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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #841
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    Forstners make nice clean holes but for this application, I’d pick a good brad point bit for greater depth and better chip clearing.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  2. #842
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    How many of these chairs are you making?

    ETA: And can you drill holes into which a dowel will fit snugly?
    Just one for now, but if I like how it turns out, I might make another.

    And are you suggesting using dowels in place of screws? Would that make the board shifting less likely?

  3. #843
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    I'd probably do dowels AND screws. Belt and suspenders, and keep one hand on the waistband for extra security!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #844
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesabrown View Post
    Just one for now, but if I like how it turns out, I might make another.

    And are you suggesting using dowels in place of screws? Would that make the board shifting less likely?
    Yep, I'm thinking of dowels (instead of screws) for adding strength to the joint, by providing some long grain gluing surface. With standard miters, all you have is end grain gluing surface, which isn't as strong as a long grain glue joint. But you'll need to have the pieces accurately aligned and fixed before drilling the dowel holes.

    I asked about the number of chairs being made because I thought it might be worthwhile to build an assembly jig...a piece of plywood onto which blocks/rails are affixed that align your workpieces and provide secure clamping points. They're handy for making multiple copies with monotonous regularity.

    Whether you're using screws or dowels, there are a few ways to clamp the joints for gluing, screwing, drilling, etc. There are purpose-made angle clamps but they may not be the best option for larger workpieces and they're kind of a one-trick pony. I have a couple that rarely get used.

    A common method is to glue 45°-angled clamping blocks near the ends of your miters. These will provide parallel surfaces for clamps to apply pressure across the joint. Afterward, they're cut off and surface is planed/sanded smooth.

    I often use clamping squares (plastic versions available) for larger frame members, like you're making. In a pinch and/or for a local option, you could use hardware store corner braces (or this one) as a substitute.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  5. #845
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    Thank you for the advice. I'll keep you posted.

  6. #846
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    I've been busy again with placing the interior doors. Good news: all holes in the brick walls are of acceptable size. I've now ran out of wood pieces to mount everything square, so I'll have to saw up various thicknesses of scrap wood to continue. And I'll need to do some plaster work to refinish some pieces that broke off when I removed the old doors.

    Meanwhile I'm looking into ways of getting the old paint off of my Alpine. It's a polyester car, so chemical stripping basically is a no-go. I'm going to try razor blades and hope it flies off as I've seen happen on Corvettes. Likely not though, so last resort is sandsandsandsand. How to make a small car big? Sand it.

  7. #847
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    I spent of bit of my Saturday afternoon cooking up an old-fashioned wood finish recipe:



    Equal parts beeswax, boiled linseed oil, and turpentine.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  8. #848
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    So will we be seeing a fumed oak magazine box with this old fashioned finish?

  9. #849
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    So will we be seeing a fumed oak magazine box with this old fashioned finish?
    Yep, that's the plan. This project is going to have a couple of narrow nooks and crannies that'll make finishing after assembly a pain, so I'll apply some of the finish before glue-up. However, I do not want to fume before assembly...an even bigger pain...so I need a finish that doesn't prevent or hinder the fuming process. One online source described both his finish recipe and the results he achieved by applying it prior to fuming the piece. Just what I was looking for.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2019-Apr-24 at 08:57 PM. Reason: "...some of the..."
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  10. #850
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    Wow. What a difference in the effect when the finish is applied before fuming.

  11. #851
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    Adventures in DIY

    Productive and frustrating shop time this weekend. I milled the box sides to final dimensions on Saturday and in the process, I ripped them a 1/2-inch too narrow. Looked at the ruler cross-eyed. That’s not a big deal as far as end use goes but it did complicate cutting the finger joints. I had to shim the dado stack to a width that would yield an odd number (21) of fingers/notches in the given width. I came close and will have an addition smidgen to rip off the bottom.



    Dry fit:



    The second box is not shown because...more frustration. While jointing the final edge, the adjustment lock knob on the finger joint jig loosened, resulting in that one edge not fitting. Not even close. I’ll have to come up with a plan to recover the piece or cut a new one from the spare panel glue up.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2019-Apr-29 at 07:25 AM.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  12. #852
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    Well, when this is a bad that for you, just remember that I'm already happy when I can make a square cut for once.

  13. #853
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    It appears I just made a good deal on a dust collector; I'll pick it up on Sunday (if the seller doesn't act weird in the coming days). Any low-cost ideas on how to accomodate different suction tube diameters?

  14. #854
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    It appears I just made a good deal on a dust collector; I'll pick it up on Sunday (if the seller doesn't act weird in the coming days). Any low-cost ideas on how to accomodate different suction tube diameters?
    aerosol foam, wet the surfaces to make it set faster.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  15. #855
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    It appears I just made a good deal on a dust collector; I'll pick it up on Sunday (if the seller doesn't act weird in the coming days). Any low-cost ideas on how to accomodate different suction tube diameters?
    What diameters are we talking about, that is, what is the DC equipped for and what reduction do you want?
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  16. #856
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    I have no concrete numbers at the moment as I don't own the DC yet. I just know that I'll want to use the DC with the miter saw, table saw, both of which have a different hose attachment diameter, likely different from the one on the DC as well. I'll also want a to be able to attach a wider "mouth" for when I use the jigsaw or wood lathe. In other words: I'd need different reductions which are detachable, so no glue.

  17. #857
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I have no concrete numbers at the moment as I don't own the DC yet. I just know that I'll want to use the DC with the miter saw, table saw, both of which have a different hose attachment diameter, likely different from the one on the DC as well. I'll also want a to be able to attach a wider "mouth" for when I use the jigsaw or wood lathe. In other words: I'd need different reductions which are detachable, so no glue.
    Much will depend on what model you’re getting but the most common fitting diameter of a typical hobbyist level DC is 4 inches with larger models being 5 or 6 inches. These units rely on moving a lot of air quickly (ft³/min or CFM) as opposed to suction (static pressure). Miter saw dust fittings are in the range of 1-½ to 2-½ inches, designed to work with shop vacs, since they’re portable jobsite tools. Woodworking DC performance suffers with such constriction. Static pressure rises as the inlet area is reduced but CFM falls off quite sharply, so you’ll probably be better off with a vac for that tool.

    Check Amazon for DC adapter fittings. Powetec is a common brand that’s not unreasonably priced.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  18. #858
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    I haven't really done any DIY for a while and yesterday it showed. I had to put up a new Roller Blind and because of the location it had to be secured to the ceiling. So I went off and bought some toggle bolts.

    Put the 4 of them in an then tried to fit the blind. A bit of twisting caused one of the bolts to come out. And yes, I had screwed the bolt through the 'wings' the wrong way around. Turned them around and everything was fine except for my pride.

  19. #859
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Much will depend on what model you’re getting but the most common fitting diameter of a typical hobbyist level DC is 4 inches with larger models being 5 or 6 inches. These units rely on moving a lot of air quickly (ft³/min or CFM) as opposed to suction (static pressure). Miter saw dust fittings are in the range of 1-½ to 2-½ inches, designed to work with shop vacs, since they’re portable jobsite tools. Woodworking DC performance suffers with such constriction. Static pressure rises as the inlet area is reduced but CFM falls off quite sharply, so you’ll probably be better off with a vac for that tool.

    Check Amazon for DC adapter fittings. Powetec is a common brand that’s not unreasonably priced.
    Thanks. My miter saw has a dust bag on it that does exactly zero. So I'm thinking of making a general purpose DC funnel that I can place behind the miter saw or lathe when I need it. The table saw has a pretty decent dust capturing device that I'll likely be able to connect to the hose directly.

    Anyway, if I take a little bit care in the way I set things up, it will soon be much better than your granny's second hand home vac cleaner. This is hobby grade, but it is a big old two bag DC system with good airflow. And for a few tenners I couldn't resist.

  20. #860
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    Rockler has a ton of dust collection fittings and adapters. That's where I'd go once you decide what you need.

  21. #861
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    Sigh, sale cancelled by the seller. Seriously, buying second hand is such a drama in this country; people either have no ethics or don't know what they really want when selling or buying stuff.

  22. #862
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Rockler has a ton of dust collection fittings and adapters. That's where I'd go once you decide what you need.
    If one has a local store, Rockler and Woodcraft are good options for DC fittings. The nearest to me are in Seattle and I make a point of shopping them whenever I'm there. Rockler stinks where shipping rates are concerned. For instance, I've had my eye on a floor sweep kit for my DC. Their free and 'economy' shipping rates are not available for Alaska, Hawaii, nor international address, I imagine. Shipping rates offered for that item range from US$36.30 (4-6 days) to $152.66 (next day). For even a single reducer fitting, the lowest rate is almost double the item cost. Woodcraft is much more reasonable in this regard but unfortunately, the sweep kit is a Rockler product. Ah well, we'll be in the neighborhood in October.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Sigh, sale cancelled by the seller. Seriously, buying second hand is such a drama in this country; people either have no ethics or don't know what they really want when selling or buying stuff.
    I can relate. I had one seller flake out on me a couple of years ago. I told him I'd take the item and that I'd be right over. He sold it out from under me during the 30-minute drive from my house to his. No courtesy call. No apology. No clue.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  23. #863
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    Flakes abound. I've experienced them both as seller and buyer.

    I bought my dust collector through Amazon. They had the adapters and hose too. I was quite happy with the transaction.

    And I can't say enough good things about owning a dust collector. That airplane model has required a lot of sanding. I've done it using both a bench sander and by hand, and simply having the DC hose nearby when I'm hand sanding creates enough airflow to keep the work clean.

  24. #864
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    I was attempting to buy a metal miter saw as well, same story. I respond after half an hour that I want it. Doesn't answer for a whole week, then tell's me it's "already" sold.

  25. #865
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    I've finished installing the interior doors and cutting the baseboard of the complex shape hallway. I still have to glue the baseboard, but that's minor. After that, it's only applying painter kit in door and baseboard seams, and of course painting. But even in its current state it's already a big upgrade from the cheap finish it was before. Now it's a free interpretation of Long Island style.

    That miter saw has already paid back for itself 10 times after all the baseboards and 13 interior doors.

  26. #866
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I've finished installing the interior doors and cutting the baseboard of the complex shape hallway.
    Something must be wrong with the forum. Surely, you posted pictures but I don’t see them.

    Got out into the shop today to fix my mistake from last weekend. The culprit turned out to be a short side (or end) piece. Bonus, I didn’t have to mess with duplicating a sliding dovetail slot—just a groove for the bottom panel and a stopped dado for a divider...and the finger joints of course. After some fussing with trial cuts, I got it all done and I now have the carcasses for two boxes. I’m back on track.

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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  27. #867
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    I'm not a picture poster. I have no digital camera nor a smartphone, and my flatbed scanner gives questionable results with hallways.

  28. #868
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    I've managed to score a used abrasive cut-off saw for 10% of its shop price. It's a Makita, those just won't die. Will come in very useful when I have to cut off metal bars, especially at 45°. You can of course do it with a handheld grinder as well, but this is easier. Now I'll just have to find a place to use it. Outside is good but loud for the neighbours. In the shop I can choose: bombard the car, or the other tools. I don't like either proposal. So I'll likely end up outside and smile&wave at any angry looking neighbour.

  29. #869
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    When you make a router table, you ideally want to use a router with a fixed base. However, those are less common here than the push-down base type. However, I was lucky as the push-down router given to me has all the features to make it easily useable in a router table too, with a fine depth adjustment that can be used while the vertical rails are clamped fixed. So that means I'll have to make myself a router table at one time or another. I liked the idea of a fence that hinges at one side and is clamped on the other side, something I saw on YouTube. It allows you to set the offset rapidly and doesn't require any guide rails. The only disadvantage I see is that it's a bit less easy to measure the offset you're setting.

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