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Thread: Did You Get the Name-Change Memo?

  1. #31
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    Interesting, Nauthiz. I´m aware of the US people´s opinion about this issue. I´d say that, if there is a divide between South/North Americas, that divide is the isthmus of Panama, and not the Rio Grande. To make it a continental border is, if you allow me, somewhat stupid. There´s only a cultural divide, since prior to the Panama Canal you could walk from Patagonia to Alaska. Continents are physical entities, not cultural.

    Dividing Europe and Asia also looks like a silly cultural thing.

    To keep things simple we could have only five continents: Africa, America, Antarctica, Eurasia and Oceania.
    Last edited by Argos; 2009-Jan-26 at 06:08 PM. Reason: Clarity

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    Is there any word in English that starts with a c followed by e or i where the c sounds like a k? No! Case closed. I'm sticking with selltick.....
    Fully with you there, Cougar!

    Some times, BBC, pronunciation-wise, alarms me. Exasperates.
    Posers everywhere.

    I heard Tycho Brahe (tie-co...mine) pronounced tee-co..! (Jeremy Paxton) Why?

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParaDoctor View Post
    Restroom? What has become of toilet room or washroom? "Restroom" sounds like something you find at the undertaker's.
    I've never heard "toilet room."

    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    Is there any word in English that starts with a c followed by e or i where the c sounds like a k? No! Case closed. I'm sticking with selltick.
    Yes. Celtic. You may not like it, but that's not actually an excuse to mispronounce it.
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Argos View Post
    Interesting, Nauthiz. I´m aware of the US people´s opinion about this issue. I´d say that, if there is a divide between South/North Americas, that divide is the isthmus of Panama, and not the Rio Grande. To make it a continental border is, if you allow me, somewhat stupid. There´s only a cultural divide, since prior to the Panama Canal you could walk from Patagonia to Alaska. Continents are physical entities, not cultural.

    Dividing Europe and Asia also looks like a silly cultural thing.

    To keep things simple we could have only five continents: Africa, America, Antarctica, Eurasia and Oceania.
    Yeah, I think it makes much more sense to do the division based on physical geography rather than cultural considerations. I'm no expert on such matters, but I'm pretty sure that Canada, the United States, the British Isles, Australia, and New Zealand are not all part of the same continent.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    Is there any word in English that starts with a c followed by e or i where the c sounds like a k? No! Case closed. I'm sticking with selltick.
    Are there any consistent phonetic rules in English? No!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParaDoctor View Post
    As a panagnostic, I see it more as sand being blown over the trail behind us.
    I see it more as someone's way of dealing with their discomfort of a dating system being tied to the predominant religion of Western Civilization. Thus, instead of dealing with their discomfort, they felt they had to reinvent time.

    A bit off-cilter, if you ask me...

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by nauthiz View Post
    Are there any consistent phonetic rules in English? No!
    No because the english language is a mis-mash of a number languages from Celtic, Latin, German, Norman French. Then if you include North American english which has words from Spainish, Native American, French and many others no wonder sometimes people mispronounce some words.
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  8. #38
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    There is one rule that is consistent.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahesh View Post
    Fully with you there, Cougar!

    Some times, BBC, pronunciation-wise, alarms me. Exasperates.
    Posers everywhere.

    I heard Tycho Brahe (tie-co...mine) pronounced tee-co..! (Jeremy Paxton) Why?
    Because as far as I know, "tee-co" is far closer to how it should be pronounced than "tie-co". I'm not sure about the hard "c". I pronounce it with a "ch". Which is a sound that doesn't exist in a lot of languages.

  10. 2009-Jan-26, 09:26 PM

  11. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by mugaliens View Post
    I see it more as someone's way of dealing with their discomfort of a dating system being tied to the predominant religion of Western Civilization. Thus, instead of dealing with their discomfort, they felt they had to reinvent time.
    Seems a popular move, seeing as the Gregorian calendar was used to avoid discomfort with the Julian calendar, the Julian calendar with the Roman calendar, and the Roman calendar probably with any number of Greek lunar calendars. Why should you "deal with discomfort", when a simple shift in position makes it disappear? Of course, a teensy bit of flexibility is required ...

    About the "predominant" bit: Christianity is definitely the biggest show in town globally, but among the wealthy nations, the USA are a bit of an anomaly.

  12. #41
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    Yeah, I find it funny when people don't even know how to pronounce their last names. I know one guy who pronounces his last name like the name of a prince, although the spelling is wildly different.

    Quite a stretch.

  13. #42
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    To me, they're always going to be Incas, not Inkas. The "k" just looks wrong there.

  14. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by mugaliens View Post
    Yeah, I find it funny when people don't even know how to pronounce their last names. I know one guy who pronounces his last name like the name of a prince, although the spelling is wildly different.

    Quite a stretch.
    Kind of like Mrs. Bucket insisting her name is pronounced "Boo-KAY", eh?

  15. #44
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    Within the last few months, it's come to my attention that Brits think "skeptic" is spelled with a C instead of a K, even though that's obviously impossible. Every time I see what they do to that poor word, in my mind's reader-voice, it sounds like a reference to gross/infectious microorganisms.

  16. #45
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    Ditto. When I read that spelling, it makes me think of septic systems.

  17. #46
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    The name "Celtics" for a basketball team did not originate with the present Boston organization, with which there is no connection. They began as the New York Celtics, after WW2 became the Original Celtics and had a couple of city changes over time. They were primarily a barnstorming team, although they did, from time to time, join a league. They were so much better than any other team that it seldom worked out.
    Go here for more information. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Original_Celtics

  18. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tesarra View Post
    If we're going by the argument that you can walk from A to B without getting wet (provided you have an umbrella), then Africa must also be lumped in with Europe and Asia as a single continent making the correct total 4 continents plus sundry islands.
    Africa is markedly different than Eurasia.

    Now, are Southern Texas, New mexico, Arizona, that different than Northern Mexico, so you could comfortably put them in two different continents?

    Not to mention that Kansas, Nebraska, are almost identical to the Pampas in central Argentina. Utah is a replica of northern Patagonia. Florida is very like Rio de Janeiro State. With photographs you could convince people that the Neuquen region in southwestern Argentina is British Columbia, and Punta Arenas, Chile, is an Alaskan city.

    Do you find any similarity between a given African region and Eurasia?

    Well I concede that the line of cleavage in the Americas is the equatorial zone. Still, the complex Andes/Rocky mountains is pretty continuous.
    Last edited by Argos; 2009-Jan-27 at 01:56 PM. Reason: Grammar

  19. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    Is there any word in English that starts with a c followed by e or i where the c sounds like a k?
    Sure.

    cease
    cedar
    ceiling
    celery
    celebrity
    cement
    cider
    cigar
    cichlid
    cinnamon
    cinema
    cinder

    How do you pronounce these words?

  20. #49
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    Regarding "Asian" vs. "Oriental": My Asian friends (who are from Japan, Taiwan and China) all say that "Oriental" is very Eurocentric, as Oriental means "Eastern" - eastern from where? Europe! Of course, they all would prefer being called either "Japanese" or "Taiwanese" or "Chinese", particularly given the cultural nagging between Japan and China going back centuries. I won't even get into Taiwan v. China. They all agreed that in some instances "East Asian" works, but one friend is from western China, and so that doesn't really apply either.

    In any case, they all found "Oriental" slightly offensive, but not terribly so.

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  21. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Legend View Post
    Sure.

    cease
    cedar
    ceiling
    celery
    celebrity
    cement
    cider
    cigar
    cichlid
    cinnamon
    cinema
    cinder

    How do you pronounce these words?
    umm ... the "c" is pronounced like an "s" in all of those. That was Cougar's point.

  22. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Actually, while mid laugh, it occurred to me that a lot of U.S. Citizens probably fail to realize that Mexico and Canada are part of North America.
    Conversely, I just had a conversation with an otherwise well educated American who, when told he'd been in South America (he was in Costa Rica) said "no, I'm pretty sure that is in Central America". I guess there is eight continents in his book.

  23. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by pghnative View Post
    Conversely, I just had a conversation with an otherwise well educated American who, when told he'd been in South America (he was in Costa Rica) said "no, I'm pretty sure that is in Central America". I guess there is eight continents in his book.
    OK. Costa Rica is in south America, I am black, lazy, and live my life singing La Cucaracha.

    Isn´t that the US meme?

    The CIA fact book entry fo Costa Rica:

    Location: Central America, bordering both the Caribbean Sea and the North Pacific Ocean, between Nicaragua and Panama

  24. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by pghnative View Post
    Conversely, I just had a conversation with an otherwise well educated American who, when told he'd been in South America (he was in Costa Rica) said "no, I'm pretty sure that is in Central America". I guess there is eight continents in his book.
    I guess I don't understand your point. If you consider continents as the only way to distinguish between regions, that might be the case, although I don't know what 'continent' Costa Rica is part of, if any. But the western hemisphere is commonly divided into three geographic regions: North, Central and South.

  25. #54
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    umm ... the "c" is pronounced like an "s" in all of those. That was Cougar's point.
    How about Ceilidh? (Scottish or Irish party)
    And of course there's Cello ("Chello")

  26. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Yes. Celtic. You may not like it, but that's not actually an excuse to mispronounce it.
    Well, it's not just because I don't like it. It's because it breaks the rule. Is there any other English word that breaks this rule?

    And just so you know, you're talking to someone who came from a small town in Southern California that had a street named "Milan Ave." that everyone pronounced "MY-lun."
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

  27. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sp1ke View Post
    And of course there's Cello ("Chello")
    Good, good. But still not the "k" sound....
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

  28. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    And just so you know, you're talking to someone who came from a small town in Southern California that had a street named "Milan Ave." that everyone pronounced "MY-lun."
    Funny; I have an uncle named Milan, and that's how the family pronounces it...except for my grandmother (who in my opinion is right, but it's hard to change things now)

  29. #58
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    How about 'Houston'? It seems there are two variants: Hous-ton and Hues-ton. Where did the latter come from?

  30. #59
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    How about Router? I'm always confused about that one. Cisco pronounces it rowt-er. But it's doing things to Routes... not rowtes...


  31. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I don't know what 'continent' Costa Rica is part of, if any.
    Central America sits on its own tectonic plate. By this measure, i. e. a continent is a major landmass on a single tectonic plate, we have nine continents:

    • Eurasia
    • North America
    • Antarctica
    • South America
    • Central America
    • Australia
    • Africa
    • Arabia
    • India

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