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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #541
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    For my next DIY project, I'm trying to repair one of my Altec Lansing Model 6 speakers. The midrange silent. I already tried swapping the speaker out for it's twin in the other unit, but no go. So now I'm replacing the capacitors on the crossover circuit. These speakers are not designed to be easily repaired, I think. The case, which is super sturdy, doesn't come apart, so I had to break off the four plastic retainers to get at the circuit board from the front. Trying to access it through the woofer hole was also a no go. I'll replace the plastic retainers with wood screws. Hope the capacitor replacement does the trick because I think I'll have to enlist professional (read: expensive) help if it doesn't. These speakers, which are about 40 years old, sound really great when paired up to a good system, such as my equally ancient Kenwood receiver.
    Didn't work. Now I'm sad. As much as I like these speakers, it's probably not worth shipping them somewhere to be refurbished.

  2. #542
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I might have a bit of overkill in the dust collection setup (or the way it was and will be setup): a cyclone separator driven by a Jet two-bag vacuum that takes a 4" suction on whatever I run the hose to, plus an overhead room dust collector that has an inlet prefilter, a fine multi-cell bag filter, and an outlet filter, which doesn't really do much.
    I use the vac for small tool dust collection and general clean up. I also have a 1 hp, single-bag, dust collector for the larger tools. I was planning on buying a new Laguna DC with this year's dividend but it looks like we'll be spending that on a new well pump instead. So, I've been thinking about modifying my current DC with a the Super Dust Deputy 4" kit and replacing the bag with a pleated filter.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  3. #543
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    I use the vac for small tool dust collection and general clean up. I also have a 1 hp, single-bag, dust collector for the larger tools. I was planning on buying a new Laguna DC with this year's dividend but it looks like we'll be spending that on a new well pump instead. So, I've been thinking about modifying my current DC with a the Super Dust Deputy 4" kit and replacing the bag with a pleated filter.
    I perhaps used a confusing word: vacuum. It's actually a Jet DC-650 dust collector. But it's essentially a semi-mobile vacuum and I've used it for general shop cleanup in that capacity - I just reduce the hose size to 2" and use my shop vac hose for greater reach. It works pretty well with the barrel separator, which has a cyclone-like top fitted inside.

  4. #544
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    I have three tools with dust collection ports, none of which are the same size or fit any vacuum fitting I can find. I've located my chop saw out in the covered patio.

    In the having someone else do it for you department, they are out running a trench down my driveway for utilities to the new house. And have broken the water line to the existing one. I am trying very hard to stay inside and just let them deal with it, although I've warned my wife not to flush for a while.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  5. #545
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I perhaps used a confusing word: vacuum. It's actually a Jet DC-650 dust collector. But it's essentially a semi-mobile vacuum and I've used it for general shop cleanup in that capacity - I just reduce the hose size to 2" and use my shop vac hose for greater reach. It works pretty well with the barrel separator, which has a cyclone-like top fitted inside.
    Nah, I wasn't confused much. When you mentioned "Jet" and a 4" hose, I figured you were talking about a conventional dust collector. The "two-bag" did throw me a bit though. I pictured something like this. I would call the DC-650 a single-bag model because even though it has a two bags, only one of them is providing filtration, while the other collects the bulk dust.

    It turns out that you and I have similar collectors. Mine is the Shop Fox W1727...no great shakes but it was economical and local.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I have three tools with dust collection ports, none of which are the same size or fit any vacuum fitting I can find. I've located my chop saw out in the covered patio.
    I have a variety of tool ports as well. My Dewalt mitre saw takes a standard 1Ĺ-inch vac hose, as does the midsize router plunge base. I bought a Festool hose specifically for their jig saw but it also fits my Bosch sander, with encouragement. The thing about those hoses is, their flexibility has a mind of it's own. So, I've been eyeballing this hose/fitting kit from Rockler.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  6. #546
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    And I've collected more since then.
    And a few other tools too!
    Having a different selection of clamps would have been helpful at various points in this project, but I can usually make do with what I have.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    You guys have better clamps than I do. I'm suffering from clamp envy.
    I feel like my father and good friend Dan, both passed away now, had a hand in this project as some of the clamps I used were inherited from them. I get sentimental that way.

    Anyway, it's hard to believe it's been almost two weeks since the last update, but with the weather being so nice I've had other distractions. I finished assembly of the night tables today. And it required a lot of glue and clamping!

    Attaching the drawer-front to the previously assembled drawer, with cheesy methods for dealing with the curvature that made the clamps want to slide off sideways.


    Before joining the drawer assembly, cantilever, and table top. To minimize the chance of the table twisting off should someone put too much weight on it, I also used steel angle brackets inside the top back corners, and a long screw through the back and into the upper part of the side panels.


    After some touch-up sanding, several coats of Varathane should bring out the grain, as it did for the headboard.
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  7. #547
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    Couple of other things:

    I don't have a dust collection system, apart from a shop vac that can be attached or placed near certain tools. It's a hindrance in that the prospect of making dust sometimes discourages me from beginning a task. I tend to be more productive when the weather is nice and I can open the doors to blow out the place when I'm done.

    Today I used electrical contact cleaner on the power switch of a 40 year old radio so that I wouldn't have to fiddle with it to get it to stay on. Well, the contact is now solid and doesn't crackle or fade away, but it's become harder to actually move the switch between the off and on positions. I wonder if there was so much grunge inside that has now been moved into a spot that causes this new difficulty. Regardless, that radio doesn't owe me anything...

  8. #548
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    Adventures in DIY

    Looking quite nice, Torsten. Very clean lines.

    Your quote of Trebís post about clamps brought to mind another source. The Seattle area has Harbor Freight stores at several locations. Many cost-conscious members of woodworking forums I frequent use them with good results.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  9. #549
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    Looking for workbench ideas here.

    I need a workbench of 4' x 12'. Unfortunately, I don't have the space to keep it set up all the time. Last night I bought three 4'x4' wood panels that I plan to set up on sawhorses on the occasions when I need all 12 feet of working space. I have four sawhorses, so my thinking is to put one sawhorse on each end of the bench, with one or two crossways to support the middle.

    So now I need a way to hold the pieces together so that the entire workbench remains flat. I'm imagining some sort of swiveling lock underneath that can hold the panels together without breaking the top surface and get in the way. Then, when I'm done, the three panels can unlock and be stored out of the way.

  10. #550
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Looking quite nice, Torsten. Very clean lines.

    Your quote of Treb’s post about clamps brought to mind another source. The Seattle area has Harbor Freight stores at several locations. Many cost-conscious members of woodworking forums I frequent use them with good results.
    That's actually where most of my clamps come from. I've broken at least two by overtightening. And the ones they are selling now are inferior to the previous ones. One nice thing about them is that you can take an end off and put it on the other way, making it a spreader. I've used that when I needed to spread a cracked catapult member so I could squirt glue in it then clamp it back together.

    And for Torsten, I see nothing at all cheesy about using those wedges so the clamps work.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  11. #551
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesabrown View Post
    Looking for workbench ideas here.

    I need a workbench of 4' x 12'. Unfortunately, I don't have the space to keep it set up all the time. Last night I bought three 4'x4' wood panels that I plan to set up on sawhorses on the occasions when I need all 12 feet of working space. I have four sawhorses, so my thinking is to put one sawhorse on each end of the bench, with one or two crossways to support the middle.

    So now I need a way to hold the pieces together so that the entire workbench remains flat. I'm imagining some sort of swiveling lock underneath that can hold the panels together without breaking the top surface and get in the way. Then, when I'm done, the three panels can unlock and be stored out of the way.
    Another option might be to install a piece under each end of the middle one (having a hard time describing this) that is permanently screwed on, then use countersunk bolts and nuts to join the end pieces to it. I assume this is pretty heavy plywood?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  12. #552
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesabrown View Post
    Looking for workbench ideas here.

    I need a workbench of 4' x 12'. Unfortunately, I don't have the space to keep it set up all the time. Last night I bought three 4'x4' wood panels that I plan to set up on sawhorses on the occasions when I need all 12 feet of working space. I have four sawhorses, so my thinking is to put one sawhorse on each end of the bench, with one or two crossways to support the middle.

    So now I need a way to hold the pieces together so that the entire workbench remains flat. I'm imagining some sort of swiveling lock underneath that can hold the panels together without breaking the top surface and get in the way. Then, when I'm done, the three panels can unlock and be stored out of the way.
    A couple of 10' 2x4s lying across the sawhorses might provide the strength you need to prevent the panels sagging, while draw clasps attached to the lower side could provide the tension to keep them together.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    And for Torsten, I see nothing at all cheesy about using those wedges so the clamps work.
    I was thinking more about having crossed the clamps on the left side because the wedges wouldn't help in that location. I was really happy that the contraption didn't fall apart, because it was all kind of "slippery".

  13. #553
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I was thinking more about having crossed the clamps on the left side because the wedges wouldn't help in that location. I was really happy that the contraption didn't fall apart, because it was all kind of "slippery".
    Whatever gets the job done. Some of my multiple clamp setups have been far more suspect.

    Nice work on the project.

  14. #554
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    A couple of 10' 2x4s lying across the sawhorses might provide the strength you need to prevent the panels sagging, while draw clasps attached to the lower side could provide the tension to keep them together.
    That sounds like it would work very nicely. Looks like I could set up and tear down the workbench in about two minutes.

    I've never seen those draw clasps, but it's about what I had envisioned. I'll give that a shot. Thank you.

  15. #555
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    Thanks for the positive comments. That may provide the motivation to take on another project. But first I have other chores to do and a short summer to enjoy with outdoor activities.

    My project is finally done. After allowing the finish to harden a few days, I assembled it all yesterday. The headboard, completed more than a year ago, has a different colour now and the grain is more obvious.





    Yeah, that wall still needs some colour, and art.
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  16. #556
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    Very nice.

  17. #557
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    Very nice indeed. I love how the nightstands echo the curve of the headboard.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #558
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    Thanks again.

    Trebuchet, I'm glad you picked up on that because when I initially sketched it, having that arc repeat in two different planes was the feature that made it "work" for me.

  19. #559
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    I think itís about time to embark on my next project. We have the ashes of three cats whoíve left us over the years, interred in the tins provided by the vet/cremation service. The Wife and I have discussed me making some nicer looking urn boxes and over the last few days, weíve pretty much finalized the design:



    The primary wood will be some of the lovely curly maple I picked up a while back without having a particular project in mind. It wonít take much of it. Each box will have contrasting trim of a different species: padauk, purple heart, and morado (pau ferro). The ashes will be placed through the underside of the box and the bottom will be screwed in place.

    The Wife likes things very simple but I canít help sneaking in some detail. I plan to create v-chamfers in the joints where the trim meets the box and the outside edges will be rounded over. The catís paw graphic and each catís name will be ink jet printed on transparent water slide decal paper, applied under the final coats of finish.
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  20. #560
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    Lovely. Both the design and the sentiment behind it.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #561
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    Yes. I'm interested in how those sneaky details will be done.

  22. #562
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Yes. I'm interested in how those sneaky details will be done.
    Right now, the idea is to build the carcass of the box first with mitered corners. Then, Iíll cut a 1/2-inch rabbet out of the top and side edges to accept the trim pieces. Instead of simply butt gluing the trim in place with flush surfaces, Iíll mill a 1/32-inch chamfer on every edge where the trim meets the box, resulting in a 1/16-inch wide v-groove along each trim-box joint. Iíll also chamfer the outside edge of the arched bottom of the side panels. The bottoms of the vertical trim pieces will be 1/8-inch proud of the bottom of the box to serve as feet and those edges will be chamfered as well.

    And this project grew by one box this morning. The Wife spoke to a friend of hers in Homer yesterday and learned that her dog passed on Wednesday. Weíre to have dinner with her during our trip there next month and Dona asked if I could have one completed for her by then. I adjusted the dimensions in SketchUp this morning. Her dog weighed about 80 pounds, so the volume needs to be 80 cubic inches plus a little. Iíll get started on it next weekend.
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  23. #563
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    Oh, now I get it. I had pictured a wide chamfer along the edges of the box, with the trim cut at a 45 degree on the glue side, and its edges in turn chamfered to create the v. The rabbet is a stronger solution and all the pieces will be easier to align.

  24. #564
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    I just now cleared a clogged drain that was tying up the kitchen sink and the dishwasher. It defied Drano clog remover, probably because it was up to 15 feet from the sink along a nearly horizontal run of drain pipe. I tried to get it with a snake to no avail. I tried compressed air into the drain but the air just went up the vent stack. Standing water in the sink put very little pressure on the clog. I capped the drain and took a garden hose up to the stack and filled it to the top, making a high enough column, about 10 feet, to generate about 5 psi of pressure. Still not enough. Finally I went to Home Depot and found enough fittings to improvise a watertight connection between the hose and the stack, so I could turn on the water and give it about 50 psi. That blew it out. Now I am letting it run a while to wash the gunk out before it can settle down and cause more trouble. It is nice to avoid upwards of $200 to call in a plumber to clear it.

  25. #565
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    Iíve tried to keep my keister in gear so I can have this box done in plenty of time. Hereís where it stood as of yesterday afternoon, just after the trim was all glued up:



    Later, I flushed the trim at the router table...where one of the feet had a catch. No problem. I just cut them a little shorter and they look fine. I then put a round-over on the edges. I abandoned the planned chamfers because they needed another joinery method to be workable. I finished the evening with a lot of sanding.

    This morning, I spritzed on some water to raise the grain and once dry, I lightly sanded the resulting fuzz off. It now has its first base coat of shellac.
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  26. #566
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    As my wife was leaving for work yesterday, our garage door opener decided to call it quits. I opened the door for her manually and after she'd gone, I tried to determine the problem by operating the door again, resulting in a loud bang and the drive chain going slack. Problem determined: the drive gear shaft snapped. If it had to go, the timing wasn't bad because I took the day off to take our dog to the vet for minor surgery. When I dropped him off they said it would be a while due to the sedation, so I made a quick trip to the Lowe's store in Wasilla to buy a new opener. I had to buy the entire kit since the box stores don't stock the just the motors. But the price wasn't as high as I thought it might be and with the military discount, I got the required-but-not-included (LED) light bulbs for "free".

    After collecting the brown clown, I installed the opener in pretty short order. I didn't replace the whole kit since everything else appeared to be in good order...except for the indoor switch. The old one was, well, old and grungy. The rest I'll save as spare parts.

    Back to the pet urn box, here's the current state of things:



    To smooth the grain, I applied three coats of spray shellac, sanding each one back before applying the next. The photo shows a fourth coat, buffed with a fine Scotch Brite pad. I need to finalize the decal, apply it, lay down another coat or two of shellac, and finish with spray lacquer.
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  27. #567
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    In the previous photo of the urn box, it appears the edge pieces are slightly proud of the panels. How did you make them flush?

  28. #568
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    Very nice. I like the way the finish brings out the grain, and also has that look of bullet-proof durability.

    That SketchUp pattern/template for the curly maple is really good.

  29. #569
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    In the previous photo of the urn box, it appears the edge pieces are slightly proud of the panels. How did you make them flush?
    I got things within a hair of flush at the router table using a pattern routing bit. A #4 smoothing plane did the rest.

    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Very nice. I like the way the finish brings out the grain, and also has that look of bullet-proof durability.

    That SketchUp pattern/template for the curly maple is really good.
    Thanks. Thatís a custom texture I created from a photo found via Google and tweaked in Photoshop. Iíve made a handful so far. The stock wood textures in SketchUp leave a lot to be desired.

    I finalized the decals this morning: one for the front of the box and one for the bottom...





    And hereís closeup of the mitered trim...



    This is with a couple more coats of shellac down. One or two more, sanded back, and Iíll spray on one or two coats of lacquer.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2018-Jun-09 at 10:54 PM.
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  30. #570
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    Really nice work. And it touched me a bit - I had a great furfriend named Spike. I miss her.

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