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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #601
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    Adventures in DIY

    Just Married! After I got my honey-dos done today (most of them, anyway) I united the chassis with the base, then mounted the iVac remote switch and wiring box. And this brings us to the bonehead move of the day.

    I bought a snazzy yellow, single receptacle to matchy-match the iVac switch but the home centers didn’t have a single hole box cover. So, I bought a blank cover to make my own. I measured the receptacle diameter at 1-3/8”, carefully drew my layout lines, chucked up a Forstner bit in the press, and neatly drilled a hole, perfectly centered in the cover...a 1-5/8” hole. Dang it. I knew I should’ve bought two.

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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  2. #602
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    Looks nice.

  3. #603
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    Fancy stuff!

    I fired up the metal lathe for the first time ever yesterday. Reduced an M10 rod partially to 7.70mm and tapped M8 thread on that end. My lathe could cut the thread as well, but as a starter I'm not comfortable yet with lathe thread cutting, especially close to the chuck. This nifty M10 to M8 rod will be used to mate a collet chuck to the backing plate of the lathe.

    I'm still at the start of the learning process. The first rod I used was very hard steel, didn't work that well. Next rod was softer. The first thread I cut I did with the rod vertically. Now I do it horizontally, which allows me to see much better whether I'm tapping square or not.

  4. #604
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    Mechanical engineer nitpick: At least in the USA, only internal threads are "tapped". External threads are just threaded.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  5. #605
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    Indeed, taps for internal and dies for external although a lathe can cut either. The "best" ie strongest threads are not cut but rolled, this gives better grain flow and also work hardens the metals (in those kind of alloys).
    sicut vis videre esto
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  6. #606
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Mechanical engineer nitpick: At least in the USA, only internal threads are "tapped". External threads are just threaded.
    That's correct. I have a knowledge and language barrier to overcome here. In Dutch, it's "tapping" for internal (with a tap) and "cutting" for external (with a die, called a "cutting cushion" here). With a lathe, we call it all "cutting" or in long form "threadcutting".
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2018-Oct-01 at 06:23 PM.

  7. #607
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    I'm not sure you can do rolled internal threads, but yes, absolutely best for external. Best for the mass-producer, too, as there's no waste. You just form the portion of the bolt to be threaded to the proper diameter in the previous step, so although the tooling is more expensive it's best in the long run. Not something we home-gamers can do, of course.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #608
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    No, I'm not aiming to be able to do that at home.

    Normally I'm picking up a sturdy drill press this week. At the moment I have one of those holders for a regular drill, but they have so much play that it's useless. I could use the mill as a drill press, but drill presses come so cheap it's easier to just have both.

  9. #609
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    I love my inexpensive Ryobi drill press. It was the first bench-top power tool I ever purchased and is still the most used. Except maybe the miter saw.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #610
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I love my inexpensive Ryobi drill press. It was the first bench-top power tool I ever purchased and is still the most used. Except maybe the miter saw.
    Ditto on that. My Sears Craftsman benchtop drill press has served me well for over three decades.

  11. #611
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    That might be a fun idea for a thread: "My oldest tool still in use". I know I have some that I've used for maybe close to 40 years, including a hammer and a crosscut saw. My grandfather was a machinist and I got some of his tools. I've been using the micrometer for probably 30 years or more, and I assume he used it for decades before that.
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  12. #612
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    That might be a fun idea for a thread: "My oldest tool still in use".
    "Brain."



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    Solfe

  13. #613
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    Well, "tool", I play the Bosendorfer grand daily and that one is about 120 years old... I have some electronic synthesizers getting close to 50 years old now.

    I must have some hammers that are at least 50 years old, possibly a lot more. I don't know how old my mill is, but I expect it to be at least 40 years if not a lot more. Many of the tools I did not buy new, so I can only guess at the age if there is no brand or anything on it.

    Being Belgian, I'll add that I've made waffles on an electrical waffle iron (do you call them that in English?) from the 1940's.

  14. #614
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Originally Posted by Swift
    That might be a fun idea for a thread: "My oldest tool still in use".
    "Brain."



    We're a science website... you had to see that coming.
    I said "still in use".
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  15. #615
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I said "still in use".
    Do you make moonshine with it?

    When I first got out on my own, probably 45 years ago, I bought a cheap ratchet/socket set, probably at K-Mart. I still have and use it. It's the travelling set, rides around in a tool bag in the car and goes to the Pumpkin Pitch. Still have all the parts and it works just fine.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #616
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    Well, tonight truly was an "adventure" in DIY. I went to pick up the drill press. I'd only seen it on unclear pictures before. In real life it turned out to be a quite large model, and very sturdy on top of that. The drill press itself is 1 meter tall and mounted on a small cabinet, making it about 1.60 meter tall in total. As said, very sturdy. Not these modern 150W souped up soup mixers, but a fat 1/2 HP electromotor. You don't find them much larger than this in single phase AC version, beyond they tend to go to three phase industrial power, which I don't have in this house. It's got nice functions: clear vernier on the vertical axis (on first sight I think in mm but in a direction that is not always the most logical one: 0 = drill fully down), table can move vertically, swing sideways, and by the looks of an extra vernier it can also be turned at an angle to the drill. I haven't found how to unlock that axis yet, but as it's nicely perpendicular now I'll only try the suspected bolt when I need it. And I'll give it a reference line to read the vernier, which is absent at the moment. It's also got a built-in lamp. It's belt driven; gear driven ones again tend to be the industrial power ones.

    So, what was the adventure part? I had to unload that beast myself. No help, no cart of any sort. In other words: a bit of my Hulklike strength and a bit of the Easter Island approach: after managing to get it out of the car without losing the rear bumper, I "walked" it all the way into the workshop. Good workout.

    Anyway, great addition to the workshop for a few tenners.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2018-Oct-05 at 08:09 PM.

  17. #617
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    Pictures or it didn't happen!

    Oh, wait -- I'm in default on both house and Pumpkin Pitch pictures.

    Oh, and are there any leveling feet on the bottom of the drill press cabinet? Hope so.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #618
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    I figured the vertical vernier out about 1 second after I realized I had not yet found a depth stop. The vernier dial and depth stop are one and the same thing. You set the vernier to the depth reach that you want to have, lock it and done. Which also results in the direction of its scale being very logical. I hadn't seen this system before, so I failed to figure it out last night.

    There are currently no feet, never mind leveling feet, on the bottom of the cabinet. I'll make something in due time so I can put it firmly on the ground. I don't think it's really important to have it absolutely level (we have these things on our ships where they move 3° to either side all the time), as long as it's standing firmly on the quite uneven floor (now it can tilt a bit if you push it left or right, so that's not good).

    This is more or less the same model as I have:

    https://images.bva-auctions.com/stat...640x480/43.jpg

    The only difference is that that one has added pneumatic depth control. Mine hasn't, though the shaft is prepared for it from factory. Which goes to show that it was a tool aimed at the more professional applications.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2018-Oct-06 at 12:28 PM.

  19. #619
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I said "still in use".
    "Braaaiiins!"
    Solfe

  20. #620
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    That might be a fun idea for a thread: "My oldest tool still in use". I know I have some that I've used for maybe close to 40 years, including a hammer and a crosscut saw. My grandfather was a machinist and I got some of his tools. I've been using the micrometer for probably 30 years or more, and I assume he used it for decades before that.
    I still use my fathers "Footprint" pipe wrench wrench which was old when I first saw it 60 years ago. My brother has my fathers old Australian made Lightburn Electric Drill with a metal body which still works and is at least 70 years old. There are also all sorts of hand drills, crosscut saws, tree wedges, leather hammers etc that we have kept that are well over 90 years old and still perform their functions perfectly.

  21. #621
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    I'm informing myself a bit on sheet metal tools. I have a question about shears. If you want to make a tray, you have to cut out square pieces in the corners, where your side walls are going to bend upright. My question is: can you cut out those corner pieces (so cuts with a length that is less than the entire width of the sheet) with the shear in a tool like this:
    https://www.hbm-machines.com/product...knipcombinatie

    Or do you need an open-ended shear for that like this:
    https://www.hbm-machines.com/product...andplaatschaar
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2018-Oct-06 at 05:49 PM.

  22. #622
    Eventually this cabin has to be moved, it is on a woodlot now owned by my sis and BIL and this where they want to put there lawn when they build their house there, right now it is a target for people to vandalize and break into, help build it 25 years ago.
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  23. #623
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    That looks like a very nice location. I wouldn't mind having a cosy cabin there.

  24. #624
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    That spot does indeed look very nice and right up my alley as well.

    I had hoped to spend some time in the shop working on the dust collector mod but it appears that the hydraulic pump in my saw’s mobile base has issues. After 8-10 pumps of the foot pedal, it tops out with the weight barely being taken of the extension legs. Purging the pump has no effect. So I’ll have to contact the manufacturer next week for a fix/replacement. So I spent some time attending to other chores.

    First, I disassembled a non functioning carpet shampooer that I replaced recently so it would fit in the trash can.

    Next, I changed all of the switches in one 2-gang and one 3-gang switch box. Four of them were 3-way switches for the interior lights. My garage lights switches were behaving a bit wonky. They sometimes would come on unless I wiggled a switch on the other wall. The last time I changed switches in the house, I had the foresight to buy contractor packs so I didn’t even have to make a run to the home center. I even had new switch plates on hand, to boot.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  25. #625
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    Is this a hydraulic pump that came with the saw-stop? Have you added much weight to it? Is there an adjustable relief valve? Noticed any leakage?
    You can take the engineer out of the hydraulics department, but you can't take the hydraulics out of the engineer.
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  26. #626
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    It’s really just a small bottle jack that’s part of the separate mobile base. The base was designed for SawStop’s heavier Industrial Cabinet Saw, so it shouldn’t have trouble with my model. There’ve been no signs of leakage and the fluid level checked out fine.

    SawStop has a reputation for good customer service and standing behind their products. Tuesday will tell.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  27. #627
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    Overdue update on the SawStop: I called customer service last week and after asking me a few questions about the problem and what steps I had taken to troubleshoot the problem, they sent out a new jack, FedEx 2-day...which is 3-day shipping to my house. I installed it last weekend and all is well.

    And now, an updatier update on the dust collector upgrade: I still have a couple of things to finish but I mounted the plenum and motor on the chassis and it is now operational.



    It hums along quite nicely and having the installed remote control is a very nice convenience.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  28. #628
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    My son made this discovery - our salt lamp has a plastic removable base to change the lightbulb. Our Blu Tooth enabled LED nightlight has a removable sparkly liquid top. He swapped to salt portion of the lamp for the liquid filled top on the nightlight. It is a very cool looking lamp. Now I have to figure out away combine the two in a more permanent configuration. See video below.

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/9KxW1QWpVD9SNQ3m6
    Solfe

  29. #629
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    There's no finish on it, and it's made from three different kinds of scrap I had in the garage, but the new dust funnel for my faithful old radial arm saw is a big improvement over the old one.



    And that's mainly because instead of having a shop vac attached, I have the new dust collector that arrived in the mail (!) last week.



    So far, I'm liking it.

    Hey Brett, besides improving the efficiency of dust collection, was the fact that big stuff in the air flow isn't removed before meeting the fan part of the motivation to build your dual cyclone system?
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  30. #630
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Hey Brett, besides improving the efficiency of dust collection, was the fact that big stuff in the air flow isn't removed before meeting the fan part of the motivation to build your dual cyclone system?
    That was a indeed a major benefit of adding the dust separator. When using the jointer or planer, shavings would frequently jam up at impeller screen. I also had to take care not suck up small wood scraps when using the hose for cleanup.

    When I got the system all put together, there was just a bit of sawdust in the plastic bag. After working on Kroger’s urn box yesterday and today, using the table saw, jointer, and planer and cleaning up hand plane shavings, there was no more discernible dust in it than when I started. This setup should also give me more service between filter cleanings.

    If you’re of a mind to, I do recommend replacing the felt filter bag with a canister filter. As I recall, that bag is rated at 2.5 μm so it’s letting through the stuff that is most hazardous to your lungs. The canister also offers about 10 times the filter area, so you’ll get the most out of your 1 hp motor.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2018-Nov-08 at 08:01 PM.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

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