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Thread: Did You Get the Name-Change Memo?

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by jokergirl View Post
    How about Router? I'm always confused about that one. Cisco pronounces it rowt-er. But it's doing things to Routes... not rowtes...

    'Routes' is also pronounced 'rowts' by some, 'roots' by others.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParaDoctor View Post
    Central America sits on its own tectonic plate.
    That was my point.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParaDoctor View Post
    Central America sits on its own tectonic plate. By this measure, i. e. a continent is a major landmass on a single tectonic plate, we have nine continents:
    Might help balance Risk a bit if we did. Players who start in North or South America might actually manage to complete their continents once in a while, and Eurasia (for a whopping 10 armies per turn) would be harder for the Australian player to complete if he/she has to compete with India and Middle East getting similar small continental bonuses.
    "Words that make questions may not be questions at all."
    - Neil deGrasse Tyson, answering loaded question in ten words or less
    at a 2010 talk MCed by Stephen Colbert.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Ferro View Post
    Regarding "Asian" vs. "Oriental": My Asian friends (who are from Japan, Taiwan and China) all say that "Oriental" is very Eurocentric, as Oriental means "Eastern" - eastern from where? Europe! Of course, ...
    The converse is also true, in that Europe is called "the west" rather than "the center" so I don't think that criticism hold up.

    Nick

  5. #65
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    Per the online etymology dictionary--

    Asia
    from L., from Gk. Asia, speculated to be from Akkad. asu "to go out, to rise," in reference to the sun, thus "the land of the sunrise."
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  6. #66
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    How about 'Houston'? It seems there are two variants: Hous-ton and Hues-ton. Where did the latter come from?
    And then there's the street here in New York City, which we pronounce HOW-ston.

  7. #67
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    Asia : from L., from Gk. Asia, speculated to be from Akkad. asu "to go out, to rise," in reference to the sun, thus "the land of the sunrise."

    Makes it no less Eurocentric [which is quite natural].

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    And then there's the street here in New York City, which we pronounce HOW-ston.
    Yeah, thanks Kai. I´ve always wondered how it got mangled into Hues-ton.

  9. #69
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    There's a street called Demonbreun in Nashville, Tennessee. It's pronounced d'-MAHN-bree-un.

  10. #70
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    There's a city in Michigan, Charlotte, pronounced char-LOT. I hadn't heard about the Charlotte, NC city growing up, or known anyone named Charlotte, and laughed when I heard it first pronounced!

  11. #71
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    There was a Charlotte in our town which we used to call Char-LOT for a couple of reasons way beyond the board rules.

  12. #72
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    There's a Seattle suburb called Des Moines. The final "S" is always pronounced, unlike the city in Iowa.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Argos View Post
    Asia : from L., from Gk. Asia, speculated to be from Akkad. asu "to go out, to rise," in reference to the sun, thus "the land of the sunrise."

    Makes it no less Eurocentric [which is quite natural].
    Well, yes; that was my point. I don't use the word "Oriental" anymore, because the Asian people I've known didn't like it, but to claim that "Asian" is less Eurocentric just means that you know the Latin but not the possibly-Akkadian.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParaDoctor
    Greek words were often imported via Latin, which was then subject to palatalization.
    Quote Originally Posted by HenrikOlsen
    It's the same slip you see in other Latin C words, Caesar, (pronounced something like sea-zar in the english speaking world) became the word Kaiser(German)/Kejser(Danish) (meaning emperor) in the Germanic languages.

    I've read somewhere that it's now believed the original Latin pronunciation was K ...
    Don't forget "Czar." The pronunciation as "K" isn't exactly news amongst Latin scholars.

    The matter gets even more complicated when one is faced with the possibility that Latin, at one time at least, had three 'k' phonemes, although they may not have been very distinct.

    1. the c in caesar which has become s and ch in many languages,
    2. the k in kalendas which has always remained hard,
    3. the c in canis, which is related to the h in hound, at least at a proto-indoeuropean level.

    As for name changes, whatever happened to Peking and Bombay? What's next? "Moskva"?

  15. #75
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    I´ve always wondered how it got mangled into Hues-ton.

    What "mangled?" That's the way General Sam pronounced it and that's the way it should be.

    As for name changes, whatever happened to Peking and Bombay? What's next? "Moskva"?

    Well, Beijing is a closer spelling to the actual pronunciation, and Mumbai is the Indian name... and gets away from the colonial connection.

    How about Saigon? A beautiful name for a beautiful city no more.
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  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post

    Anybody have more?

    What ever happened to a town in China named Peking? I see it in old movies, but I can't find it on a map. It seems to have been a big city.

    Added: Dang, Jim beat me to it.
    Last edited by Sam5; 2009-Jan-27 at 10:03 PM. Reason: added text

  17. #77
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    Jim's right. The planet the astronauts come from is pronounced HUE-stun. As it is by all hue-STONE-ee-uns.

  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by ngc3314 View Post
    Example - famous astronomer E.E. Barnard pronounced his last name with stress on the first syllable, while somewhat less-famous astronomer/photographer/surveyor F.A.P. Barnard stressed the second. According to Don Osterbrock, a key clue was noting how these names were rhymed and scanned in surviving bits of doggerel from bored students. Hence BARnard's Star, BarNARD College.
    Around here everyone is familiar with St. Bernard. However, many of the Irish Catholics in my town attend St Bernard's---pronounced St Bernerd's.

    Go figure.

    tbm

  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    .............
    How about Saigon? A beautiful name for a beautiful city no more.
    At least these guys have given it a shot at lasting fame:

    http://www.google.com/musica?aid=1RA...usic&ct=result

    whoever they were, anyway (the band, that is).

    tbm

  20. #80
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    I think it makes sense to call cities by what the people who live there call them.

  21. #81
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    Well then, I live in Funkytown.

  22. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    I think it makes sense to call cities by what the people who live there call them.
    Well, please do. BTW, the sign below says "Please, not so fast.". Which is directed at traffic participants. The German word for traffic, "Verkehr", is also a synonym for the word on the upper sign.

    Warning! Link contains adult language, NSFW.
    Last edited by Jim; 2009-Jan-29 at 03:28 PM. Reason: Added warning.

  23. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves
    I think it makes sense to call cities by what the people who live there call them.
    Yeah, that sounds good, until one really starts doing it.

    First off, if you ever heard a Chinese national say the word Beijing, you wouldn't understand it. It sounds totally different. Since we can't get it even halfway right, why even bother differentiating between Peking and Beijing?

    I'd love to hear "München" (= Munich) or "Köln" (Cologne), just let me get my popcorn first. "Mönchengladbach" should be amusing.

    Ever been to Wien? That's pronounced "veen" and is also known as Vienna. Not to mention Firenze (Florenz), Venezia (Venice), Damsq (Damascus), etc. etc.

    Phonetically speaking, "Thee-oo-dad day Mechikoh" (Mexico City), "Yeah-roo-shah-lye-eem" (Jerusalem), or "Hahm-boorg" (Hamburg) should be good at a party. How about "Ashay-baerg" (the g as the second g in 'garage' - local pronunciation for Aschaffenburg)?

    Yup, it gets pretty complicated when taken seriously.

    Oops, I almost forgot "Noo Yoak" (New York).

  24. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by kleindoofy View Post
    Oops, I almost forgot "Noo Yoak" (New York).
    You got a problem wit dat?
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  25. #85
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    Well, please do.
    Maybe not that one...

  26. #86
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    My mother has a world atlas from Canada that, being Canadian, attempts to compromise. It uses the local spelling (or transliterated equivalent) for place names whenever possible, with the Anglicized version in both parentheses and a smaller font.

    It doesn't have "Beijing" though, as it predates the standardization of Pinyin.

  27. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    'Routes' is also pronounced 'rowts' by some, 'roots' by others.
    There's a few of us who pronounce it both ways, depending upon the context. For example, when planning for a trip, the question is, "What rowt are we going to take?" but when I see a road sign, it's, "Oh, look - there's the sign for root 66."

    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    And then there's the street here in New York City, which we pronounce HOW-ston.
    Well, that's just absolutely bonkers, Kai!

    (I'm kidding...)

  28. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    I think it makes sense to call cities by what the people who live there call them.
    But then you have to know how the locals say them. Here are two Utah towns that you'd think had a pretty standard pronunciation.

    Hooper
    Hurricane

    Hooper is pronounced HUP-per, and Hurricane is pronounced HUR-i-ken with the i using the short sound as in "it".

    Then we have Tooele and Oquirrh, which are Too-ILLA and OAK-er.
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  29. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by mugaliens View Post
    There's a few of us who pronounce it both ways, depending upon the context. For example, when planning for a trip, the question is, "What rowt are we going to take?" but when I see a road sign, it's, "Oh, look - there's the sign for root 66."
    Come to think of it, I'm one of those people.

  30. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by kleindoofy View Post
    First off, if you ever heard a Chinese national say the word Beijing, you wouldn't understand it.
    Uh, I have heard Chinese nationals say it - I was actually in Beijing at the time - and to say "you wouldn't understand it" is quite a stretch. It pretty much sounds exactly like "bay-jeeng."

    Quote Originally Posted by mugaliens View Post
    There's a few of us who pronounce it both ways, depending upon the context. For example, when planning for a trip, the question is, "What rowt are we going to take?" but when I see a road sign, it's, "Oh, look - there's the sign for root 66."
    Same here - but "root" itself is another odd one. Sometimes it rhymes with "boot", sometimes with "foot." Thinking about, I think the former is when it's a verb and the latter when it's a noun...
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