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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #631
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    Another quick and low cost modification: apply a band of foam tape where the plastic collection bag attaches to give a better seal there. I used 1-1/4 x 3/16 weather seal tape.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  2. #632
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    Adventures in DIY

    And speaking of that urn box...I went with a different design for this one to be made of curly maple, cherry, and morado.



    I got the carcass put together yesterday and added the cherry trim today. I also milled some morado for the top and bottom moldings.



    The Wife and I will be in town tomorrow and I plan to pick up some baltic birch plywood for the top and bottom panels. Ill apply some shop-made maple veneer to the former.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2018-Oct-29 at 07:00 PM.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  3. #633
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    Shop-made veneer? As in you made it?

  4. #634
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Shop-made veneer? As in you made it?
    I will. Ive resawn slices as thin as 1/32 at the band saw but I plan this one to be a little thicker...perhaps between 1/16 and 1/8. To make it easier in this case, Ill glue the stock to the substrate first.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  5. #635
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    I got an interesting little anomaly from Tapatalk yesterday. A post by someone called "Bret Luna" on a woodcrafters board I had never visited showing a little box remarkably like yours! Interesting.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #636
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    I will. I’ve resawn slices as thin as 1/32” at the band saw but I plan this one to be a little thicker...perhaps between 1/16 and 1/8”. To make it easier in this case, I’ll glue the stock to the substrate first.
    So, cut a slice off with the bandsaw, glue it to the substrate and run it through the planer?

  7. #637
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    My wife - a photographic artist with frequent exhibitions - asked that I build her a custom storage rack for her numerous framed prints. I realized fairly quickly that to do what she wanted, I needed my router table set up. I had given away the one I had when we relocated to Oregon (it was not a good table) and was intending to buy one next year, along with the table saw. So, an acceleration of plans. I considered both the Rockler and Kreg tables as they're pretty similar, except Rockler offers a cast-iron top, which would be nice but expensive and perhaps a bit more than I need. This was delivered today:

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  8. #638
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    So, cut a slice off with the bandsaw, glue it to the substrate and run it through the planer?
    My plan is to glue the thick stock to the ply substrate first so its easier to clamp, then resaw, glue on a couple of shepherd pieces and run it through the planer.

    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    This was delivered today:

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    I have that very table. Are going with the stock router plate?
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  9. #639
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    After my focus on the metalworking side of things (still busy with that, I've got an order in the waiting list :-)) I've happened to stumble over a good deal for the woodworking side of things. First project: modifying a table saw so that I can safely and accurately use it by myself when sawing large pieces. I've already made a better push stick and a featherboard. Next project is a zero clearance insert. Not so much for the zero clearance aspect, but mainly because the current one is more loose than students on spring break.

    I've also had to do some ham-fisted work on the table: it's a rather simple model, where the 90 stop for the blade is fixed. Over the years, some sagging (it's a high power machine with a very heavy motor...) caused the blade to be at less than 90. So I had to file the guides longer to allow the blade to be set nicely at 90 again. I just hope there is no gyroscopic force pulling it away from 90 when I switch it on; I'll have to do some test cuts to see if 90 stationary is still 90 during sawing.

    The insert will be an interesting job: quite tight tolerances on the outer dimensions, I'll have to file steps in it to slide under the metal deck, I'll have to make and mount metal springs on one side for the locking mechanism, and I'll have to use my planer to get the right thickness. I haven't had time to buy a dust collector yet, so that will be lovely. Also, I can't use the table saw yet to make the table saw insert, so I'll have to be a bit creative there too. Two opposite cuts with the miter saw and passing over the jointer to finish to size or something like that.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2018-Oct-30 at 10:48 AM.

  10. #640
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post

    I have that very table. Are going with the stock router plate?
    For now. I may buy the lifting plate in the future.

  11. #641
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    After my focus on the metalworking side of things (still busy with that, I've got an order in the waiting list :-)) I've happened to stumble over a good deal for the woodworking side of things. First project: modifying a table saw so that I can safely and accurately use it by myself when sawing large pieces. I've already made a better push stick and a featherboard. Next project is a zero clearance insert. Not so much for the zero clearance aspect, but mainly because the current one is more loose than students on spring break.

    I've also had to do some ham-fisted work on the table: it's a rather simple model, where the 90 stop for the blade is fixed. Over the years, some sagging (it's a high power machine with a very heavy motor...) caused the blade to be at less than 90. So I had to file the guides longer to allow the blade to be set nicely at 90 again. I just hope there is no gyroscopic force pulling it away from 90 when I switch it on; I'll have to do some test cuts to see if 90 stationary is still 90 during sawing.

    The insert will be an interesting job: quite tight tolerances on the outer dimensions, I'll have to file steps in it to slide under the metal deck, I'll have to make and mount metal springs on one side for the locking mechanism, and I'll have to use my planer to get the right thickness. I haven't had time to buy a dust collector yet, so that will be lovely. Also, I can't use the table saw yet to make the table saw insert, so I'll have to be a bit creative there too. Two opposite cuts with the miter saw and passing over the jointer to finish to size or something like that.
    What sort of table saw do you have?

    "More loose than students on spring break" LOL

  12. #642
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    With every project, there's the inevitable QC inspection.

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  13. #643
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    You don't crush your cans?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #644
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    You don't crush your cans?
    The recycling people here say they don't want them crushed. Maybe so they can sell me more of the green bags.

  15. #645
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    The recycling people here say they don't want them crushed. Maybe so they can sell me more of the green bags.
    that is odd, we used crushed but maybe the separation process works better uncrushed. Some use magnets to take out the steel but the sorters I have seen use basically linear motors to shoot the aluminium off the belt. Others use density in water floatation separators. There is a lot of variation.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  16. #646
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    that is odd, we used crushed but maybe the separation process works better uncrushed. Some use magnets to take out the steel but the sorters I have seen use basically linear motors to shoot the aluminium off the belt. Others use density in water floatation separators. There is a lot of variation.
    These bags aren't for general municipal recycling. Oregon has a state-mandated recycling program which includes a ten cent deposit on each can or bottle. You drop the bags filled with empties off at the recycling place, they count the cans and bottles and deposit money into your account. Each bag has a scan code sticker on it with my account info.

  17. #647
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    What sort of table saw do you have?

    "More loose than students on spring break" LOL
    I've got an older model branded Tendo Tools, which basically is a Chinese model with some options. Which in turn is extremely similar to the (I don't know which one is the copy, or if they both are the same base table) Makita 2712. The price was right, the motor powerful/blade large and the lengthened table allows me to rip door frames by myself. But apart from that, it's not a "pride of ownership" kind of machine like some of my other tools are. It's a budget workhorse, nothing special.

    The Makita version has a bolted down insert; mine is just clamped. And the clamping spring is slightly broken. So a new, tight fitting wooden one with a new spring. If required I'll see if I can somehow bolt it down.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2018-Oct-30 at 09:20 PM.

  18. #648
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    These bags aren't for general municipal recycling. Oregon has a state-mandated recycling program which includes a ten cent deposit on each can or bottle. You drop the bags filled with empties off at the recycling place, they count the cans and bottles and deposit money into your account. Each bag has a scan code sticker on it with my account info.
    Oh, that makes a difference. Are they actually counting them, or going by volume, which would explain the no-crushing policy.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #649
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Oh, that makes a difference. Are they actually counting them, or going by volume, which would explain the no-crushing policy.
    I believe they're counting them. I have no idea why they don't want them crushed.

  20. #650
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    Perhaps they separate them into their own ultra crusher that can't handle cans that are already crushed in a non-parallel way?

  21. #651
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    That was a indeed a major benefit of adding the dust separator. When using the jointer or planer, shavings would frequently jam up at impeller screen. I also had to take not suck up small wood scraps when using the hose for cleanup.
    I managed to suck in a small wood scrap yesterday and expected to find it hung up on a screen, but all I see ahead of the fan is a coarse grate and the chunk made it past that. Hmmm.

    If you’re of a mind to, I do recommend replacing the felt filter bag with a canister filter. As I recall, that bag is rated at 2.5 μm so it’s letting through the stuff that is most hazardous to your lungs. The canister also offers about 10 times the filter area, so you’ll get the most out of your 1 hp motor.
    I think that's a good idea.

    One of the things I'm really pleased about is that the machine is much quieter than the shop vac. I've been using it for general cleanup too. I bought the reducer so that I can use the shop vac attachments and make easier connections to my other tools. But I was using it with my bench sander the other day, and all I did was put the 4" hose near the port on the tool and it worked fine.

  22. #652
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    With every project, there's the inevitable QC inspection.

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    Is the cat included with it, or did you have to pay extra for that accessory?

    Actually, the QC inspector is thinking "You forgot to put sides on my new box. This will never do."
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  23. #653
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    Adventures in DIY

    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I managed to suck in a small wood scrap yesterday and expected to find it hung up on a screen, but all I see ahead of the fan is a coarse grate and the chunk made it past that. Hmmm.
    That grate is what I was earlier referring to as a screen. Screen. Grate. Its a spectrum.

    I bought the reducer so that I can use the shop vac attachments and make easier connections to my other tools.
    I use my DC to clean up the table saw top but for general shop cleaning, I use my cyclone-enhanced shop vac. Im impressed that your reducer works well for you. With the smaller hose, static pressure goes up but air flow drops pretty dramatically. Ive been considering 4-inch vacuum wand accessories from Rockler.

    More progress with Krogers urn this weekend. I squared up one end of the box body, set it on the saw table, and placed his ashes in it to determined the height I needed for a comfortable fit. The top and bottom take a little of the volume, so after adding for those, I trimmed it to final size.

    Next, I laminated three pieces of 1/4-inch model makers plywood along with a piece of curly maple for the top panel. Once dry, I trimmed it to rough size, trimmed the excess thickness from the maple, glued on a couple of shepherd pieces, and planed it to finished thickness, resulting in a 1/16-inch thick maple veneer. I then cut it to final size, to fit the inside of the box.

    I set up a 1/4-inch dado stack, partially buried in a sacrificial fence, and milled a 3/16-inch tongue centered along one edge of the morado top trim pieces. Then using a flat top rip blade, I cut a slot in the top panel to fit that tongue. And thats where I left off today.


    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2018-Nov-05 at 12:02 AM.
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  24. #654
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    I've given myself another lovely job this weekend: my planer/jointer also has a sanding attachment, using the large round sanding papers with an adhesive backing that you stick on a metal disc. That disc has been in use for 36 years now, collecting layer upon layer of backing. I've brought it back to bare metal. Joy!

    I've been able to make the zero clearance insert for the saw table, so now the table is finished and ready for use. First task will be door frames. I may want to buy a dust collector first.

  25. #655
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    Years ago I bought a unique "vase" turned from a birch burl that had partially rotted after being somehow damaged.
    There's a goofy little corner where my living room wall accommodates the flues that exit my furnace/hot water utility room.
    I decided to use this space to display the vase, so made a corner shelf from some birch scraps left over from a half-round table I built five years ago.



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  26. #656
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    That grate is what I was earlier referring to as a screen. Screen. Grate. Its a spectrum.


    I use my DC to clean up the table saw top but for general shop cleaning, I use my cyclone-enhanced shop vac. Im impressed that your reducer works well for you. With the smaller hose, static pressure goes up but air flow drops pretty dramatically. Ive been considering 4-inch vacuum wand accessories from Rockler.
    If I attach the reducer to the 4" hose while the motor is on, the hose recoils wherever there is enough room for it to move. But the 2" connectors at the ends of my shop vac hose are broken and I haven't yet found any replacements for them. It would work better otherwise.

    Next, I laminated three pieces of 1/4-inch model makers plywood along with a piece of curly maple for the top panel. Once dry, I trimmed it to rough size, trimmed the excess thickness from the maple, glued on a couple of shepherd pieces, and planed it to finished thickness, resulting in a 1/16-inch thick maple veneer. I then cut it to final size, to fit the inside of the box.
    "Shepherd pieces". I like that that term.

  27. #657
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    Torsten, that looks awesome! Must have been some tricky lathe work making that vase with the hole in it.

    As for dust collection:
    I am, of course, totally hapless compared to you guys. But I do have three or four bench power tools with connections for dust collection. Let's see, chop saw, band saw, router table, and ... maybe that's it. All made, or at least sold, by Ryobi. But none of the connections are the same size, and none match either my shop vac or the regular vacuum hose.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  28. #658
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    I've tried out my modified saw table this week. The goal was to be able to cut long pieces by myself in a safe and accurate way. Mission accomplished: the new cut is as straight and clean as a factory cut, and i've never felt so safe and in control with a saw table. Especially the featherboard helps a lot with guiding and prevents kickback, which is highly unlikely anyway with the nicely set up knive and guide.

    Somewhat less happy news: the new door frame is just a bit too wide for the hole in the wall, so that will require some chiseling and loads of red dust. Sigh, I thought I'd passed that stage years ago. Let's hope the remaining 4 doors will have large enough openings.

  29. #659
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Torsten, that looks awesome! Must have been some tricky lathe work making that vase with the hole in it.

    As for dust collection:
    I am, of course, totally hapless compared to you guys. But I do have three or four bench power tools with connections for dust collection. Let's see, chop saw, band saw, router table, and ... maybe that's it. All made, or at least sold, by Ryobi. But none of the connections are the same size, and none match either my shop vac or the regular vacuum hose.
    In my experience, other than power sanding, it's a table saw that puts the most dust into the air. The router produces a prodigious amount of debris but it tends to be bigger than dust size. Tends to be.

    If you're worried, you might want to consider an overhead room dust collector. I have one and it seems to help.

  30. #660
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Years ago I bought a unique "vase" turned from a birch burl that had partially rotted after being somehow damaged.
    There's a goofy little corner where my living room wall accommodates the flues that exit my furnace/hot water utility room.
    I decided to use this space to display the vase, so made a corner shelf from some birch scraps left over from a half-round table I built five years ago.
    Very nice.

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