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kucharek
2004-Mar-02, 09:03 AM
Nearly...

http://www.esa.int/export/SPECIALS/Rosetta/index.html

Upper stage iginition in 7 minutes...

Unfortunatley, the BA doesn't allows countdowns here... ;-)

Keep your fingers crossed!

Harald

JohnOwens
2004-Mar-02, 09:08 AM
I forgot, how does CET relate to GMT? 1 hour or two? (It IS "Central European Time", right?

Regardless, it looks like the countdown we aren't having can come to an end now; the link now says it's off.

Edit: Oops, I see you were counting down to upper stage, rather than to launch. Never mind my second point.

kucharek
2004-Mar-02, 09:14 AM
I forgot, how does CET relate to GMT? 1 hour or two? (It IS "Central European Time", right?

Yes, CET is GMT+1. When DST starts (end of March), it will be CEST and GMT+2.

JohnOwens
2004-Mar-02, 09:17 AM
OK, when I went to Germany, it was in April, and I never did clear up whether the two hours was due to DST, or if they had an extra time zone between Germany and Greenwich. Glad I know that now, if I ever go back.

tusenfem
2004-Mar-03, 11:21 AM
Wow, it only took us here in Graz 3 parties to organize for the launch, but finally yesterday we could open the bottles of champagne (well, mostly prosecco actually). Go Rosetta Go!
And to clear up the times:
Europe apart from Britain naturally is on GMT+1, but the last sunday in March we change to DST (no not the deep sky telescope, daylight savings time) which puts us at GMT+2. So in April ... well you can figure it out.
Think about it, before WW2 there were many more non-1-hour zones, the Netherlands were, e.g. Berlin time - 40', i.e. GMT+20', that would be really confusing.

ToSeek
2004-May-26, 04:26 PM
Rosetts performs first scientific observations (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMONIHHZTD_index_0.html)


Rosetta has successfully performed its first scientific activity - observation of Comet Linear.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Feb-02, 08:40 AM
Report for the period 17 to 27 January 2005


The spacecraft is in cruise mode. In the reporting period a number of outstanding troubleshooting activities was carried out, in addition to the routine flight operations and monitoring tasks.



On 17 January a CCD health check on Star Tracker B was carried out, to confirm the existence of a hot pixel detected in December by the on-board software. This activity triggered other investigations on both Star Trackers, as on the same day Star Tracker A also detected a hot pixel. After power cycling both Star Trackers did not report any hot pixel anymore. A final CCD Health check was executed on 27 January and data are still being analysed.
....
At the end of the last New Norcia pass in the reporting period (DOY 027) Rosetta was at 13.4 million Km from the Earth. The one-way signal travel time was 44 sec.


http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=2279

http://www.esa.int/export/esaMI/Rosetta/

flash animation of its journey

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-May-04, 10:10 AM
images, now processed, are part of the first scientific data obtained by Rosetta.
“The Earth fly-by represented the first real chance to calibrate and validate the performance of the Rosetta’s instruments on a real space object, to make sure everything works fine at the final target”

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMT4V2IU7E_0.html

http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/rosetta_earth_photo.html?352005

:D

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Jul-18, 11:06 PM
Status report
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=37699
Quote
18 Jul 2005 16:09
Report for period 24 June to 15 July 2005

The spacecraft is in active cruise mode. The reporting period covers the first active science phase of the mission, dedicated to the observation of the NASA Deep Impact probe's encounter with comet Tempel-1.

The spacecraft was slewed to point its remote sensing payload instruments towards comet Tempel-1 on 28 June. The comet was constantly tracked until 14 July, following a complex profile designed to satisfy the observation requirements of the four active instruments, ALICE, MIRO, OSIRIS and VIRTIS. Three of the remote sensing instruments were active continuously from 29 June to 14 July. VIRTIS was operated only for a few hours around the predicted time of encounter of Deep Impact with the comet, on 4 July. Daily passes were taken with the New Norcia station throughout the reporting period, to downlink the scientific data collected during the observations. An average of 60 Mbytes of data were produced and downlinked every day.

The observation campaign was very successful. All instruments operated very well and their science data were collected as planned and are undergoing the first analyses. A few problems occurred with the commanding timing of OSIRIS and with the MIRO instrument but could be recovered in both cases within about 24 hours, with minor impact on the overall instrument operations and data return. The exercise was the first scientific planning and operations scenario over large scale and an extended period of time for the Rosetta mission. It provided an important experience and a wealth of lessons learned which will be very useful to design the spacecraft operations around Rosetta's target comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.


http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/ESAGJF7708D_0.html

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is a large dirty snowball that orbits the Sun once every 6.6 years. During this time, it commutes between the orbits of Jupiter and the Earth. However, little is known about it, despite its regular visits to the inner Solar System.
Rosetta will fly past Mars in February 2007, and two more Earth flybys: November 2007 and November 2009.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMRZF1PGQD_0.html

Animation of Rosetta's 12-year journey,
It performs three fly-bys of Earth and one fly-by of Mars, reaching the comet in 2014.

Launch window
2005-Oct-11, 02:43 PM
Rosetta report

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=38105

At the end of the reporting period (DOY 280) Rosetta was at 226.2 million km from Earth (1.51 AU; one-way signal travel time was 12 minutes and 34 seconds). The distance to the Sun was 252.4 million km (1.69 AU)

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Dec-23, 12:58 AM
Spacecraft Monitoring and Maintenance

12 Dec 2005 13:00
Report for Period 18 November to 9 December 2005

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=38408

The reporting period covers three weeks of passive cruise, with monitoring and minor maintenance activities.

On the spacecraft subsystems side, minor maintenance activities were executed, i.e. gyro drift compensation for IMP B, the first periodic dump of avionics standard parameters. Reaction wheel offloading is now executed once every two weeks.

Launch window
2006-Jan-10, 05:53 AM
for Period 9 December 2005 - 6 January 2006

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=38558
...At the end of the reporting period (DOY 006) Rosetta was at 360 million km from the Earth (2.40 AU; one-way signal travel time was 20m 00 s). The distance to Sun was 262 million Km (1.75 AU).
Future Milestones
Preparation for the first Solar Conjunction continues. The spacecraft will be at an angular distance from the Sun below 5 degrees between mid March and mid May 2006, with a minimum separation angle of about 0.3 degrees on the 13 April.
Just before the start of the Solar Conjunction the third Payload Passive Checkout (PC2) will take place in March 2006.
After the Solar Conjunction the spacecraft will be configured into Near Sun Hibernation Mode for a period of about 2 months, from end May to end July 2006.
Operations for the Mars swing-by (February 2007) will start in August 2006....

Launch window
2006-Mar-27, 05:37 PM
Rosetta images were submitted by amateur astronomers in Europe, Africa, Canada and USA for the "Rosetta Up Close" photo contest.
http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/rosetta/contest/index.html


more on it here
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=873&st=0
http://s4.invisionfree.com/RPGRMXP/index.php?showtopic=1428

Manchurian Taikonaut
2006-Jul-03, 06:27 PM
Report for Period 2 June to 30 June 2006
Operational Updates (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=39465)
The spacecraft will remain in Passive Cruise Mode until 26 July 2006. During the entire period, the spacecraft will be monitored on the basis of weekly ground station passes.

antoniseb
2006-Jul-03, 06:45 PM
I'm looking forward to the Mars swingby this winter.

Lord Jubjub
2006-Jul-12, 02:11 AM
Oh, wow, I wasn't paying close attention to space exploration at the time of launch. This is definitely something to keep an eye on when it reaches its target.

There would makes four long-term probes in the solar system (Messenger, New Horizons and Dawn[unlaunched] being the other three) that will start to return data in to 2010-2015 time frame. Or are there others that I am not aware of?

Launch window
2006-Nov-11, 01:26 PM
Mission Status
Rosetta Status Report - November 2006 (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=40366)
The Rosetta spacecraft and its payload are in excellent health and everything is set to prepare the Mars flyby on 25 February 2007.

Launch window
2007-Apr-02, 02:02 PM
Rosetta and New Horizons watch Jupiter in joint campaign (http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=22256)
ESA's Rosetta and NASA's New Horizons are working well together in their joint campaign to observe Jupiter. A preliminary analysis of the data from Rosetta's Alice ultraviolet spectrometer indicates that the data quality is excellent and that good science is expected to follow.

Launch window
2007-May-30, 05:19 PM
Rosetta Status Report - May 2007 (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=41030)

ToSeek
2007-Aug-29, 09:12 PM
Rosetta's Target Comet: Lumpy, Bumpy, Fluffy And Layered (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070824134155.htm)


Observational and theoretical studies of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of ESA’s Rosetta mission, are building a detailed portrait of the comet’s nucleus as it travels around the Sun.

Lord Jubjub
2007-Aug-29, 09:54 PM
Since, ToSeek has brought this thread up, I thought I'd just mention that Rosetta is passing inside Mars orbit this week. It had gotten a boost from Mars earlier this year and will get another boost from Earth this November (the second such boost).

Launch window
2007-Nov-12, 05:51 AM
Could comets have brought water and organic materials to Earth?
http://www.euronews.net/index.php?page=space&article=451670&lng=1
Europe's Rosetta mission is on route to find out. The spacecraft swings by the Earth this month, gaining speed on its 10- year quest. The ambitious race to catch a comet and probe the history of our solar system, in this editon of Space.

KaiYeves
2007-Nov-13, 12:58 AM
Rosetta, cracking the code!

eburacum45
2007-Nov-13, 04:14 AM
Rosetta not an asteroid, experts say.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/northern_ireland/7088754.stm

Also noted on this thread, I see...
Non-NEO Alert! (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomical-observing-equipment-accessories/66859-non-neo-alert.html)

01101001
2007-Nov-13, 07:58 PM
Planetary Society Weblog: Rosetta is closing in on Earth (http://planetary.org/blog/article/00001231/)


We're less than an hour away from Rosetta's Earth flyby; closest approach will happen south of South America at 20:57 UTC. The Rosetta flyby blog (http://webservices.esa.int/page.php) has some neat photos of screens of data being transmitted real-time from the spacecraft.

2057 UTC
1557 EST
1257 PST

Launch window
2007-Nov-14, 09:13 AM
Some fly by images of Antarctica taken 13/14 November

http://esamultimedia.esa.int/multimedia/esoc/nav_cam/index.html

Launch window
2007-Nov-15, 02:43 AM
"When it captured this image, Rosetta was about 80,000 km (50,000 miles) away from the Earth, above the Indian Ocean. It imaged the planet using its OSIRIS instrument."
http://www.universetoday.com/2007/11/14/rosetta-flyby-shows-the-earths-night-side/


New pics

OSIRIS images
- first downloads
http://webservices.esa.int/page.php?id=37976


Where is Rosetta now

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMRZF1PGQD_0.html

next stop asteroid steins

Noclevername
2007-Nov-15, 02:48 AM
Cool, we look like a night sky. :)

Laguna
2007-Nov-15, 02:40 PM
Just read on a German news site (http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/weltall/0,1518,517608,00.html) that rosetta has a companion, possibly an asteroid.

Launch window
2007-Nov-15, 02:49 PM
Just read on a German news site (http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/weltall/0,1518,517608,00.html) that rosetta has a companion, possibly an asteroid.

What are they saying, there really was an NEO ?

Dont worry about it, Bruce Willis can save us

Laguna
2007-Nov-15, 02:57 PM
Yes it passed earth at about 230000km following rosettas path. It just kept a greater distance when passing earth. The object is expected to drift farther away from rosetta as rosetta continues its journey. Its course was followed back to where rosetta came from when rosetta was taking its last swing by at mars.

Laguna
2007-Nov-15, 03:00 PM
The first, but rapidly excluded, fear was that it could be some debris from rosetta. Possibly a broken solar panel, the philae lander or the foil rosetta is wrapped in.

Laguna
2007-Nov-15, 03:09 PM
As i can find no information about this anywhere else I just asked the author for a source...

Laguna
2007-Nov-15, 09:17 PM
Nanananana... I got a reply.

I'm out of the office.
In urgent matters, please contact ...
:(

01101001
2007-Nov-16, 09:49 PM
Just read on a German news site (http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/weltall/0,1518,517608,00.html) that rosetta has a companion, possibly an asteroid.

Planetary Society Weblog: Son of Rosetta (http://planetary.org/blog/article/00001236/)


On the heels of the news last week that the Rosetta spacecraft was spotted by sky surveys and briefly named among the minor planets as 2007 VN84 came another close approach by a newly discovered near-Earth object, designated 2007 VF189, which had an orbit surprisingly similar to the Rosetta spacecraft, making a close approach to Earth (closer than the Moon, about 250,000 kilometers away) roughly six hours after Rosetta, on November 14.
[...]
In brief: the probability for there to be a random object so close in the sky to Rosetta is 1 in 70; the probability for Rosetta and this object to come close to Earth within 6 hours of each other is 1 in 10; and the probability that they would have velocities within 2.1 km/sec of each other is 1 in 10. Multiplying those together, you get a 1 in 7000 chance for Rosetta and another object to pass so close to each other, at nearly the same speed, near Earth. That's an interesting number, because it's not too likely, but neither is it vanishingly unlikely. Plenty of people bet lots of money on worse odds.

In the end, then, 2007 VF189 is a small, unremarkable Apollo-class object (meaning it's an Earth-orbit-crossing asteroid with an orbital period of longer than one year), and nobody would have paid much attention to it if not for last week's mixup.

Laguna
2007-Nov-17, 10:01 AM
Thanks 01101001 for the affirmation.
The only source I could find until yesterday night was Spiegel-Online.

So was Rosetta in fact the object that was held as an incoming asteroid or was it all a mixup with 2007 VF189?

01101001
2007-Nov-18, 05:36 PM
So was Rosetta in fact the object that was held as an incoming asteroid or was it all a mixup with 2007 VF189?

From reading it sure seems that 2007 VN84 (AKA Rosetta) was discovered and then shortly later 2007 VF189, independently.

The MPML (Yahoo group mpml · A list for asteroid and comet researcher (http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/mpml/)) probably has the whole tale. I have only sampled a couple of entries.

MPML: Discovery Circumstances of 2007 VF189 (http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/mpml/message/20026):


On the night of the 12th (UT) Andrea sent up to me his usual request to
follow up on objects that Alex Gibbs has discovered at 703 the night
before. When this field came up for validation, the original target was
recovered along with the object that is now known as 2007 VF189.

Maybe MPML: A real asteroid chasing the Rosetta probe? (http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/mpml/message/20008) will be the most productive of an answer:


After the fuss about 2007 VN84, the online version of the German
weekly "Der Spiegel" now has a story saying that a real asteroid is
chasing Rosetta!
[...]
So I am wondering if all this is maybe just a canard.

Launch window
2007-Nov-21, 08:35 AM
BA blogged Earth from Rosetta
http://www.badastronomy.com/bablog/2007/11/20/earth-from-rosetta/

Lord Jubjub
2008-Feb-03, 02:19 AM
Rosetta has recrossed Earth orbit and is heading outward. It will reach Mars orbit around the 1st of May.

Lord Jubjub
2008-Apr-27, 08:55 PM
Just a few days short of the 1st of May, actually. Rosetta will cross Mars orbit over the next 12 hours.

Edit: This crossing is simply a milestone in reaching the first point of interest in this mission. On 5 September, Rosetta will sweep past a small asteroid in the Main Belt.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2008-Jun-24, 05:26 PM
Asteroid Steins

73 days 01 hours

http://www.dmuller.net/rosetta/

01101001
2008-Jul-04, 03:47 AM
Asteroid Steins

ESA: Rosetta awakes from hibernation for asteroid encounter (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMQPDSHKHF_0.html) (3 July 2008):


Spacecraft controllers have just awoken Rosetta from hibernation to prepare for its encounter with asteroid (2867) Steins on 5 September. ESA’s comet chaser will study the relatively rare asteroid as it flies by on its way to comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
[...]
In preparation for the fly-by, all the instruments will be checked and tested through the month of July. Between 4 August and 4 September, spacecraft operators will conduct an optical navigation campaign: Steins will be tracked by the on-board cameras and the observations will be used to refine the knowledge of its orbit which has been derived only from ground-based measurements so far.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2008-Jul-26, 05:35 PM
Intense preparations for Rosetta's asteroid visit

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEM4OCXIPIF_0.html

BigDon
2008-Jul-26, 11:21 PM
Thank you for the heads up MT!

01101001
2008-Aug-06, 11:00 PM
Planetary Society: Planetary News: ESA's Rosetta Has Asteroid Steins in Sight (http://www.planetary.org/news/2008/0806_ESAs_Rosetta_Has_Asteroid_Steins_in.html)


ESA's flagship solar system mission Rosetta is fast approaching the next waypoint on its long journey to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. On September 5 at 18:37 UTC, the spacecraft will zoom past asteroid (2687) Steins, the spacecraft's first scientific target.

Steins has not before been visited by a spacecraft, so everything that is known about it is based on data from Earthbound telescopes. It is believed to be approximately 5 kilometers in diameter, and it is an E-type asteroid, a rare spectral class.

Lots of stuff. Includes a nice timeline of events September 1 to September 6.

Coming up next:


Sep 1
00:00 Other science instruments switched on
Sep 2
14:30 Trajectory Correction Maneuver
This and the following two maneuvers may be canceled if optical navigation results indicate that the spacecraft is on the proper course for the encounter.

Launch window
2008-Aug-20, 10:47 AM
Perfect sight: Rosetta cameras track asteroid target

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMC9R6UWJF_index_0.html

ryanmercer
2008-Aug-20, 11:09 AM
Sweet

01101001
2008-Sep-02, 04:05 AM
Planetary Society: Planetary News: ESA's Rosetta Has Asteroid Steins in Sight (http://www.planetary.org/news/2008/0806_ESAs_Rosetta_Has_Asteroid_Steins_in.html)

Other science instruments have been turned on.

Coming up (times UTC):



Sep 2
14:30 Trajectory Correction Maneuver
This and the following two maneuvers may be canceled if optical navigation results indicate that the spacecraft is on the proper course for the encounter.
Sep 4
05:00 Trajectory Correction Maneuver
16:00 End optical navigation campaign
The data must be returned to Earth quickly if the final Trajectory Correction Maneuver is to be performed.
Sep 5
05:00 Trajectory Correction Maneuver
08:00 Attempt to put cameras into tracking mode
17:57 Begin spacecraft flip
The spacecraft must rotate into a particular orientation in order to track Steins throughout the flyby while also keeping sensitive parts of the Philae lander out of direct solar illumination. The flip takes about 20 minutes to complete; during this time, the cameras should still be tracking the asteroid.
18:18 Entry into Asteroid Fly-By Mode
The spacecraft will now perform automatic tracking of the asteroid based upon information from the navigation cameras.
18:27 End telemetry from Rosetta
The geometry of the flyby will result in the spacecraft's high-gain antenna pointing away from Earth. Earth will be out of communication with Rosetta for about an hour.
18:35 Rosetta views Steins at "zero phase"
Rosetta will pass almost directly between the Sun and Steins, an unusual geometry that provides immensely valuable data on the way that the asteroid's surface reflects sunlight. The entire "globe" of Steins will be fully lit by the Sun.
18:37 Asteroid (2687) Steins Closest Approach (800 kilometers)
19:37 End Asteroid Fly-By Mode; start high-gain antenna rotation
Control of the spacecraft's orientation will be handed back from the optical navigation system to the spacecraft's internal sequences. At the same time, the high-gain antenna will begin to rotate back towards Earth. The rotation will take 25 minutes to complete. It is possible that the spacecraft will remain out of communication with Earth for 22 of those minutes, until 22:02.
20:25 Resume telemetry transmission with Earth
NASA's Goldstone radio antenna will receive Rosetta's communications.
21:25 Earliest possible start of scientific data reception on Earth
The first five hours of downlink will contain data from the OSIRIS and VIRTIS instruments. Then two more hours of VIRTIS, followed by data from the rest of the science instruments.
Sep 6
14:01 End first downlink


Edit: New Planetary Society Weblog entry: Rosetta's zeroing in on Steins (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001626/) (September 2)

01101001
2008-Sep-03, 03:04 AM
A few links:
ESA Rosetta Mission (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/index.html)
ESA Rosetta Blog (http://webservices.esa.int/blog/blog/5/)
ESA Rosetta Flyby Timeline (http://webservices.esa.int/blog/post/5/390)
Daniel Muller's (dmuller) Rosetta Real-Time Simulation, with Steins flyby countdown (http://www.dmuller.net/realtime/index.php?mission=rosetta)
Universe Today: Countdown to Asteroid Flyby (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/09/02/countdown-to-asteroid-flyby/)

01101001
2008-Sep-04, 06:36 AM
ESA: Asteroid (2867) Steins: A portrait (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMIXGO4KKF_0.html)


Size 4.6 km
Shape irregular but not elongated
Closest approach 5 September 2008, 20:58 CEST
Distance at closest approach 800 km
[...]
Steins is one of the rarest types of asteroids in the Solar System and holds clues on how the planets formed.

To date, planetary scientists have used various spacecraft to visit eight different asteroids, with six fly-bys and two close orbits. On 5 September 2008, the Rosetta spacecraft will make it nine.
[...]
Called an E-type asteroid, it may once have been part of the outer regions of a much larger asteroid, which has fragmented. Such E-type asteroids are quite rare.

01101001
2008-Sep-04, 11:12 PM
Coming soon...

Rosetta fly-by of asteroid Steins: press conference (first results & images) (http://rosetta.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=43347)


First results and images from Rosetta's fly-by of asteroid Steins will be presented at a press conference, which will be webcast live, on Saturday 6 September starting at 12:00 CEST [1000 UTC; 0600 EDT; 0300 PDT].

A number of presentations will be made during the press conference covering the Rosetta mission, the challenge of implementing the fly-by, and the first results and images.

01101001
2008-Sep-05, 12:15 AM
More Lakdawalla: Planetary Society Weblog: Rosetta's just a day away from Steins and now on target (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001629/) (September 4)


A later update on the blog indicates that this morning's maneuver was successful, and moreover that Rosetta's position may now be close enough to the desired target that the final maneuver slot, planned for tomorrow morning, just half a day before closest approach, might not be needed.

01101001
2008-Sep-05, 05:00 AM
13:58 to closest approach to Steins.

ESA Rosetta Flyby Timeline (http://webservices.esa.int/blog/post/5/390) (times CEST)

Currently 0700 CEST (0500 UTC; 0100 EDT; 2200 PDT).


5 September
07:20-10:20 Slot for possible trajectory correction manoeuvre (12 hours before
closest approach)

10:20 Navigation cameras switch to tracking mode - initially both used,
then use CAM 'A' only (to be decided)

11:00 Uplink fly-by commands for asteroid fly-by mode (AFM)
Includes an update to the command profile already on board & the
final updated AFM commands

20:18-20:38 Spacecraft 'flip over'
20:39 Spacecraft switches automatically to asteroid fly-by mode
20:48 High-gain antenna on hold
From 10 minutes before to about 1 hour after closest approach, the
high-gain antenna will not point to Earth. No telemetry will be received
until the spacecraft exits the asteroid fly-by mode.

20:56 Sun illuminates Rosetta from the back and the asteroid fully
20:58 Closest approach, at a planned distance of 800 km from the asteroid

21:58 Rosetta automatically exits asteroid fly-by mode, high-gain antenna
rotated to Earth pointing (until 22:05)
22:27 First post-fly-by acquisition of signal (AOS) - telemetry received via
NASA's Goldstone ground station
22:30 Start of science data download via Goldstone

01101001
2008-Sep-05, 03:58 PM
3 hours to closest approach.

Coming up:

Time is currently 1758 CEST (1558 UTC; 1158 EDT; 0858 PDT).


20:18-20:38 Spacecraft 'flip over'
20:39 Spacecraft switches automatically to asteroid fly-by mode
20:48 High-gain antenna on hold
From 10 minutes before to about 1 hour after closest approach, the
high-gain antenna will not point to Earth. No telemetry will be received
until the spacecraft exits the asteroid fly-by mode.

20:56 Sun illuminates Rosetta from the back and the asteroid fully
20:58 Closest approach, at a planned distance of 800 km from the asteroid

21:58 Rosetta automatically exits asteroid fly-by mode, high-gain antenna
rotated to Earth pointing (until 22:05)
22:27 First post-fly-by acquisition of signal (AOS) - telemetry received via
NASA's Goldstone ground station
22:30 Start of science data download via Goldstone

There is disparity in the various timelines. Emily Lakdawalla (and dmuller) have closest approach at 18:37 UTC (2037 CEST). The timeline above comes from an ESA Rosetta blog article (http://webservices.esa.int/blog/post/5/390). I don't know which is more up-to-date. The ESA Rosetta Blog entries show a live countdown clock that has it at 2058 CEST. A offhand comment in a very recent blog entry (http://webservices.esa.int/blog/post/5/408) has it around 2100 (2330 minus 2.5 hours). Anyone who knows, holler.

01101001
2008-Sep-05, 06:28 PM
30 minutes to closest approach

01101001
2008-Sep-05, 06:58 PM
Closest approach now

Check out the press conference tomorrow to see results:

Rosetta fly-by of asteroid Steins: press conference (first results & images) (http://rosetta.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=43347)


First results and images from Rosetta's fly-by of asteroid Steins will be presented at a press conference, which will be webcast live, on Saturday 6 September starting at 12:00 CEST [1000 UTC; 0600 EDT; 0300 PDT].

01101001
2008-Sep-05, 11:32 PM
ESA Rosetta News: Rosetta Steins fly-by confirmed (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMUOWO4KKF_0.html)


The Rosetta control room at ESA’s European Space Operations Centre, ESOC, received the first radio signal after closest approach to asteroid (2867) Steins at 22:14 CEST, confirming a smooth fly-by.

Closest approach took place at 20:58 CEST ground time, 20:38 CEST spacecraft time, at a distance of 800 km. Rosetta’s relative speed with respect to Steins was 8.6 km/sec, or about 31 000 km/h. The exact time of closest approach will be confirmed over the next few days after a detailed analysis of telemetry data.

KaiYeves
2008-Sep-05, 11:37 PM
Why do these things never happen durring free period?

Lord Jubjub
2008-Sep-06, 12:13 AM
Well, I guess that I can check that milestone off my long list of events from here to 2015. In exactly one year, this craft will be inside Mars orbit for the final time.

frankuitaalst
2008-Sep-06, 12:47 PM
Esa found a diamond in the sky !
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/index.html

01101001
2008-Sep-06, 01:34 PM
Esa found a diamond in the sky !
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/index.html

ESA Rosetta Mission News: Steins: A diamond in the sky (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMNMYO4KKF_index_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/Steins-FlyBy-Mosaic_large,0.jpg (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMNMYO4KKF_index_0.html)


Gerhard Schwehm, Mission Manager for Rosetta said, "It looks like a typical asteroid, but it is really fascinating how much we can learn from just the images. This is our first science highlight; we certainly have a lot of promising science ahead of us. I’m already looking forward to encountering our next diamond in the sky, the much bigger Lutetia."
[...]
The OSIRIS team expects that the images that they will retrieve from the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) will be of comparable resolution. This will add to the detailed colour information and hence to knowledge of the surface composition.
[...]
Science team members noted that the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) appears to have switched to safe mode a few minutes before closest approach, but switched back on after a few hours.

ESA Rosetta Mission (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/index.html)
ESA Rosetta Blog (http://webservices.esa.int/blog/blog/5/)

KaiYeves
2008-Sep-06, 07:42 PM
It looks sort of like an arrowhead to me.

01101001
2008-Sep-10, 06:56 PM
Planetary Society Weblog, 2 items:

Next Ladawalla Live Web Chat (in about 10 minutes) focuses on Steins and Rosetta. Article (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001636/) Ustream live web chat (http://www.ustream.tv/channel/emily-lakdawalla)

More Steins images. Article (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001637/)

Lord Jubjub
2009-May-03, 10:31 PM
Rosetta has been falling back towards the sun for awhile. It is crossing the orbit of the asteroid Lutetia, which it will encounter in the summer of 2010. It will cross Stein's orbit later this month.

Lord Jubjub
2009-Sep-05, 02:03 PM
Rosetta will cross the orbit of Mars today. In a couple of months, it will encounter Earth and be flung toward Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

01101001
2009-Oct-16, 11:01 PM
In a couple of months, it will encounter Earth and be flung toward Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Planetary Society Blog: Here comes Rosetta! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002170/)


Heads up! ESA's Rosetta comet-chasing mission is going to buzz by Earth again in less than a month. In anticipation of that event, Daniel Scuka has fired up the Rosetta blog again [...]

Remember two years ago? Planetary Society Blog: That's no near-Earth object, it's a spaceship! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001227/)


Indeed, today, the Minor Planet Center issued an Editorial Notice stating that further investigation has shown that the object briefly designated 2007 VN84 is, in fact, the Rosetta spacecraft [...]

slang
2009-Oct-16, 11:21 PM
Planetary Society Blog: Here comes Rosetta! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002170/)

We've seen Earth. Go grab a comet already!


Remember two years ago? Planetary Society Blog: That's no near-Earth object, it's a spaceship! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001227/)


"Who knew, by the way, that the European Space Agency had the technology and the budget to send a spacecraft off to orbit the Moon? Who knew that the Europeans even had a space agency?

:D

djellison
2009-Oct-17, 08:51 AM
WHo knew that we had a space agency? Nobody. School kids surveyed the summer after Mars Express arrived, and the summer that Huygens landed were asked, here in the UK, to name any organisation involved in the exploration of space.

NASA, of course, came top. Don't know came second. Russia and ESA came third together - just one point more than 'Ares 51' and two points more than 'Men in Black'.

The kids here in the UK don't even know Rosetta exists.

Lord Jubjub
2009-Nov-04, 11:03 PM
Nine days until Earth flyby. Here is the latest press release. (http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2009/11/04/Rosetta-ready-for-final-Earth-flyby/UPI-12451257356611/) For those who have been following this craft, there is really nothing new here.

djellison
2009-Nov-05, 09:10 AM
Rosetta, in the form of OSIRIS, has one of the most stunning cameras ever sent into deep space.

When Galileo flew past the Earth, twice, they took photos and created a movie
When NEAR flew past the Earth they took photos and created a movie
When MESSENGER flew past the Earth they took photos and created a movie

I've got £5 that says ESA, Rosetta and OSIRIS miss the opportunity to make a stunning, better than Full HD movie of an Earth flyby using OSIRIS. The opportunity to remind Europe that we paid a billion euros for this spacecraft that's out there.

OSIRIS has still not delivered a single item of data to the PDS or PSA since it launched five years ago.

ugordan
2009-Nov-05, 09:37 AM
OSIRIS has still not delivered a single item of data to the PDS or PSA since it launched five years ago.
Have no fear, they'll do that early in 2008 just as they promised.

Um, what year is this again?

djellison
2009-Nov-05, 11:27 AM
I'm sure it'll get posted with the Smart 1 data.

Launch window
2009-Nov-13, 09:41 AM
Nine days until Earth flyby. Here is the latest press release. (http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2009/11/04/Rosetta-ready-for-final-Earth-flyby/UPI-12451257356611/) For those who have been following this craft, there is really nothing new here.

check out the blog

http://webservices.esa.int/blog/blog/5/

Lord Jubjub
2009-Nov-13, 12:34 PM
Rosetta passed over the Pacific Ocean about five hours ago. The next time it will be even close to this area, it will be in orbit around Churyumov-Gerasimenko (or on it).

KaiYeves
2009-Nov-13, 07:48 PM
Gorgeous! I've got a new background...

bebe7
2009-Nov-14, 12:10 AM
Incredible...saw it on BBC...Kind of like that movie.

Lord Jubjub
2010-Mar-11, 02:31 AM
I should really check out JPL's space simulator site more frequently.

I had thought that Rosetta would pass Mars orbit this week. Turned out that it crossed Mars orbit on the third of March.

Oh well. . . on to Lutetia in July!

slang
2010-Apr-17, 10:01 AM
The Planetary Society blog: 21 Lutetia, Rosetta's July target (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002444/)


Rosetta is ESA's comet rendezvous mission, which will enter orbit around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in May 2014 after a decade-long cruise. On the way to the comet, it's had three flybys of Earth and two planned encounters with asteroids, one with Šteins on September 5, 2008 and the other planned for 21 Lutetia on July 10, 2010 -- that is, in less than three months.

The large asteroid is about the size of Saturn's moon Epimetheus, and the article has an image of the latter made by some guy Gordan :)

Lord Jubjub
2010-May-01, 02:19 PM
Four years from today, Rosetta is scheduled to enter orbit around Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Lord Jubjub
2010-Jun-17, 10:06 PM
Lutetia has been imaged by Rosetta. Here is the Planetary Society blog (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002554/).

01101001
2010-Jul-08, 04:55 AM
Planetary Society Blog: Three days to Lutetia for Rosetta! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002571/)


On July 10, 2010, at 15:44:56 UTC, the Rosetta spacecraft will fly within 3,162 kilometers of the largest asteroid yet visited by a spacecraft. Named (21) Lutetia, the 132-by-101-by-76-kilometer-diameter body is a puzzle to astronomers, who have been unable to determine its composition.
[...] ESA is doing a live stream webcast to help people around the world follow one of the biggest space events of 2010. You can watch ESA's streams here (http://www.livestream.com/eurospaceagency), here (http://www.esa.int/rosetta), or here (http://www.esa.int/ops); [...]

Closest approach
2010, July 10, 0845 (Earth receive 0910) PDT, Saturday
2010, July 10, 1145 (Earth receive 1210) EDT, Saturday
2010, July 10, 1545 (Earth receive 1610) UTC, Saturday
2010, July 10, 1745 (Earth receive 1810) CEST, Saturday

Webcast begins about 10 minutes before closest approach, Earth receive.

ESA: Rosetta Blog :: Lutetia Flyby Timeline (http://webservices.esa.int/blog/post/5/1218)

Lord Jubjub
2010-Jul-10, 09:22 PM
So now that Rosetta has passed Lutetia, anybody have news or pictures?

Zvezdichko
2010-Jul-10, 09:47 PM
Yes!

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM44DZOFBG_index_0.html

http://webservices.esa.int/blog/blog/5/

This is indeed a great PR for the European Space Agency, a whole bunch of images have been released. Some people say why I don't complain about ESA. How could I complan when we had such a great PR?

baric
2010-Jul-11, 04:58 AM
Yes!

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM44DZOFBG_index_0.html

http://webservices.esa.int/blog/blog/5/

This is indeed a great PR for the European Space Agency, a whole bunch of images have been released. Some people say why I don't complain about ESA. How could I complan when we had such a great PR?

Where is the video of Rosetta passing by the asteroid?

Zvezdichko
2010-Jul-11, 06:24 AM
Make one using this:

http://www.esa.int/images/1_Lutetia_frames.jpg

:D

kucharek
2010-Jul-11, 08:44 AM
Lutetia and Saturn caught in one frame. Great shot!

http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/lutecia_saturn.html

bunker9603
2010-Jul-11, 05:57 PM
Lutetia and Saturn caught in one frame. Great shot!

http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/lutecia_saturn.html

That is a fantastic image!

KaiYeves
2010-Jul-12, 01:26 AM
Okay, so after finishing my multiple hours of homework for class tomorrow, I logged onto the computer for a bit and saw the new pictures of Lutetia. Then, I decided to dash off to the Peabody Museum before dinner, and chose to explore the Hall of Minerals, having only been in the dinosaur halls before. I touched an example of an iron meteorite they had on display... and then realized that, a few hours before, I'd seen pictures of something very like the progenitor of what I was touching.

And then I got very tingly all over.

Swift
2010-Jul-12, 01:35 PM
Lutetia and Saturn caught in one frame. Great shot!

http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/lutecia_saturn.html
Minor thread-jack, but hi kucharek, how are you? Seems like it has been awhile since you've been around.

Swift
2010-Jul-20, 04:39 PM
In her recent blog article (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002585/) she has a new photo montage comparing the relative sizes of all asteroids and comets visited by spacecraft as of June 2010.


The total of four comets and nine asteroid systems (including ten separate bodies) that have been examined up close by spacecraft are shown here to scale with each other (100 meters per pixel, in the fully enlarged version). Most of these were visited only briefly, in flyby missions, so we have only one point of view on each; only Eros and Itokawa were orbited and mapped completely.

Lord Jubjub
2010-Jul-20, 11:56 PM
Her projected poster including Vesta and Ceres leaves me wondering how they could be integrated into such a poster. Ceres is a dwarf planet so it could be left off.

Hop_David
2010-Jul-21, 07:46 PM
Her projected poster including Vesta and Ceres leaves me wondering how they could be integrated into such a poster. Ceres is a dwarf planet so it could be left off.

Well if she puts Ceres in the lower part of the poster and Vesta in the upper left, her existing poster could fit easily in the upper right quadrant. It might look something like this:
http://clowder.net/hop/TMI/asteroids.jpg

ozprof
2011-Jun-09, 02:43 PM
G'Day all,

Could not find a recent thread on Rosetta so though I would post this to a new thread.

News item from the BBC. Rosetta has successfully entered a hibernation period which should last until January 2014.

The item also includes an image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko taken by Rosetta.

Cheers

Ozprof

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-13701808

Lord Jubjub
2011-Jun-11, 12:35 AM
Sorry, this thread (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/10007-rosetta-its-way.html) is the one I've been using to update everyone. Since Rosetta was about to enter hibernation, the news from it has been pretty much nonexistent.

Swift
2011-Jun-11, 02:24 AM
To keep it tidy, I've merged the two threads

slang
2012-Apr-01, 04:44 PM
Two years left. Nice article on BA blog: Rosetta: mission to land on a comet (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2012/03/30/rosetta-mission-to-land-on-a-comet/). No real news for those following the mission, but maybe a nice introduction for those who were barely out of diapers when it launched. :)

publiusr
2012-Apr-01, 08:13 PM
And this is why I have been so skeptical about gravity tractor missions. Imagine if Rosetta was a gravity tractor sent to this object--except that it was going to strike Earth. It would take a lot of time for the gravity tractor to take effect--and that would only begin when it reaches its target. As we see here, Rosetta is still on its way.

antoniseb
2012-Apr-01, 10:44 PM
And this is why I have been so skeptical about gravity tractor missions. ...

This is a fairly distant tangent to the main thread. We can move it to a new thread if you like. Personally, I don't think that a tractor mission to a comet will be built with chemical rocket technology. We'll need something faster. Rosetta, on the other hand was launched at a time when we had nothing economical that is faster, so in two years, it will land after a long multi-assist ballistic voyage through the solar system. Hooray for Rosetta! Getting there soon with technology we have and can afford.

publiusr
2012-Apr-02, 09:51 PM
This is a fairly distant tangent to the main thread. We can move it to a new thread if you like.

No need, I just suggested it as an aside. I wish Rosetta well.

Lord Jubjub
2012-Apr-03, 10:23 PM
This is a fairly distant tangent to the main thread. We can move it to a new thread if you like. Personally, I don't think that a tractor mission to a comet will be built with chemical rocket technology. We'll need something faster. Rosetta, on the other hand was launched at a time when we had nothing economical that is faster, so in two years, it will land after a long multi-assist ballistic voyage through the solar system. Hooray for Rosetta! Getting there soon with technology we have and can afford.

I think if we had a comet guaranteed to hit Earth, the money would magically appear. Whether or not the technology would also like appear is the important question.

MaDeR
2012-Apr-07, 03:10 PM
And this is why I have been so skeptical about gravity tractor missions. Imagine if Rosetta was a gravity tractor sent to this object--except that it was going to strike Earth. It would take a lot of time for the gravity tractor to take effect--and that would only begin when it reaches its target. As we see here, Rosetta is still on its way.
I assure you if this kind of object was going to hit Earth, tractor would arrive faster. Rosetta have no reason to hurry up and use cheap, slow, low energy trajectory to move through solar system. So this comparison is useless and criticism of tractors on these grounds is wrong.

publiusr
2012-Apr-07, 05:06 PM
How can you say its wrong when you don't even know what the trajectory of the next impactor is? Flybys are easier. Trying to match a trajectory means you have certain launch windows/certain opportunities that only exist at certain times and cannot always be 'hurried up' as you put it.

The terms "hurry" and "Gravity Tractor" don't go together.

Electric drives open up some flexibility, but you must remember than--even as the spin of the Earth helps in the launch of LVs near the equator--Earths rotation about the sun also give the spacecraft a boost--which may not always be what is wanted.

Ironically, the fastest way to the sun is to Jupiter, where the opposite of a gravity assist is needed. Dump speed, and you can fall then inward to the sun.

Swift
2012-Apr-07, 07:21 PM
This is a fairly distant tangent to the main thread. We can move it to a new thread if you like. Personally, I don't think that a tractor mission to a comet will be built with chemical rocket technology. We'll need something faster. Rosetta, on the other hand was launched at a time when we had nothing economical that is faster, so in two years, it will land after a long multi-assist ballistic voyage through the solar system. Hooray for Rosetta! Getting there soon with technology we have and can afford.
antoniseb didn't use the mod color, so maybe you folks didn't take it seriously enough.

So I'm going to make it very clear and very official - stop the thread hijack now. If you want to discuss gravity tractors, start a new thread or find a thread on that topic (it has been discussed before). If there is a post in this thread that is important enough to move, ask real nice and we will move it. Otherwise, stick to Rosetta.

Launch window
2012-Dec-02, 07:57 PM
Almost a year from now, 20 January 2014 Rosetta starts the hibernation exit sequence, the craft is currently in "resource saving mode ". The Redorbit site recently covered Europe's previous comet hunting missions
do you guys think Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko will be like Comet Halley? Some of those comets have very interesting magnetosheaths and streamer

http://www.redorbit.com/news/space/1112736433/revisiting-comet-halley-112612/

slang
2012-Dec-07, 12:25 AM
Almost a year from now, 20 January 2014 [...]

2014 seemed so incredibly far away when Rosetta launched. Now we're almost there. Time flies.

Launch window
2013-Nov-14, 03:56 AM
Rosetta Simulation
http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2013/11/08/rosetta-flight-control-team-training-at-esoc/

Lord Jubjub
2013-Nov-19, 09:42 PM
Anyone know when Rosetta will be brought out of hibernation?

spjung
2013-Nov-19, 10:36 PM
Anyone know when Rosetta will be brought out of hibernation?

1000 GMT on Jan 20, 2014 according to the ESA site. http://sci.esa.int/rosetta/53055-rosetta-100-days-to-wake-up/

slang
2014-Jan-09, 11:30 PM
Finally, it's 2014! *starts looking for a paper calendar to mark, and humming Magic Carpet Ride. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4WiyxXpyZc)*

slang
2014-Jan-18, 01:03 AM
Monday, 20 Jan 2014 - 10:15 CET: ROSETTA WAKE-UP

On Monday 20 January, ESA’s comet-chasing spacecraft Rosetta will wake up from 31 months of deep space slumber. ESA will streaming live from ESOC, Darmstadt, Germany, with full coverage of the day’s historic events as they unfold, starting at 09:15 GMT (10:15 CET)
(04:15 EST)


Rosetta’s computer is programmed to re-establish contact with Earth on 20 January, starting with an ‘alarm clock’ at 10:00 GMT. Immediately afterwards, the spacecraft’s startrackers will begin to warm up, taking around six hours. Rosetta will then send a signal to Earth to announce that it is awake. The first window of opportunity to receive a signal is between 17:30-18:30 GMT.
The event can also be followed via www.livestream.com/eurospaceagency (embed code available)

http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/esalive

(which, right now, plays an annoyingly short music loop)

ToSeek
2014-Jan-18, 02:23 AM
Rosetta: To Chase a Comet (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2014-015&utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=NASAJPL&utm_content=rosetta20140117)


NASA is participating in the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission, whose goal is to observe one such space-bound icy dirt ball from up close -- for months on end. The spacecraft, festooned with 25 instruments between its lander and orbiter (including three from NASA), is programmed to "wake up" from hibernation on Jan. 20. After a check-out period, it will monitor comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it makes its nosedive into, and then climb out of, the inner solar system. Over 16 months, during which old 67P is expected to transform from a small, frozen world into a roiling mass of ice and dust, complete with surface eruptions, mini-earthquakes, basketball-sized, fluffy ice particles and spewing jets of carbon dioxide and cyanide.

"We are going to be in the cometary catbird seat on this one," said Claudia Alexander, project scientist for U.S. Rosetta from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "To have an extended presence in the neighborhood of a comet as it goes through so many changes should change our perspective on what it is to be a comet."

slang
2014-Jan-18, 10:43 PM
And a Rosetta wake-up story (http://www.universetoday.com/108254/wake-up-rosetta/) on Universe Today.

slang
2014-Jan-20, 11:38 AM
About 6 more hours until the first window of opportunity to receive a signal.

iquestor
2014-Jan-20, 05:30 PM
should be any minute now! come on Rosetta! Wake Up!!

Eadfrith
2014-Jan-20, 06:00 PM
ohhh.... it's quiet so far.

Certassar
2014-Jan-20, 06:05 PM
Does the wake-up function by any chance have a snooze button?

ozprof
2014-Jan-20, 06:19 PM
Its Awake!!!!!!!! :D

Swift
2014-Jan-20, 06:25 PM
From the mission blog (http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/)

@ESA_Rosetta is talking!


ESA TV is showing a happy press conference.

slang
2014-Jan-20, 07:25 PM
“Hello, world!"

Cute.

ravens_cry
2014-Jan-20, 08:46 PM
As long as it doesn't start to sing "Daisy Bell" . . .

KaiYeves
2014-Jan-20, 09:02 PM
Yay, Rosetta!

marsbug
2014-Jan-20, 11:27 PM
Good spaceship! Well done!

Rosetta, Dawn, New Horizons, and Osiris-Rex launching. The next two years are going to be a good time for fans of small worlds! :) :) :) :D

ravens_cry
2014-Jan-21, 12:26 AM
As the Earth grows smaller, our world grows larger. Hats off to Rosetta and her team; enlarge our world!

Local Fluff
2014-Jan-26, 05:01 PM
I'm surprised to see that Rosetta is (or has been) a bit further away from the Sun that the orbit of Jupiter, 800 vs 780 million km. If I'm not missing something that'd be the 7th probe to get that far (after Pioneers, Voyagers, Cassini, New Horizons). And the first one which uses Solar power. Dawn at Ceres would be a candidate for the 8th furthest probe ever, unless some Japanese asteroid probe got that far too.

I wonder if Rosetta brought any instrument to find out how 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is pronounced? It seems to be a mystery to everyone who talks about the topic.

slang
2014-Jan-26, 07:21 PM
Rosetta pronounces it as "Home", and it knows its Japanese fellow probe as Hayabusa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayabusa), launched one year earlier on an ill-fated but spectacular mission.

molesworth
2014-Jan-27, 02:29 PM
I wonder if Rosetta brought any instrument to find out how 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is pronounced? It seems to be a mystery to everyone who talks about the topic.

As far as I know, it's pretty much phonetically as written, although I'm not 100% sure whether it's a hard or soft "G" in Gerasimenko. (I have to wrap my tongue round it once a year when I cover it for lectures. Maybe I should check for any Russian students this year who could help out...)

ravens_cry
2014-Jan-27, 10:14 PM
Yeah, Russian names aren't hard. They are chewy and are best taken slowly, but they are not hard as such.

Lord Jubjub
2014-Jan-27, 11:41 PM
I wonder if Rosetta brought any instrument to find out how 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is pronounced? It seems to be a mystery to everyone who talks about the topic.

The 'ch' is pronounced as the English 'ch' and the 'g' is soft. From what I can detect from various spoken renditions: Chu RY u mov GER as i Menk o.

Lord Jubjub
2014-Mar-27, 10:04 PM
Rosetta has spotted her target! (http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2014/03/Rosetta_s_first_sighting_of_its_target_in_2014_nar row_angle_view)

selvaarchi
2014-Mar-28, 05:43 AM
Good luck Rosetta, safe landing :D

selvaarchi
2014-Mar-30, 10:24 AM
Comet lander awakes from long hibernation

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Comet_lander_awakes_from_long_hibernation_999.html


The lander is travelling aboard an unmanned probe called Rosetta which will make an historic rendezvous with Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, currently 650 million kilometres (400 million miles) from Earth, this summer.

In November, the Philae lander is due to descend to the comet, anchoring itself before using an array of 10 instruments to probe the surface and analyse its dusty ice.

selvaarchi
2014-Apr-03, 11:46 AM
Updates on Rosetta & Philae lander

http://spaceflightnow.com/rosetta/140401philae/#.Uz1I2qKpx1E


Since the Rosetta spacecraft emerged from hibernation in January, engineers have checked the probe's systems and found them in good condition, according to Andrea Accomazzo, Rosetta's spacecraft operations manager at the European Space Agency.

Lord Jubjub
2014-May-06, 09:43 PM
Anybody have news on Rosetta? From earlier reports, Rosetta should be close enough to the comet to acquire it as a target and begin to more actively move toward it.

antoniseb
2014-May-07, 07:14 PM
The mission website says that today they start a series (through end of July) of burn maneuvers to slow their approach and get to the target.

http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/05/07/thruster-burn-kicks-off-crucial-series-of-manoeuvres/

ozprof
2014-May-07, 10:42 PM
And here is a news item from the BBC that says they have started the burn maneuvers.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27315877

Swift
2014-May-16, 08:48 PM
And now the target is starting to get active

Nature News Blog (http://blogs.nature.com/news/2014/05/comet-begins-to-steam-off-as-rosetta-homes-in.html)


Hurtling through space at thousands of kilometres per hour, the comet-chasing Rosetta spacecraft has photographed its target spewing out gas and dust as both get closer to the Sun.

The €1-billion (US$1.4-billion) European Space Agency spacecraft woke up in January this year after almost three years in hibernation. By August it hopes to catch up with the comet before setting down its lander, Philae, on the surface in November. This will be the first time a soft-landing has been attempted on a comet.

The images from Rosetta’s OSIRIS camera, released by ESA today, show 67P-Churyumov–Gerasimenko increasingly releasing gas and dust over six weeks, from 27 March to 4 May. During that time Rosetta closed the distance to the comet from around 5 million kilometres to 2 million kilometres.



An animated series of images is shown on the blog.

selvaarchi
2014-May-17, 02:00 PM
Well done Europe :clap: Good luck Rosetta and safe landing Philae.

KaiYeves
2014-May-17, 02:59 PM
This will be a great summer...

slang
2014-May-19, 10:33 PM
This will be a great summer...

It better be, we waited more than TEN years for it! That, and because my plants need more sun. ;)

ozprof
2014-May-22, 01:52 PM
It appears that Rosetta has successfully completed a major course adjustment.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27517090

"Wednesday's big burn was initiated at 15:23 GMT (16:23 BST; 17:23 CEST). It was intended to take out a big chunk (almost 300m/s) of the velocity Rosetta had (755m/s) with respect to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko."

Lord Jubjub
2014-Jun-10, 09:52 PM
The Planetary Society is reporting (http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2014/06100747-rosetta-update-second-big.html) that Rosetta finished its second (and last) major burn near perfectly.

Interesting note on how much faster things move in the inner solar system. Rosetta is about 300,000 km from its target and will reach it in less than 60 days. That includes the extra time necessary to enter orbit. New Horizons will reach a similar distance from Pluto early this November but won't reach its target (pretty much maintaining its current speed) for 8 months.

selvaarchi
2014-Jun-11, 01:38 PM
The NASA instruments on board Rosetta are beginning observations and sending science data back to Earth.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/prnewswire-space-news.html?doc=201406101627PR_NEWS_USPR_____DC46491&showRelease=1&dir=0&categories=AEROSPACE-AND-SPACE-EXPLORATION&andorquestion=OR&&passDir=0,1,2,3,4,5,6,15,17,34


The three U.S. instruments aboard the spacecraft are the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO), an ultraviolet spectrometer called Alice, and the Ion and Electron Sensor (IES). They are part of a suite of 11 science instruments aboard the Rosetta orbiter.

antoniseb
2014-Jun-11, 02:12 PM
The Planetary Society is reporting (http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2014/06100747-rosetta-update-second-big.html) that Rosetta finished its second (and last) major burn near perfectly.

Interesting note on how much faster things move in the inner solar system. Rosetta is about 300,000 km from its target and will reach it in less than 60 days. That includes the extra time necessary to enter orbit. New Horizons will reach a similar distance from Pluto early this November but won't reach its target (pretty much maintaining its current speed) for 8 months.

That can't be right. I think you're off by a factor of 1000 for how far New Horizons will be in November.

Lord Jubjub
2014-Jun-11, 09:36 PM
That can't be right. I think you're off by a factor of 1000 for how far New Horizons will be in November.

You're right. I converted meters to kilometers twice in my calculations for New Horizons. Never mind. . .

selvaarchi
2014-Jun-24, 03:33 AM
The targeted comet keeps throwing up surprises. The dust cloud observed surrounding it was not there from photographs taken on June 4th and it is not so bright. Rosetta is now less than 100,000 miles from the comet. For comparison the moon is on average 239,000 miles from earth.

http://m.space.com/26316-rosetta-spacecraft-comet-quiet-photo.html

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

Superluminal
2014-Jun-25, 03:54 AM
Perhaps, in August, we should start a new thread called, "Rosetta is There".

Swift
2014-Jun-25, 02:09 PM
Perhaps, in August, we should start a new thread called, "Rosetta is There".
That's a good idea, we've done it with similar missions. Please feel free to do so.

selvaarchi
2014-Jul-07, 11:54 AM
Only a month to go and Rosetta keeps giving more surprising information on the comet. This time surprising scientists who did not expect to see outgassing of water from the comet so far away.

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/rosetta/140706burns/#.U7qGhbHm4SM


Arrival at Churyumov-Gerasimenko is scheduled for Aug. 6, when Rosetta will become the first spacecraft to ever enter orbit around a comet.

On July 6, Rosetta's distance to the comet was less than 35,000 kilometers, or about 22,000 miles. As the craft's range to Churyumov-Gerasimenko decreases, Rosetta's cameras are getting a better picture of the unexplored comet.

Lord Jubjub
2014-Jul-15, 09:33 PM
OK, this mission just got a lot more interesting. It appears that C-G is a contact binary (http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2014/07150633-quick-rosetta-update.html)! Or, as a poster in the related thread mentioned, it has undergone some really weird outgassing.

Swift
2014-Jul-16, 01:23 AM
Wow, very cool.

Superluminal
2014-Jul-16, 09:28 PM
Wow, very cool.
What would be cool, would be if one piece is an asteroid and the other a comet nucleus. We could study a comet and asteroid side by side.

ravens_cry
2014-Jul-17, 04:10 AM
Am I the only one who thinks they look like some very male equipment the way they're joined together?:whistle:

Superluminal
2014-Jul-17, 06:53 AM
Am I the only one who thinks they look like some very male equipment the way they're joined together?:whistle:
You're right. From one angle it does look like a male hiking boot.

Zvezdichko
2014-Jul-17, 07:29 AM
An access to data:

http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/07/16/access-to-rosetta-data/#comment-35869

And my comment:

Greetings,

I personally understand your point of view, though I don't agree with it. I understand it, because I'm involved in research activity. However, there is science and science. Not everything that the scientist does is interesting to other people. Those of us who work in a lab know it very well - cleaning glassware and other mundane activities.

In space, it's the same. Dozens of satellites work in Earth Orbit and most of them are of no interest to the general public.

Those who are of interest to the public, however, are space probes that are doing things for a very first time, that set new records. Let's remind you that this week we're celebrating 45 years since Apollo landings :) Time passes by and there are less and less objects to explore in the Solar system, less and less "firsts". Orbiting and landing a comet will be an amazing first.

People want to participate in certain "firsts". You should understand that some missions are more interesting than others and some missions have high demand of data from other people. And people, to remind you, live in a society with priorities that have changed. People in general are no longer interested in funding government mission, in which they have no part. That's why, for example, space tourism is exciting. But that's exactly why projects like Constellation and human bases on the moon did not interest people and those projects got canceled - people just don't want government limousines for selected people. Applying this to planetary missions doing "first", people are not interested in funding such missions and if they don't play direct part in them.

Publishing photos in almost real-time gives us the ability to feel part of those missions. That's why Spirit, Oppy and Curiosity were so successful. That's why they're praised.

People don't understand scientific process. And frankly, they shouldn't. Most of them are not aware with terms like peer review and impact factor. But the fact they don't know about it, doesn't render the scientific process immune to criticism. So many people claim: space exploration is a waste of money, we need those money elsewere.

Just give the public a chance to ride with you, guys! And don't worry that they will undermine the scientific results. Most of those fans are (as I said above) not interested in writing academic articles. They won't rob you of scientific results. They just want a seat on your spaceship, as tourists. When I travel around the world, I'm not doing science. I just travel.

Best wishes!

Svetoslav.

KaiYeves
2014-Jul-17, 01:31 PM
OK, this mission just got a lot more interesting. It appears that C-G is a contact binary (http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2014/07150633-quick-rosetta-update.html)! Or, as a poster in the related thread mentioned, it has undergone some really weird outgassing.

Wild! It does look like a boot.

selvaarchi
2014-Jul-17, 02:27 PM
Am I the only one who thinks they look like some very male equipment the way they're joined together?:whistle:
No way, that is a rubber duckie:p

Superluminal
2014-Jul-17, 11:12 PM
http://sci.esa.int/science-e-media/img/54/Rosetta_OSIRIS_NAC_comet_67P_20140714_movie_625.gi f
Looks like something I've never seen in space before. 36 images taken every 20 min. If I'm correct that's a 12 hour period. That's going to be a real challenge to land on it.

transreality
2014-Jul-17, 11:34 PM
The Yorp effect spins up the cometary body. If this is a rubble pile then eventually it stretches apart into two lobes. If the bodies were then subject to a gravity perturbation, such as a planetary conjunction, would it not be possible that the orientation of the two lobes could be distorted and be bought back into contact with each other, side by side? That is, these two nuclei could have both emerged from the same original body and have never separated or collided. Of course, this is something that the mission should be able to easily rule out.

Squink
2014-Jul-18, 12:43 PM
http://sci.esa.int/science-e-media/img/54/Rosetta_OSIRIS_NAC_comet_67P_20140714_movie_625.gi f
Looks like the spin centers on some point inside the neck between the two pieces.
Given the size differences, could we have a metallic body and a larger icy/rocky body here?

publiusr
2014-Jul-26, 05:48 PM
Looks like the spin centers on some point inside the neck between the two pieces.


I wonder if that is where Philae is going to have to land. I know the spin is exaggerated in images, but could it still be too fast for the lander to deal with?

Heathen
2014-Jul-26, 10:40 PM
Looks like the safest option, as close as possible to the center of rotation. Still risky. Have to dodge the outer lobes to reach the saddle-point. Is that the right word? Where the two lobes join.

Superluminal
2014-Jul-27, 07:18 AM
Looks like the safest option, as close as possible to the center of rotation. Still risky. Have to dodge the outer lobes to reach the saddle-point. Is that the right word? Where the two lobes join.
It's rotation rate is about 12 hours, so its not spinning as fast as it looks. What is the relitive speed between Rosetta and 67C-G? Must be very slow for the weak gravity of a comet to capture Rosetta into orbit.

Squink
2014-Jul-27, 10:37 PM
Escape velocity is only half a meter per second (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/67P/Churyumov%E2%80%93Gerasimenko), so orbit'll have to be slow.
Weird thing is overall density appears to be ~0.1 to 0.4 g/cc. I thought wikipedia might be mistaken, but that number checks out elsewhere.
At that density, you'd think loose dust pile with some ice, but dust doesn't form into distinct structural lobes like we're seeing. Perhaps the unusual shape throws off the mass calcs?

ravens_cry
2014-Jul-28, 03:48 AM
Geeze, I can walk faster than that! Small world, indeed!

Squink
2014-Jul-28, 11:26 PM
Center of mass is in the neck (http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/news/surface_impressions_rosetta%E2%80%99s_comet):
Scientists believe this waist to be a gravitational low: since it contains the body’s center of mass, emitted material that cannot leave the comet’s gravitational field is most likely to be re-deposited there.

Heathen
2014-Jul-31, 02:30 AM
Hypnotic animation. Ten minutes later.......is there a ' conservation of rotation rule'? Specifically, if the two parts were separated, gently, would they simply split the difference? Two objects with six hour rotation rates?

Squink
2014-Jul-31, 09:32 PM
2,000 Kilometers to Go (http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2014/07/31/rosetta_from_2000_km_spacecraft_starts_to_see_come t_detail.html)
That is one odd looking comet (http://www.mps.mpg.de/3701561/PM_2014_07_31_Rosetta-Komet_Anzeichen_von_Aktivitaet)!

Eadfrith
2014-Aug-01, 08:25 PM
uh oh lol... a new image just accidentally leaked.

Superluminal
2014-Aug-02, 10:28 AM
I remember when I first read about Rosetta, I think Clinton was still potus. The launch was still years away, and even then nearly a decade to reach its target! It was kinda hard to get excited about the mission. Now that its almost there, this is starting to be one of the most exciting missions in a long time.

Squink
2014-Aug-02, 04:39 PM
Low density, high rigidity. Perhaps we have an aerogel here?

publiusr
2014-Aug-02, 07:33 PM
More likely heating/exposure over time giving a little crust?

marsbug
2014-Aug-02, 11:43 PM
Average surface temperature is reported to be in the region of -70 deg C (http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Rosetta_takes_comet_s_temperature), suggesting a crust over the ice.

Squink
2014-Aug-03, 03:10 AM
uh oh lol... a new image just accidentally leaked.
New Rosetta images show comet's craggy shape (http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2014/08020736-rosetta.html)
the newly released OSIRIS image, which seems to have come out this weekend in response to a leak:
OSIRIS view of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko on August 1, 2014

selvaarchi
2014-Aug-03, 01:45 PM
Rosetta keeps uncovering more interesting information on the comet. The latest being, the comet is not covered by ice. It is too warm!!!

http://spaceflightnow.com/rosetta/140802temperature/#.U947mEBh5OQ


Initial observations from an imaging spectrometer aboard Europe's Rosetta spacecraft show the comet it is chasing has a dark, dusty surface instead of one covered in ice, scientists said Friday.

Jerry
2014-Aug-03, 05:02 PM
Low density, high rigidity. Perhaps we have an aerogel here?
Or popcorn. Seriously. Too warm to be ice - it is going to turn out to be very much like the other comet/asteroids we have visited, and made out of materials too dense to have an over-all density of <0.4 gm/cc. And the conclusion will be that it is 90+% voids by volume even though the surface is garden-variety regoth. Unreal, yet nobody is quite ready to start tamping new terms into the gravitational equations. (Rosetta will be hanging around for long enough - about a year - to highly constrain a second-order term that is tied to orbital distance from large bodies.) This is already very interesting, and it could get better.

Jerry
2014-Aug-03, 05:06 PM
Am I the only one who thinks they look like some very male equipment the way they're joined together?:whistle:

Most of us are seeing boots or rubber duckies.

selvaarchi
2014-Aug-04, 07:12 AM
More amazing pictures from Rosetta. Check it out. I am certain I can make out an eye on the head. See if you can spot it.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2014/08/02/rosetta_pic_of_comet_from_1000_km.html

ravens_cry
2014-Aug-04, 07:44 AM
Oh Rosetta, you're the one,
You make space-time lots of fun,
Oh Rosetta, I'm awfully fond of yoooou . . .
Rosetta, joy of joys,
When you orbit comets, I make noise!
Rosetta, you're science's best friend it's true!
Oh Rosetta, you're the one,
You make space-time lots of fun,
Oh Rosetta, I'm awfully fond of yoooou . . .

Jens
2014-Aug-04, 07:49 AM
More amazing pictures from Rosetta. Check it out. I am certain I can make out an eye on the head. See if you can spot it.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2014/08/02/rosetta_pic_of_comet_from_1000_km.html

Well, I can clearly see the face of Jesus in that picture. Looking upward, basically the lump sticking out at about 2 o'clock.

NEOWatcher
2014-Aug-04, 12:37 PM
Encomenate?
Does that mean make it smaller with a larger background?

Squink
2014-Aug-04, 02:30 PM
Universe Today, yesterday: Rosetta Orbiter less than 500 Kilometers from Comet 67P Following Penultimate Trajectory Burn (http://www.universetoday.com/113654/rosetta-orbiter-less-than-500-kilometers-from-comet-67p-following-penultimate-trajectory-burn/)

tusenfem
2014-Aug-04, 04:15 PM
... Unreal, yet nobody is quite ready to start tamping new terms into the gravitational equations. (Rosetta will be hanging around for long enough - about a year - to highly constrain a second-order term that is tied to orbital distance from large bodies.) This is already very interesting, and it could get better.


Because no tampering is necessary, keep your ATM ideas in ATM.

selvaarchi
2014-Aug-05, 06:16 AM
From a duck it has transformed to a mushroom, At least in my eyes.

http://www.universetoday.com/113676/rosetta-probe-swoops-closer-to-comet-destination-than-iss-is-to-earth-and-reveals-exquisite-views/


Europe’s Rosetta comet hunter achieved another milestone today, Aug 4, swooping in closer to its long sought destination than the International Space Station (ISS) is to Earth – and its revealing the most exquisitely sharp and detailed view yet of the never before visited icy wanderer soaring half a billion kilometers from the Sun.

The absolutely delightful photo above is the latest navcam taken of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by Rosetta’s navcam camera on Aug. 3 from a distance of 300 kilometers and shows rocks, gravel and tiny crater like features on its craggily surface of smooth and rough terrain.

Rosetta will make history as Earth’s first probe ever to rendezvous with and enter orbit around a comet.

molesworth
2014-Aug-06, 12:57 PM
Orbit achieved!! http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28659783

Some nice pics, getting up close and personal - http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Highlights/Postcards_from_Rosetta

Lots more interesting stuff to come in the next few months I'm sure :)

selvaarchi
2014-Aug-06, 01:00 PM
well done ESA :clap::rimshot:

galacsi
2014-Aug-06, 01:11 PM
And thanks for the pics ! They don't keep them to themself as was saying the rumor !

NEOWatcher
2014-Aug-06, 02:46 PM
Nice pictures.

Does this mean it's not all spikey with massive gas jets erupting gas and material like in Armageddon or Deep Impact? I'm shocked. ;)

KaiYeves
2014-Aug-06, 03:09 PM
Yay!

Squink
2014-Aug-06, 04:31 PM
Does this mean it's not all spikey with massive gas jets erupting gas and material like in Armageddon or Deep Impact? I'm shocked. ;)Got some pits in it that kind of look a little like those holes in the Russian tundra (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?152345-Big-Crater-in-Siberia-s-Yamal-Penninsula).

Swift
2014-Aug-06, 05:00 PM
May I suggest, now that we are no longer "on the way" that we post in the newly created "Rosetta is There!" thread (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?152712-Rosetta-is-There!&p=2232172#post2232172).