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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #871
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    Question about bearing bits: the bearing pushed quite a dent into the soft wood I was routering (freehand, no guide). It didn't feel to me as if I was pushing really hard. Could it be that those glorious Chinese bearings can't keep up with the router at high RPM settings and slip against the wood a bit, causing the dent?

  2. #872
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    I have a recollection of being annoyed by a line left by the bearing in softer wood, but a light sanding removed it. But I can't recall if it was with the kind of bit that has permanently affixed bearings or the detachable ones. I'm not really sure of the range in quality of my bit collection. The newer ones are so inexpensive compared to the earliest ones I bought.

  3. #873
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    Yes, a line indeed. Some sanding removed it, though the sanding took longer than the cutting (what is the verb for using a router anyway?) itself.

  4. #874
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    Adventures in DIY

    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I'm not really sure of the range in quality of my bit collection. The newer ones are so inexpensive compared to the earliest ones I bought.
    For the most part, Iíve been trying to ďbuy once, cry onceĒ in the router bit department...when I can, anyway. Especially true when I have the choice between a 2-wing cutter and a 3- or 4-wing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    (what is the verb for using a router anyway?)
    Routing or more generically, milling.

    This was a pretty productive 3-day weekend in the shop for me. This project seems to have been plagued by mis-cuts more so than others but by the end of the weekend, I put them behind me. Going into the weekend, I completed the handle cutouts:



    And just a while ago, a dry fit of the main box components:



    Next, Iíll sand all of the interior surfaces, then pre-finish them with the beeswax recipe, and glue them up. After than, Iíll fit the lid and foot pads.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  5. #875
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    Interestingly, "buy once, cry once" was also the original slogan of the Drug Enforcement Agency's undercover division.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  6. #876
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    I like the look of the joints in the corners.

  7. #877
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I like the look of the joints in the corners.
    Thanks. I like them in the style...kind of a stripped down A&C look.

    This weekend I got the interior sanding done. Tedious but still satisfying. I used a random orbit sander on the flats, 150 through 220 grit, and hand sanded the handle cutouts on the same schedule. Then I masked off the glue surfaces on a few pieces and applied the wax finish. Itís an attractive color on its own but I still intend to fume the pieces.

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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  8. #878
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    This weekend I got the interior sanding done. Tedious but still satisfying. I used a random orbit sander on the flats, 150 through 220 grit, and hand sanded the handle cutouts on the same schedule. Then I masked off the glue surfaces on a few pieces and applied the wax finish. Itís an attractive color on its own but I still intend to fume the pieces.
    I'm looking forward to the next installment.

    I did some work on the floats a few weeks ago.

    Underside detail:


    I've shaped the struts that connect the floats to the airframe. The details of how they connect at each end are tricky. I started carving one end of one strut to fit into a hole that will be drilled into a float, and I think it's gone well, but the whole assembly will require some precise work. And that means just the right amount of coffee in me and state of mind to complete.

    Here, a rough jig to help understand and guide how the pieces will fit together:

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  9. #879
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I'm looking forward to the next installment.

    I did some work on the floats a few weeks ago.

    Underside detail:
    Very nice. How did you go about modeling the strakes?
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  10. #880
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Very nice. How did you go about modeling the strakes?
    It was a long process. The profile drawing from the operating manual was useful, but insufficient. I used online photos of Edo 2960 or 2870 floats for guidance.

    First, I cut and sanded the bottoms, flat across, to establish the profile of the keel and step.


    From the profile drawing, I was able to establish the angle from the keel to the side for the aft portion, and from the main keel to the secondary keels. I marked a line on the sides and ground it down. I dragged a razor blade down the length of each face so that the surface was really flat, and penciled the location of the secondary keels. This established the keel-to-keel angle for the inner strake. I don't know what this blading process is called, but it's akin to screeding concrete.



    Then, another line was drawn on the side of the hull representing the edge of the outer strake, and the process was repeated for that section.



    I went about it slightly differently for the second float, deciding to set the angle at the bow before setting the angle for the outer strake. For the portion forward of the step, I used a small diameter round file to begin the hollowing between the keels. I finished with ever finer sandpaper rolled into whatever diameter was required until the keels were sharply defined.





    cont...
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  11. #881
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    ...cont

    The hollowing aft of the step was started with a half round file, but that was only good to a point, because the radius changes continuously from the step to the stern, and I couldn't cut right up to the step in any case. I used a polymer sanding film by Testors which could be rolled up, and could get right into the corner of the step without breaking down. It was all about the "feel" of the curves once I switched from filing to sanding.
    (I used the same product to sharpen the line where the windshield meets the fuselage.)



    The holes where the spreader bars (I think that's what they're called) fit were drilled through the clamped-together blanks on a press before any cutting began. This was to ensure that the hulls would align identically later on. They were widened with a Dremel later.



    I had to make a filler of glue and sanding dust to fill the gaps visible here. There are stiffeners on the upper surface of the floats, either side of the inspection covers on the real thing, and I decided to show this detail, but in reverse, by cutting two lengthwise grooves. Not in this picture, but you can barely see one of them post 878.



    Well, that was fun. I wasn't sure if I'd ever tell that part of the story. Of course, the further along I get, the more worried I am that I will destroy it.
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    Last edited by Torsten; 2019-Jun-04 at 04:05 AM.

  12. #882
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    No,, I'm nowhere near it--so it's safe.

  13. #883
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    I've claimed a drawer cabinet for use in my workshop, so I can store the end mills, measurement tools etc in it. No, it's no workshop cabinet but a clothes cabinet. But hey, if it(s for free... Now actually there was absolutely no space left in my workshop to place anything, but then I found a way to make it work anyway. Now I only have to find space for old struts (which I keep for their hard steel shafts) and a toolkit that are floating around. The rest of the workshop is cleaned up again.

    And I've spent the rest of the night on the drill press and the mill making some extra wide, flat jaws for the vice. I'll use those when I have to mount magnetic tools in the vice. Those tend to hold quite weakly, so these jaws should help.

  14. #884
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    Adventures in DIY

    Just when you thought I was done with the finger joint jig...

    Because the ends of finger joints on the boxes are just a little proud of the surface, I canít clamp them directly and get pressure on the fingers themselves. So I set about making some cauls, four of them, to allow for gluing up one box at a time.

    Each if made up of two pieces. I milled up some Douglas fir lumber, cut the finger joints, and glued them together.




    After the glue fully cures, Iíll clean them up, cut them to length, and proceed with glue-up of the boxes.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  15. #885
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    That's some very nice precision woodworking.

    Anyone have experience using Super Blue to blacken quite large surfaces of metal? It's a large "pancake" air filter lid. I don't want to heat it intensely for oil blackening, as I fear it might warp or become too brittle for its shaky environment.

  16. #886
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Just when you thought I was done with the finger joint jig...

    Because the ends of finger joints on the boxes are just a little proud of the surface, I canít clamp them directly and get pressure on the fingers themselves. So I set about making some cauls, four of them, to allow for gluing up one box at a time.
    Is there a reason you couldn't clamp the panels immediately adjacent to the finger joints, using blocks to distribute the pressure evenly? I feel like I'm not understanding the problem. Or were you looking for any reason to use that jig...

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Anyone have experience using Super Blue to blacken quite large surfaces of metal? It's a large "pancake" air filter lid. I don't want to heat it intensely for oil blackening, as I fear it might warp or become too brittle for its shaky environment.
    I've used blue on a couple of rifle barrels, but it was so long ago that I don't even remember the process.

    _______________

    For some time I've pondered how to make my camera more readily accessible when I'm on a motorbiking trip. In the past I've stored it in a duffel bag behind me, so whenever I want to pull it out, there are bungies and extra zippers to deal with. There are many tank bags available on the market, but none have appealed to me. I finally thought of a solution: Make an adapter to attach my camera bag to the tank using magnets.

    In the collage below, the flat piece of pressboard fits in a pouch on the back side of the camera bag. The holes in the horseshoe-shaped tank adapter match those in the bag pouch adapter and each hold a neodynium disc magnet. Although I painted and lacquered the tank portion, I ended up sealing it inside heat shrink tubes and using mounting tape to attach it to the tank.

    The connection is firm enough for riding down rough roads and also doesn't release in a rapid stop, but it I can simply pull the bag off when I need it. The magnets don't affect the camera, and there's enough room in the bag for my phone, wallet and a few other things. Colour me happy!



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  17. #887
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    Adventures in DIY

    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Is there a reason you couldn't clamp the panels immediately adjacent to the finger joints, using blocks to distribute the pressure evenly? I feel like I'm not understanding the problem. Or were you looking for any reason to use that jig...
    Yes...and yes.

    If you clamp inboard of the joints, especially on longer and/or thinner box sides, it can cause the piece to bow inward. With the notches acting as a fulcrum, the outside ends of the fingers can lift slightly, causing gaps and weaker glue joints. The cauls will put pressure only where itís needed. Additionally, Iíll only have to use three corner strap clamps, rather than eight bar clamps.

    Using the finger joint jig again was a bonus.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  18. #888
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    And here the first glue-up in the clamps/cauls:



    It took some planning and two dry runs to get the process down without needing six hands but the glue-up went reasonably well. I used liquid hide glue for its long open time, since there are so, so many glue surfaces to cover.

    The cauls worked pretty much as designed but the wood was really too soft for the application and some of the fingers on one compressed a bit too much for my liking. Before assembling the other box, Iíll make another set from poplar or soft maple.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  19. #889
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    Very nice. All that preparation pays off in an elegant setup.

    I had thought that there might be a possibility of the joints lifting if clamped in the manner I described, but I didn't think it would be significant. And I'd likely be disappointed in the result.

  20. #890
    Both the hot and cold taps on the bathtub have gone. Fixing the hot water today because it is the easiest to get to the cut off valve. But the it hasn't been replace in long long time so it was hard to get out, had to use wd-40 and tried two pairs of vice grips, the second one had a better spring. And of course someone bought the wrong size she they have to go back to the store and get the right one.
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  21. #891
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    Catching up a little. Before taking a short trip to Homer last weekend, I flushed up the box joints and sanded the exteriors to 150g. Final sanding to 220g will come later. This morning, I milled the skids, pre-finished them, and glued them in place.



    Tomorrow, I’ll start milling the lids for the tissue compartments..
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2019-Jul-07 at 05:47 PM. Reason: missing word
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  22. #892
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    As promised, I milled the lids today and routed a decorative edge profile. They still need to be sanded, then Iíll cut the hinge mortises. After that, itís down to final sanding, finishing, and fuming.



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  23. #893
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    I like that veneer-thin vertical detail at the top. Elegant.

  24. #894
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    Took me a minute to figure out what you were seeing. Thatís where the fillet cutting portion of the router bit just kissed the surface. Itís almost hair-thin and will get sanded out. I considered cutting a fillet detail, but wanted to keep the edge treatment on the simple side.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  25. #895
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    I had wondered whether that was intended to be sanded out, but it looks so uniform I thought it was a design detail. Whenever I've managed that, it's been somewhat uneven.

  26. #896
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    That grain is already lovely, can't wait to see it fumed.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #897
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    Adventures in DIY

    Iím out of practice hand cutting hinge mortises. Even with a couple of trial runs, my first two mortises are a touch loose. I started off by applying painters tape at the hinge locations to make the layout lines easier to see. I measured their locations and cut their outlines with a marking knife and a marking gauge.





    Since the width of the hinges leaves a very narrow strip of wood, I clamped a backing block behind it to prevent blow out. To hedge my bets further, I struck a chisel line a little short of the finished width. The remainder was to be carefully pared with a chisel.



    The bulk of the material was removed in several passes with a router plane. The grain was a little squirrelly so a combination of long grain, cross grain, and skew cuts were made.



    I then drilled screw holes and this is where todayís frustration came in. See the empty screw hole? The brass screws included with the hinges are soft, while white oak is pretty darn hard. So, a stronger steel screw was also included to pre-thread the holes. Well, that broke off in the hole. I now need to order a wood screw extractor to make that right.

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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  28. #898
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    So you broke off a steel screw in a pre-drilled hole? That is some manly oak you've got there!

  29. #899
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    I don't think it was my not-so-manly forearms but it was a #4 screw, after all.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  30. #900
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    And now for a completely different kind of DIY, I've just finished reassembling the motorcycle after checking valve clearances. I don't much enjoy doing anything other than oil and tire changes on this bike because everything is so tightly packed in. To check the valve clearances requires removing much of the fairings, the fuel tank, air cleaner, radiator, coolant reservoir, crash bars, and disconnecting the associated plumbing and wiring. And after all that, I discovered the clearances were in spec for all eight valves, so the shim kit I bought wasn't touched. At least I can rest easy now. And I replaced the plugs and air filter while I was in there, so those'll be good for the upcoming trip.

    There were no parts left over and it runs!

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