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Jens
2010-Feb-04, 06:47 AM
Something's bugging me, and I hope somebody can help.

I think it's correct to say, "He is interested in the problem for several reasons."

OK, what if I want to start the sentence with "There are"? I'm confused whether it should be:

There are several reasons why he is interested in the problem.
There are several reasons that he is interested in the problem.
There are several reasons for which he is interested in the problem.

Any thoughts? Actually, none of them appear really wrong to me. Is there a best one?

Gillianren
2010-Feb-04, 07:11 AM
Technically, "reasons why" is wrong. I never did learn the reason why.

Were I to ignore the inclination to use it anyway, I'd go with "reasons that" or just "reasons."

HenrikOlsen
2010-Feb-04, 07:12 AM
The first one sounds best for me, the other two looks wrong, but I can't say exactly why.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Feb-04, 07:14 AM
Would "There are several reasons for him being interested in the problem." be better?

Jens
2010-Feb-04, 07:59 AM
Technically, "reasons why" is wrong. I never did learn the reason why.


I think I've heard that before, and I think I know the reason why, but I'm not sure I agree. I think people say that technically speaking, "why" is already part of "reason". You can say "the reason is. . ." so "the reason why is. . ." is redundant. It's like saying "the place where he is." Because "where he is" already means "the place he is." But I'm not really sure that redundancy of that kind of all that bad. In any case, "the reason why" is very, very common, and people don't seem to say it's wrong.

Strange
2010-Feb-04, 08:04 AM
I have never heard any rule or other objection to "reason why"; sounds perfectly OK to me.

Argos
2010-Feb-04, 12:19 PM
Were I to ignore the inclination to use it anyway, I'd go with "reasons that" or just "reasons."

Bold mine.

Itīs funny. It seems the least correct to me. But who am I to argue with you...

kleindoofy
2010-Feb-04, 01:42 PM
The version with "why" is what is called an indirect question. Proper indirect questions can be turned around into direct questions:

"I don't know why he went home" --> "Why did he go home? I don't know."

Our case uses the indirect question, but not properly.

"Why he is interested in the problem? There are several reasons."

That doesn't sound right.

Reasons are "for" and not "why."


Would "There are several reasons for him being interested in the problem." be better?
This is the best version, or with ACI: "There are several reasons for him to be interested in the problem."

However, without reflection I probably would have used the "why" version too.

Jeff Root
2010-Feb-04, 01:52 PM
Objection to "the reason why" is similar to but perhaps not as strong as
objection to "the reason is because".

Gillian's suggestion is simplest and works for me: There are several reasons he
is interested in the problem. Better: There are several reasons for his interest
in the problem.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Fazor
2010-Feb-04, 05:18 PM
"Several reasons exist that have given rise to his interest in the problem."

. . . I was trying to stretch that out much longer without adding any new information, but alas, I failed. :(

sabianq
2010-Feb-04, 07:09 PM
you could also word it..

"his interest in the problem is multi-lateral"

"multiple reasons constitute his interest in the problem"

"his interest in the problem is derived from many factors"

"the numerous aspects of the problem (or issue) are what piqued his interest"

"multitudinous rationales engendered his engagement in the topic"

sabianq
2010-Feb-04, 07:17 PM
"There are several reasons for him being interested in the problem." Would be better?



yes, and to further refine, the statment would be more formal

"There are several reasons for [proper name like Bob's] interest in the problem."

as for the original question...
"There are several reasons for which he is interested in the problem."
is the most formal of the three..

Fiery Phoenix
2010-Feb-04, 08:33 PM
There are several reasons he is interested in the problem.

I'd say it that way, though I realize it might not be too formal.

Argos
2010-Feb-04, 08:53 PM
There are several whys.

chrissy
2010-Feb-04, 08:59 PM
Jens all three are grammatically correct, I am just wondering if you are listing the reasons why he is interested in the problem?

mugaliens
2010-Feb-06, 09:18 AM
Something's bugging me, and I hope somebody can help.

I think it's correct to say, "He is interested in the problem for several reasons."

This is a grammatically correct! It is considered by some, however, to be awkward.


OK, what if I want to start the sentence with "There are"? I'm confused whether it should be:

There are several reasons why he is interested in the problem.
There are several reasons that he is interested in the problem.
There are several reasons for which he is interested in the problem.

Any thoughts? Actually, none of them appear really wrong to me. Is there a best one?

While it is also grammatically correct to begin a sentence with "There are," it's considered to be "inappropriate."

If I, as an editor, were to rewrite your original sentence, it would read:

Original: "He is interested in the problem for several reasons."

Rewrite: "Several reasons make him interested in the problem."

However, that's without knowing the context of this statement, which dramatically influence the wording of this particular sentence.

More?

J Riff
2010-Feb-06, 09:44 AM
It's awkward because it starts with 'there are' .
" He is interested in the problem for several reasons." ... puts things back in order of importance, somewhat. It depends on the previous sentence as well as the next one.
Your sentence is set up to describe the 'several reasons ' in the next sentence. Not him, not the problem.
There are several reasons for his interest in the problem. One of them is A: - Whoa. One of what ? The problems ? Or his interests ? Oh, his reasons, hidden way back at the beginning of the previous sentence.
Ease of reading takes precedence, I say scrap the whole sentence. There's plenty more where it came from.

Moose
2010-Feb-06, 11:55 AM
You can say "the reason is. . ." so "the reason why is. . ." is redundant.

Without digging out my handbook, I think you're right. The issue would be redundancy. "There are several reasons he is interested in the problem" would be more correct than any of the options presented.

I suspect the reason "reason why is" sounds right is that we're used to hearing "Why is?"

hhEb09'1
2010-Feb-06, 12:46 PM
Would "There are several reasons for him being interested in the problem." be better?I'm going out on a limb here because I cannot find justification on the internet for what I'm about to say, but I think that that is wrong, for a different reason. "Him" is not the object of "for" there, the sentence is not communicating that there are several reasons for him, instead "he being interested" has several reasons. So, I would say it should read "There are several reasons for he being interested in the problem."

Maybe.

Moose
2010-Feb-06, 12:57 PM
I'm going out on a limb here because I cannot find justification on the internet for what I'm about to say, but I think that that is wrong, for a different reason. "Him" is not the object of "for" there, the sentence is not communicating that there are several reasons for him, instead "he being interested" has several reasons. So, I would say it should read "There are several reasons for he being interested in the problem."

Maybe.

It's awkward either way you look at it, but the possessive form is less incorrect.

"There are several reasons for his being interested in the problem."

The reason is that "for his being interested in the problem" is mechanically identical to "for his interest in the problem".

hhEb09'1
2010-Feb-06, 01:05 PM
Gillianren, today on the Dating Game, you have three eligible bachelors: He, Him, and His. You are to choose one of them. Do you have any questions for them?

Gillianren
2010-Feb-06, 08:17 PM
"For his interest" is correct. The interest belongs to him. For "his being interested" is also corrected. The being interested belongs to him. The first, though, is shorter, and therefore it is the one I would use.