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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #751
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    I glued up the urn box for my motherís ailing dog today and it was my first time using liquid hide glue. Interesting. It has the color, consistency, and stickiness of warm caramel. I much appreciated the long open time, so I wasnít in such a rush to apply and assemble.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  2. #752
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    The SawStop is assembled (passed Chuck's grueling inspection), except for the outfeed table. I'll do that later.

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    I've installed a blade, set it up, checked alignment of everything (including the brake) and turned it on. Thankfully, it didn't pop the breaker (it's on a dedicated 20A feed so it shouldn't have but you never know).

    To install the extension wings (which like the main table are cast iron and heavy), I used Brett's suggestion, sort of. I don't have parallel clamps.

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    Overall, I'm impressed with the SawStop hardware. It's quality, substantial stuff. And I am super impressed with the assembly instructions and hardware packaging. I did have a few issues, though. One bolt for the integral mobile base was balky and required cleanup with a thread file. The left extension wing just would not stay exactly aligned when I tightened the bolts not matter what I did in the way of clamping and sequential tightening, so it is slightly proud of the main table. Shouldn't be an issue. The zero clearance insert, which is a good one, was cut through slightly at an off angle so I had to recut it by raising the blade through it. I had already verified the blade was parallel to the fence and miter slots. Also not an issue but I would have expected that to be perfect out of the box.

    It will take several weeks to get rid of all the packaging trash unless I take it to the dump/recycling center myself. Chuck (the black cat above) seems to like the big box the saw came in.

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  3. #753
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    Very nice.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  4. #754
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    Looking good!

    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    To install the extension wings (which like the main table are cast iron and heavy), I used Brett's suggestion, sort of. I don't have parallel clamps.
    Wellllll...I did say that you could use a screw clamp, which is essential what you made, so I think I’ll retain full credit for my brilliance and I’m sure my royalty check is in the mail. <smirk> But seriously, that was a nice solution.

    The left extension wing just would not stay exactly aligned when I tightened the bolts not matter what I did in the way of clamping and sequential tightening, so it is slightly proud of the main table. Shouldn't be an issue.
    I had similar issues but I kept at it until they were flush. Similar to yours, one was just proud in the middle when the ends were flush. I incrementally tightened the middle bolts while I persuaded it with a dead blow mallet, then employed a parallel clamp with jaws reversed to act as a jack to bring the ends into alignment. It took a good while.

    I think you’ll find the pre-cut insert is the universal variety. The ZCIs come in two flavors: blank, save for a riving knife slot for use with standard blades; and completely blank for use with a dado stack. I initially bought extras of the standard ZCI for use with my usual rip and crosscut blades but now I’m using the Colliflower ZCI full time. It uses replaceable melamine/MDF inserts. It costs more up front but the inserts significantly lower the cost of setting up for multiple blade/dado stack widths in the long run. I also intend to take a stab at making my own inserts.

    Does the PCS base give you enough agility in your space? I would have liked that less expensive option but it wouldn’t allow me to pull the saw straight out from the front, then push it sideways 90-ish degrees as I do in my current shop setup.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2019-Jan-28 at 09:13 PM. Reason: fixed link
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  5. #755
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    I spent some time in the shop today milling some redheart for the current urn box project. I cut a piece down to size and rather than set up the jointer, I decided to joint one face by hand before running it through the planer. Since I donít have a standard bed jack plane, I got out the trusty #6 and got it done in pretty good time. Quite satisfying. After planing it to thickness, I hand jointed one edge and took it to the table saw to rip it to width.

    This is when I had a DOH! moment.

    I looked at my fence scale cross eyed and instead of ripping it to 3-1/2 inches strong, I made it a little over 3-3/8Ē wide. Fortunately, the blade left a glue-ready edge so I glued it up and threw on some Kreg face clamps to keep the edges aligned. I just took it out of the clamps and scraped one side to check the joint. It looks nigh on invisible so I wonít have to mill a new piece tomorrow.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  6. #756
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Wellllll...I did say that you could use a screw clamp, which is essential what you made, so I think Iíll retain full credit for my brilliance and Iím sure my royalty check is in the mail. <smirk> But seriously, that was a nice solution.
    The check is in the mail. Yes, I should have said your more elegant solution rather than two clunky 2x4 scraps. Reminds me that I need to buy some parallel clamps.


    I had similar issues but I kept at it until they were flush. Similar to yours, one was just proud in the middle when the ends were flush. I incrementally tightened the middle bolts while I persuaded it with a dead blow mallet, then employed a parallel clamp with jaws reversed to act as a jack to bring the ends into alignment. It took a good while.
    I spent a lot of time banging away with a mallet, too. It really isn't off by much, so it will do.

    I think youíll find the pre-cut insert is the universal variety. The ZCIs come in two flavors: blank, save for a riving knife slot for use with standard blades; and completely blank for use with a dado stack. I initially bought extras of the standard ZCI for use with my usual rip and crosscut blades but now Iím using the http://www.colliflower-zci.com/all-products/sawstop]Colliflower ZCI[/url] full time. It uses replaceable melamine/MDF inserts. It costs more up front but the inserts significantly lower the cost of setting up for multiple blade/dado stack widths in the long run. I also intend to take a stab at making my own inserts.
    Yes, I've used blank ZCIs with my previous saw. I just thought that because this one was pre-cut, it should have been pre-cut parallel to the blade. I did buy a blank ZCI for dado stacks. BTW, I love the SawStop inserts because they positively latch into the opening. Better than the ones on my Jet saw that just sat freely in the opening and required awkward clamping when you initially made the cut.

    Does the PCS base give you enough agility in your space? I would have liked that less expensive option but it wouldnít allow me to pull the saw straight out from the front, then push it sideways 90-ish degrees as I do in my current shop setup.
    It works just fine for my setup. The saw sits in an acceptably spacious area of my shop (barely) as long as I don't need the outfeed table. If I do, I will roll the saw to the left into the open area where one of our cars normally resides. The left-side wheels are not casters, so you can't pull it straight out towards you. You made the right choice for your situation.

  7. #757
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Yes, I should have said your more elegant solution rather than two clunky 2x4 scraps. Reminds me that I need to buy some parallel clamps.
    Clunky? Nah. Expedient, economical, and it achieved equal results, Iíd say.

    I just thought that because this one was pre-cut, it should have been pre-cut parallel to the blade.
    Yep, Iíd expect that, too. You might give Ďem a call to report that. I wouldnít be at all surprised if they send you a new one.

    In the shop today: as Iíd hoped, the glue up went well. I got the lid mostly done. Iím just waiting on the glued filler strip to cure overnight. Iíll finish construction tomorrow.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  8. #758
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    The insert for my Ryobi chop saw came with no slot whatsoever. You were just supposed to put it in, install the blade, and cut it. Perfect fit.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  9. #759
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    The insert for my Ryobi chop saw came with no slot whatsoever. You were just supposed to put it in, install the blade, and cut it. Perfect fit.
    Yes, those are the 'blanks' previously mentioned. I've used them and they work great. The SawStop comes with an insert pre-cut.

  10. #760
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    Now that you have the saw assembled, what will the inaugural project be?

    Earlier this week, I wrapped up the urn box for my motherís ailing pooch:



    I have only one more that I need to make but I may just have to make a batch of Ďem and see if thereís any interest on Etsy. However, I donít think Iíll offer any with redheart lids like this one. Similar to padauk, the sanding dust tends to stain the maple.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  11. #761
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Yes, I should have said your more elegant solution rather than two clunky 2x4 scraps. Reminds me that I need to buy some parallel clamps.
    Hmmm, I recall getting some really good encouragement here along the lines of "Whatever gets the job done".

    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Earlier this week, I wrapped up the urn box for my motherís ailing pooch
    One of the things I really like about that design with the additional "bar" is that it makes the lid look like it's physically locked in place.

    I finally had a chance to look for a fine saw in a hobby store, and bought a Revell Razor Saw Set. I measured the kerf at 0.012 inch, or 0.3 mm. It's perfect for cutting those control surface lines onto my model.

    But progress is slow. The multiple curves where the cowling and windshield meet, as well as the shape of the lower side of the cowling are taking time to grind down.

  12. #762
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    The check is in the mail. Yes, I should have said your more elegant solution rather than two clunky 2x4 scraps...
    Which reminds me, I need to get the guy putting the fourth wall on our old garage to toss a bunch of those cut-offs inside when he's done. We've got some elevated space where we're going to display stuff but some of it will need just a bit of extra elevation.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #763
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    This thread makes me want to start a building hobby.

  14. #764
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    One of the things I really like about that design with the additional "bar" is that it makes the lid look like it's physically locked in place.
    I wish that had been my clever intent in the design but really, I did it for symmetry: both visually and construction-wise.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  15. #765
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    With one of my hobby cars gone (sniff) I'm cleaning up the garage. During the years of DIY'ing at the house, materials just got laid there on top of each other. Now I sort things out and I'll place the construction wood in the basement. Yes, we have a very dry basement.

    Upon seeing the ridiculous amount of wood beams (something like 2"x2" I think) I still have, I'm thinking about building a garden shed myself instead of buying one. Basically, I'd only need the thicker corner poles and I can use the wood I have for the wall construction.

    And now I'm off to carry all that wood into the basement. Good exercise.

  16. #766
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    Adventures in DIY

    Today, I finished a quick (for me) and simple project: a picture frame.



    The Wife and I bought these prints from a local artist during our day trip to Talkeetna last summer. I had the mat and glass cut to my specifications then made the frame to fit. The primary wood is sapele, with maple miter splines. The finish was boiled linseed oil, Sealcoat, and satin spray lacquer.

    Unfortunately, the lighting doesnít do the sapele justice. The grain shimmers when your viewing angle changes, with light bands turning darker and vice versa.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  17. #767
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    Sapele is a beautiful wood. Nice frame.

  18. #768
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    That's really something to crow about!


    Sorry.



    No, I'm not.


    ETA: Oh, wait. Perhaps you should be raven about it.
    Last edited by Trebuchet; 2019-Feb-04 at 03:59 PM.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #769
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    It's people like you that make this thread a birden.

  20. #770
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    That's really something to crow about!

    Sorry.

    No, I'm not.

    ETA: Oh, wait. Perhaps you should be raven about it.
    I had similar punny thoughts. I like corvids and I like those prints.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  21. #771
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    My new Sawstop table saw is ready for action. I installed the outfeed table and built a sled using William Ng's 5-cut method, although I did not achieve quite the accuracy he did. Four thousands off over a 24 inch cut (he got on thousandth in his video). One of the large attachment screws for the front fence started to split the plywood despite my using the proper taper bit. Cheap plywood, I guess. I popped four screws into the fence to encourage it to maintain structural integrity. The runners are also a little tight but that's better than loose.

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  22. #772
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    It wants at least one of your fingers to do right of course--as a sacrifice.
    --signed, stumpy

  23. #773
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    My new Sawstop table saw is ready for action.
    Looking good. Are you going to install a blade guard on the exit kerf?

    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    It wants at least one of your fingers to do right of course--as a sacrifice.
    --signed, stumpy
    Not true. SawStop wants love, not fear so it promises not to take a finger.
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  24. #774
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    A productive morning in the shop: I got started on another picture frame. This one is similar in design to the last but smaller, in cherry, and with an inlay of walnut...or if that doesnít work out, a colored epoxy. Itís glued up and in clamps as I write this.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  25. #775
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Looking good. Are you going to install a blade guard on the exit kerf?
    Yes. But I'm not going to install the plexi shield between the fences.

  26. #776
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    A productive morning in the shop: I got started on another picture frame. This one is similar in design to the last but smaller, in cherry, and with an inlay of walnut...or if that doesn’t work out, a colored epoxy. It’s glued up and in clamps as I write this.
    You probably have mentioned it upthread somewhere, but what jig do you use for frames? I assume it's mounted on your sled?

  27. #777
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    You probably have mentioned it upthread somewhere, but what jig do you use for frames? I assume it's mounted on your sled?
    I did mention it pretty far upthread during Krogerís urn build. Itís a stand-alone jig I slapped together:

    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Before starting on the top of the urn, I needed to make a small miter sled. Nothing fancy, since Iím not set on the design.

    Iíve thought about incorporating an miter fixture to my next sled but Iím not yet decided.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  28. #778
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    Adventures in DIY

    I started a new picture frame this weekend. This one is similar to the last but smaller, in cherry, with walnut inlay and miter splines. I milled the pieces on Saturday and glued them up.

    I started today off by making a thickness planing jig to make the inlay strips. I donít trust my surface planer with really thin, narrow strips because sometimes lifts the leading edge, causing them to pretty much explode. Iím not sure itís original with him but I got the idea from Rob Cosman. Painters tape fine tuned the thickness.



    I ripped the strips to rough thickness on the table saw and planed them down using a low angle block plane. I then fit them to the grooves using another quick and dirty jig. I donít remember the name for it but itís based on a jig I saw in an older magazine or book. It allowed me to tweak the fit of the tiny miters for a tight fit. The square end also worked as a guide for trimming them to rough length with a small pull saw.




    After the glue set up a bit, I cut the corner spline slots using the jig I made for the previous frame. Since these werenít to be cut as deeply as on the larger frame, I applied some vinyl tape to control tear out on the back side of the cut.




    I used my surface planer to mill the corner splines since theyíre from wider stock. I did so using an auxiliary bed made from waxed MDF, so I wasnít working near the planerís depth limit. The spline stock was then cut to rough size and glued in the slots.



    After the glue had cured enough for moderate working, I flushed up the splines and inlay.



    Now itís down to sanding, the rabbet, and finish.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2019-Feb-11 at 06:15 AM.
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  29. #779
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    I'm starting a project building some bookshelves which will require a handful of half-and-half joints. I've looked on Google and the only explanations how to do that I can find are either way more complicated than I'll need, or else assume I'll be using a table saw, which I don't have.

    Any suggestions?

  30. #780
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesabrown View Post
    I'm starting a project building some bookshelves which will require a handful of half-and-half joints. I've looked on Google and the only explanations how to do that I can find are either way more complicated than I'll need, or else assume I'll be using a table saw, which I don't have.

    Any suggestions?
    What equipment do you have? Maybe a radial arm saw?

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