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trinitree88
2010-Jan-30, 06:31 PM
Sometimes we are reminded as Earthlings that the eventual expansion of the sun into a red giant star, well beyond the present orbit of the Earth, will boil our oceans, melt our land masses, and atomize/ionize our very ephemeral flesh, eventually cooling and coalescing into dust and a white dwarf. But what of newly formed supernova dust? How does that go? These guys...Silvia, Smith, and Schull... think it will follow a chain of sputtering with collisions leaving mostly iron. I like that. More later...SEE:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010arXiv1001.4793S

George
2010-Jan-30, 11:51 PM
Sometimes we are reminded as Earthlings that the eventual expansion of the sun into a red giant star, well beyond the present orbit of the Earth, will boil our oceans, melt our land masses, and atomize/ionize our very ephemeral flesh, eventually cooling and coalescing into dust and a white dwarf. But what of newly formed supernova dust? How does that go? These guys...Silvia, Smith, and Schull... think it will follow a chain of sputtering with collisions leaving mostly iron. I like that. More later...SEE:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010arXiv1001.4793S
"Sputtering grains"? Is this a common use for this adjective or do these three favor words beginning with "S"? :)

Do they mention water molecules and their Spontaneous reforming ability? "In the beginning there was water" (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2006/pdf/1395.pdf) and perhaps in the end?

trinitree88
2010-Feb-02, 11:21 PM
"Sputtering grains"? Is this a common use for this adjective or do these three favor words beginning with "S"? :)

Do they mention water molecules and their Spontaneous reforming ability? "In the beginning there was water" (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2006/pdf/1395.pdf) and perhaps in the end?

Sufferin' succotash, sonny. Seems several serious senior citizens stopped spittin' and shortly started sputtering instead.:eek:

In a more serious vein, leaving iron behind in a supernova remnant would lead to tiny emitters that radiate pretty much blackbody, and with iron's ability to orient whisker-like grains in a magnetic field, a polarized signal oriented to a nearby star's solar system. Pretty cool, considering that we are residing, at last count, within an irregular debris cloud consisting of ~ 6 successive supernovae remnants from the Centaurus-Sco association over the last few million years. Odds are that a few of them dusted the Local Bubble with iron, such as that found in marine sediments as Fe-60 by Brian Fields et al. This is all stuff from ArXiv and peer-reviewed Journals, with standard physical applications. It will be very interesting to see if the next generation of telescopic data archives can tease out exactly how symmetrical the last bubble out still is, or if they can even see it at all. pete