock.

    It took over a month for me to work out that mess and finally fix it. I say a month not because I am slow, but because I had to convince my wife that a non-powered compass rose in place of the wall clock was a good idea.
    PS - She still hates the compass rose slightly less than burning to death. I sold her on it by buying matching painting to go on either side of the compass rose. The rose and the paintings share colors and style. The paintings came down in December, so I think we are looking at remodeling the kitchen. That is how my wife hints at stuff.
    Solfe

  14. #464
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    (as for the bold part) NO! You twist the wires (and I hope dearly we're talking solid core wire here) together so their twist forms something like a screw thread. That's the part you need the pliers for. Then you put the pliers down and with your bare hands you screw the nut onto your wire twist. Twist and screw direction should be such that the nut keeps the twist together; I tend to give the twist left-hand thread for this reason.

    But if this is new and challenging to you, there is something a lot easier today and that is WAGO splicing connectors. Strip wire, hold in connector, close connector. Repeat for next wire. I never use wire nuts anymore, the WAGO's are easier and faster.

    http://www.wago.us/products/terminal...ries/overview/

    I case of doubt, call electrician.
    Agreed , I'm a convert and keep a selection to hand, and they are approved USA and europe too.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  15. #465
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    So, one that's meant for only two wires can't fit three?

    So, once you've twisted it down onto the wires, you squeeze it with the pliers to deform it around the wires?

    I'm not sure I can, since I don't own the building. And whoever the landlord would call might be on the same level as the one who did this in the first place. But I'm not worried about that. I've replaced wall switches and sockets myself before, which is fundamentally the same thing, just with screws you hook the wires around and then screw down. The only part that's new to me here is twisting wires into wire nuts instead of hooking them around screw posts, and I've actually seen people use them before, just not had them in my own hands. And the wire set coming through the ceiling has three wires, and the new light fixtures I could buy now have three wires, so it's just a matter of matching up one to one, the same as if nothing weird had ever been done before. (I'll just need to find out which of the two that are combined in the present configuration is which.)

    Pennsylvania. (Moving to the Northwet remains a dream I still can't afford yet.) I don't know how long it's been wired this way. It was this way when I moved in about 9 years ago. The wires' insulation has a lot of dust on it, which would seem to have been pretty slow to accumulate, given the location in a place that gets practically no air from the outside. Actually, the arrangement reminds me of something else that I've always known was a bit strange about this light fixture and another reason why I need to replace it (other than being in the middle of a long room so the ends are significantly less lit than the middle), so maybe this was a sign all along that the wiring would probably be weird too. The ceiling is a drop ceiling with 2'◊4' tiles. The original plaster ceiling has a hole in it through which the wires from the switch come out. The light fixture is attached not to that ceiling but to the middle of the room's middle tile, so, in order to see the wires running from the original ceiling to the fixture in the drop ceiling, I need to get a flashlight and lift a neighboring tile. And that alone might not have caught my attention and made me decide to replace the light fixture if not for two other oddities that are related to it: the present fixture's weight has caused an obvious downward bulge in the tile, and it's a recessed lighting fixture, with the bulb socket so deep inside that it would only light a circle a few feet wide in the middle of the room, if two of this type of adapter/extender weren't added in there to hold the bulb actually outside the hole and below the level of the ceiling tile. Apparently, the last time anything was done with this room's ceiling light, somebody just grabbed whatever light fixture they already had sitting around at the time instead of thinking about what kind of fixture would make the most sense in this room, and stuck it in the middle of the tile that was already there rather than buy a sturdier 2'◊4' board to hold it.
    Hi Delvo, No plier squeezing. The pliers simply grip the wire nuts so that you can effectively tightened them properly. And.... professionals never re-use them. They are replaced new.
    Pay attention to how you strip each wire. In practice, it's simple enough. And in the work box, always use a green grounding screw .
    And Nicholas is right. You want the wires twisted together before you put on the wire nut.
    Properly installed, they hold everything together quite well.
    Last edited by danscope; 2018-Jan-15 at 06:59 PM.

  16. #466
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    Properly installed, they hold everything together quite well.
    This sums it up. The good thing about wire nuts is that when properly installed, they form an excellent connection. The really bad thing about them, is that you can do so much wrong resulting in an unreliable/dangerous connection. You can't do much wrong with WAGO's, as long as you don't strip the wires ridiculously far.

  17. #467
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    One of the first projects I plan for the new saw, is a project for the new saw: an outfeed table. It's based on a design by Chris Marshall, published in the February 2009 edition of Wordworker's Journal. It can also be found at the Rockler website.
    Do you think this design is superior to that offered by Sawstop? Or are you going this route because it's cheaper or perhaps because you prefer building stuff yourself (a sentiment, if true, that I totally understand)?

  18. #468
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    All three. It will cost less than the better option and I will have made it. The less expensive Sawstop outfeed ($99) is appears to be light duty and doesnít work with the mobile base. Their folding outfeed is $299 and the tabletop is largely an open framework. Thatís okay for sheet good but it practically invites smaller work pieces to fall through.
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  19. #469
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    This is nothing compared to the talented efforts by others in this tread, but I'm proud of it. I attached paneling to the living room wall, and my wife is pleased with the results.

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  20. #470
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    I like. I want a feature wall like that in our new house. It seems to be outside the builder's comfort zone.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #471
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    I like that wall. We have some cedar T&G paneling that we bought a long time ago but changed our mind on the plan for it. I might put it in the office or the living room ceiling.
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  22. #472
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    Yes, that's a nice wall. I'm a fan of doing things a bit different with one or two walls.

  23. #473
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    One of the first projects I plan for the new saw, is a project for the new saw: an outfeed table. It's based on a design by Chris Marshall, published in the February 2009 edition of Wordworker's Journal. It can also be found at the Rockler website.

    I made a start on the outfeed table blank last weekend by cutting two oversized pieces of ĺĒ MDF, gluing them to double the thickness, and driving screws in a 4Ē grid to apply even clamping pressure. Once dry, I removed the screws and filled the holes to prevent them from telegraphing through the laminate.

    I also had to do some maintenance on my crosscut sled to fit it to my new saw, since the miter slot and blade spacing were slightly different. I filled the saw kerf with West Systems epoxy and filler and left it to cure.

    Yesterday, I smoothed out the patched kerf and cut the new one. I double checked squareness with a couple of test cuts and Iíll be darned if it wasnít dead on. Color me shocked. I thought for sure Iíd have to tweak the fence.

    With the sled back in commission, I cut the blank to final dimensions and laminated one side with matte black Formica before calling it a day. I had to declare it to be the underside because an unnoticed piece of schmutz was trapped under the laminate, making a subtle pimple. Fortunately, laminating the top today was without incident:



    I bought a few boards of maple Friday so next session, Iíll start milling the edge pieces.
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  24. #474
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post

    I bought a few boards of maple Friday so next session, I’ll start milling the edge pieces.
    I'm somehow surprised you didn't just cut down a tree.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #475
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm somehow surprised you didn't just cut down a tree.
    Nope. No bandsaw mill, no kiln, and no time to wait for it to air dry. And our native hardwoods arenít as hard as I would like for this project.
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  26. #476
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    PS - She still hates the compass rose slightly less than burning to death. I sold her on it by buying matching painting to go on either side of the compass rose. The rose and the paintings share colors and style. The paintings came down in December, so I think we are looking at remodeling the kitchen. That is how my wife hints at stuff.
    I’d probably have to hunt to find a new wall clock that needs an outlet. All the ones I see for sale use a single AA battery.

    Using one of those battery-powered clocks means she gets a clock and doesn’t need to worry about watching the house go up in flames.

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  27. #477
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    Just a little more progress on the outfeed table: after milling the stock, I glued the front and rear edging to the tabletop; glued up the side edging and hinge blocks and trimmed them to rough size. The small piece is a routing template for the hinge blocks. Gluing up the edges drove me to finally buy the 1.25hp compact router Iíve been eyeballing for a long time. I used it to flush trim the edging and man, it was so much nicer than trying to balance the 2.25hp Dewalt on a narrow edge.

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  28. #478
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    I spent some time in the shop this morning making slow progress on my outfeed table:



    I glued up the side edging, trimmed it with the compact router, pattern routed the hinge block profile, and trued everything up with a block plane and a card scraper. Iíve still got some sanding to do.
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  29. #479
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    This weekend, I made some progress on the outfeed table support arm. It’s a kind of sliding dovetail affair that will be hinged at the underside of the table. The sliding piece will engage a lip attached to the backside of the saw and will be secured with a barrel bolt. I still have some shaping, trimming and sanding to do before I move on to making the hinge bracket.



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  30. #480
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    I am taking a breather from sanding some drywall joints where a gable ceiling in an unfinished upstairs utility room goes down to the eaves. I was lying flat on my back to work in the low places. I just imagined that I was Michelangelo doing prep work in the Sistine Chapel. I was wearing protective goggles and a respirator mask, so I could let the sanding dust fall in my face with impunity. I just now looked in a mirror and my hair looked almost completely gray.

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