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View Full Version : I've Never Seen A Per Capita Crime Stat Like This Before!



BigDon
2010-Feb-01, 08:52 PM
The article is about property crime near universities and the "Winner", UC Santa Barbera, has a burglary rate of 1,019 burglaries per 1000 residence.

Twice the second place candidate.

http://www.walletpop.com/insurance/article/15-worst-college-crime-areas/875986

Uh, I think somebody needs to look at that.

Swift
2010-Feb-01, 08:56 PM
So basically, everyone has a burglary, and 19 poor souls get robbed twice. :eek:

Tog
2010-Feb-01, 09:02 PM
Not burglaries exactly, property crimes.

For this study of the top 15 college neighborhoods for property crime, property crimes included were the property crimes from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports: burglary (breaking and entering, including breaking into private homes), motor vehicle theft, and regular theft (larceny over $50). Based on multiple years of data, and predicted to the individual neighborhood level by NeighborhoodScout's exclusive crime models, we list the top 15 college neighborhoods where your risk of becoming a victim of a property crime is highest. The rating is based on the predicted number of property crimes in the neighborhood per 1,000 population of the neighborhood.

Still, that's a lot.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Feb-01, 09:15 PM
A lot of trusting and careless student types. It still sucks though.

rommel543
2010-Feb-01, 09:17 PM
What I'm seeing here is some guy who has a group of people not liking him gets his laptop stolen one day (gets reported), gets his text books stolen another day (gets reported), etc, etc, etc. Either that something like a frat house pranks stealing lawn ornaments.

I remember when I was a teen ager we had a "scavenger hunt" and some of the items to collect was a stone/concrete/metal lawn ornament (The more expensive the ornament the better the points), a tire from a vehicle with rim attached (the nicer the rim/tire the better the points awarded), a for sale sign (the cost about $150-$300), a street name sign (the closer to downtown the better the points), etc. You can see something like this adding up real quick. We then took all of the items collected and "positioned them artistically" on various city properties.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Feb-01, 09:25 PM
The first place I stayed at had a kitchen and there was a large freezer. One person found that someone had taken a whole chicken of theirs. We assumed it was someone who ran out of money and needed the food. We would of given him the food if they just asked. Other times I have had coke disappear during parties, they just assumed it was all for mix drinks. Some of the crime does come from people who get into a bad spot and are to proud to admit it.

tdvance
2010-Feb-01, 10:47 PM
Not burglaries exactly, property crimes.


Still, that's a lot.

Do they count charges or single activities? E.g., you break, enter, and steal 10 items, is that 12 crimes or 1?

Tog
2010-Feb-01, 11:55 PM
Should be just one. When we used to bust people for shoplifting, it didn't matter how many things they stole, it was just one charge.

What that charge ended up being was dependent on the total dollar amount stolen.

If someone breaks into the house, finds the car keys and steals the car, then unloads the valuables from the car, they would get one charge of burglary of a residence, auto theft, and vehicle burglary; which are three property crimes the way the article lists them.

Now, I was talking to a local police officer one night about something, and he said that part of the reason that federal charges take so much longer is that they charge for everything possible. If a person is a convicted felon, they are not allowed to possess a weapon, OR ammunition. If a guy had a gun with 10 rounds in it, he gets charged for the gun and 10 charges for possession of ammunition.

sarongsong
2010-Feb-02, 12:02 AM
My alma mater! However:
December 18, 2009
Although a database's statistics point to Isla Vista as the most dangerous neighborhood in the country for property crimes, the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department's own statistics came in well below what the study indicated...The list stated residents face a one-in-one chance of being the victims of property crime each year, but sheriff's department spokesman Drew Sugars said using common sense, that statistic seemed far fetched. With an estimated population of 18,000 and a one-in-one chance of being victimized, that adds up to 18,000 incidents, Mr. Sugars reasoned. However, compiling the department's reported cases of auto theft, larceny and burglary in 2005-07 -- the same crimes years used in the study -- the total came out to 1,500...
Santa Barbara News-Press (http://www.newspress.com/Top/Search/results.jsp)

Jens
2010-Feb-02, 03:41 AM
What I'm seeing here is some guy who has a group of people not liking him gets his laptop stolen one day (gets reported), gets his text books stolen another day (gets reported), etc, etc, etc. Either that something like a frat house pranks stealing lawn ornaments.


Just as a question: do students get an extension on homework if they report their laptop stolen? :shifty:

rommel543
2010-Feb-02, 06:33 PM
When I was in College it wasn't a valid excuse. In the student handbook there was a section regarding the use of laptops, backing up work, and storing all homework on the schools network. In short the school provided 500 mb per student (6 years ago this was a lot) of network storage specifically for backing up work to, thus eliminating the "It is/was on my laptop" argument. The storage was accessible from any computer hooked up to the network (password protected), and even had a web interface to access files.

Gillianren
2010-Feb-02, 07:44 PM
Ten years ago, I did most of my work in the school computer lab in the first place--I'm not sure any of my friends even owned laptops.

Fazor
2010-Feb-02, 07:58 PM
I was going to say that, at my school, you might be able to get a prof to feel sorry enough for you to give you a small extension on your work. But I'd imagine the default answer would have been "You should have backed up your work."

It looks like that's how it was for some of you others as well. I didn't have a laptop. Not one that I did work on, anyway. But I know that now, in the "real world", my bosses wouldn't accept that as an excuse. Why should a professor?

DonM435
2010-Feb-02, 08:10 PM
"I did back it up, but they stole all 1,018 copies!!! I'm gonna report!this!

rommel543
2010-Feb-02, 09:25 PM
Ten years ago, I did most of my work in the school computer lab in the first place--I'm not sure any of my friends even owned laptops.

I guess that was one of the perks to being in a computer programing course, school provided laptops.

tdvance
2010-Feb-02, 09:44 PM
Just as a question: do students get an extension on homework if they report their laptop stolen? :shifty:

I would guess that's a "per professor" kind of thing. I was always having to make such types of judgment when I was a teaching assistant.

Gillianren
2010-Feb-02, 10:12 PM
I guess that was one of the perks to being in a computer programing course, school provided laptops.

Yeah, I went to a really cheap public college.