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Maksutov
2004-Mar-02, 11:15 PM
Talk about a long mission! 10 years to get to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko! Here's (http://www.esa.int/export/esaMI/Rosetta/index.html)more information on the mission.

Good to see the Ariane 5 finally settling down and performing at nominal!

Manchurian Taikonaut
2004-Jun-01, 11:03 AM
Here's some more information

Mission update


http://www.esrin.esa.it/export/esaMI/Rosetta/SEMROH374OD_0.html

http://www.esrin.esa.it/export/esaMI/Rosetta/SEMONIHHZTD_0.html






observation of Comet Linear, was a first positive test for Rosetta's ultimate goal







http://www.esrin.esa.it/export/esaMI/Rosetta/SEMOX5474OD_0.html

http://www.esrin.esa.it/export/esaMI/Rosetta/SEMTY5474OD_0.html


:D

milli360
2004-Jun-01, 11:24 AM
Talk about a long mission! 10 years to get to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko!
As opposed to forty for Gravity Probe B? :)

Manchurian Taikonaut
2004-Jun-15, 10:13 PM
some more informations

:D

The Cruise 1 Phase formally started on 7 June 2004 and will last until the start of the second and last commissioning slot in September/October 2004.

At the end of the last New Norcia pass in the reporting period (DOY 163, 01:40) Rosetta was at 49 million km from the Earth. The one-way signal travel time was 2 minutes 44 seconds.



Try this website

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/

it has a great flash animation so you can examine the planet, rosseta craft and comet

ToSeek
2004-Aug-04, 05:04 PM
Rosetta looks back at Earth (http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid= 1114&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0)

ToSeek
2004-Aug-19, 07:59 PM
Cooking on a comet...? (http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=14850)


One of the ingenious instruments on board Rosetta is designed to 'smell' the comet for different substances, analysing samples that have been 'cooked' in a set of miniature ovens.

Grand Vizier
2004-Aug-19, 08:08 PM
Cooking on a comet...? (http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=14850)


One of the ingenious instruments on board Rosetta is designed to 'smell' the comet for different substances, analysing samples that have been 'cooked' in a set of miniature ovens.

Baked Alaska, yum. (Hold the dust, tar and cyanide compounds, please...)

ToSeek
2004-Sep-24, 05:10 PM
Positive Charge for Rosetta (http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid= 1214&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0)


Detecting ions, or charged particles from either solar wind or comet tails, is one goal for the comet-chasing space probe, Rosetta. The instrument to register these charges has passed its in-flight test and seems ready for the next decade of landing on a comet.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Feb-23, 04:02 PM
Positive Charge for Rosetta (http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid= 1214&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0)


Detecting ions, or charged particles from either solar wind or comet tails, is one goal for the comet-chasing space probe, Rosetta. The instrument to register these charges has passed its in-flight test and seems ready for the next decade of landing on a comet.

23 February 2005
ESA's comet-chaser Rosetta will make a fly-by of planet Earth on 4 March 2005, and sky watchers should be able to see it with telescopes or binoculars if the sky is clear! Read on for details of ESA's 'Rosetta Up Close' photo contest.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMMTBYEM4E_index_0.html

:)

This fly-by manoeuvre will swing the three-tonne Rosetta spacecraft around our planet and out towards Mars

ngc3314
2005-Mar-01, 02:32 PM
23 February 2005
ESA's comet-chaser Rosetta will make a fly-by of planet Earth on 4 March 2005, and sky watchers should be able to see it with telescopes or binoculars if the sky is clear! Read on for details of ESA's 'Rosetta Up Close' photo contest.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMMTBYEM4E_index_0.html

:)

This fly-by manoeuvre will swing the three-tonne Rosetta spacecraft around our planet and out towards Mars


ESA now has details of the imaging contest announced - there is a copy linked from NASAWatch at http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=16246. I am among those not eligible, but will still try a shot from campus before dawn on the 4th. One thing that some of the secondary press coverage misses is that closest approach happens over the day side of the planet, so that even though it's closest to Mexico, the Americas don't get a useful view right around then - in fact, looking at JPL's Horizons ephemeris site, viewers in North America lose it for over 36 hours around that time. The Canary Islands might have the best view, now that I think of it.

Launch window
2005-Mar-01, 05:48 PM
take a snapshot as it does a fly-by of Earth
it would make a nice photo 8)

apollo18
2005-Mar-02, 01:03 AM
hm. looks like it doesn't get above a couple of degrees above the horizon, and that not until just before dawn. that's here in washington state, us. too bad; i'm having a little star party that night.

oh, well, we should be able to get some nice views of saturn and jupiter anyway...

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Mar-02, 02:38 PM
it's there in the sky, people have been taking photos since the 28th of Feb
http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2005/02mar05/hugentobler.gif
Swiss skywatcher's photo of Rosetta
photo contest - Contest Prize : 1st Place is 2 VIP tickets to attend Venus Express launch event at the Operations centre in Darmstadt Germany

ngc3314
2005-Mar-04, 05:33 AM
it's there in the sky, people have been taking photos since the 28th of Feb
http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2005/02mar05/hugentobler.gif
Swiss skywatcher's photo of Rosetta
photo contest - Contest Prize : 1st Place is 2 VIP tickets to attend Venus Express launch event at the Operations centre in Darmstadt Germany

As of 0520 UT on March 4, I just saw Rosetta with our campus 0.4m telescope from pretty light-polluted skies. Very crudely I'd say about magnitude 11, motion made the ID clear within about 5 minutes (since its motion is still almost radial to us). Alas, SBIG is still awaiting chips to send our nice big CCD imager. But anyway, this should encourage folks to go out and have a look even this far before closest encounter!

kucharek
2005-Mar-07, 07:07 AM
Images: http://www.rssd.esa.int/SB/ROSETTA/include/Images.html

ToSeek
2005-Mar-07, 05:21 PM
Rosetta views the Moon (http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=15674)

ToSeek
2005-Mar-07, 05:23 PM
Rosetta performs flyby (http://www.spacedaily.com/news/rosetta-05a.html)


The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft last Friday performed ESA's closest-ever Earth fly-by, gaining an essential gravity boost in its ten-year, 7.1 billion kilometre flight to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

At closest approach, at 22:09:14 GMT, Rosetta passed above the Pacific Ocean just west of Mexico at an altitude of 1954.74 km and a velocity relative to the Earth of 38 000 kph.

N C More
2005-Mar-07, 06:42 PM
Here's (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/ESAGJF7708D_0.html) where Rosetta is heading...Comet 67P/Churyumov- Gerasimenko.

kucharek
2005-Mar-08, 10:00 AM
Rosetta looks back: http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMV5LD3M5E_FeatureWeek_0.html

kucharek
2005-Mar-09, 01:45 PM
Rosetta captures moonrise: http://www.esa.int/export/esaCP/SEMUHOD3M5E_Expanding_0.html

ngc3314
2005-Mar-09, 02:23 PM
Rosetta captures moonrise: http://www.esa.int/export/esaCP/SEMUHOD3M5E_Expanding_0.html

This is sort of cool - after I had a peek at Rosetta only hours earlier, it looked back. I was under one of the southwestern cloud bands in that shot of the southern Appalachians (which basically covers northern and central Alabama). In fact, for this part of the country, that may be the most topographically clear satellite picture I've seen.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Mar-09, 07:43 PM
great data and images 8)

kucharek
2005-Apr-18, 04:50 PM
And the winner of the Rosetta fly-by close-up photo contest is...

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMKI9W797E_FeatureWeek_0.html

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Sep-20, 05:15 PM
+ ROSETTA: SOLAR FLARE INTERACTS WITH SPACECRAFT

The reporting period covers three weeks of passive cruise

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=37921

antoniseb
2005-Sep-20, 05:33 PM
+ ROSETTA: SOLAR FLARE INTERACTS WITH SPACECRAFT

It sounds like nothing was damaged. That's good news.

Launch window
2005-Nov-25, 11:23 AM
This is sort of cool - after I had a peek at Rosetta only hours earlier, it looked back. I was under one of the southwestern cloud bands in that shot of the southern Appalachians (which basically covers northern and central Alabama). In fact, for this part of the country, that may be the most topographically clear satellite picture I've seen.


nice picture!

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=38322
Ongoing Monitoring in Cruise Mode

23 Nov 2005 13:02
Report for Period 28 October to 18 November 2005

The reporting period covers three weeks of passive cruise, for monitoring and minor maintenance activities.

Launch window
2006-Jan-22, 12:20 PM
Passive Cruise
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=38558
09 Jan 2006 14:33
Report for Period 9 December 2005 - 6 January 2006

a bit of info on the mission
http://www.skyrocket.de/space/index_frame.htm?http://www.skyrocket.de/space/doc_sdat/rosetta.htm
Rosetta

publiusr
2006-Jan-25, 09:57 PM
Thanks for the links. I saw the Catching the Comet special and they had good images of the craft.

Launch window
2006-Feb-26, 11:14 PM
Thanks for the links. I saw the Catching the Comet special and they had good images of the craft.

darn, I missed that one


Here's more on Rosetta
Spacecraft Maintenance
20 Feb 2006 13:51
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=38825
Report for Period 27 January - 17 February 2006
The reporting period covers three weeks of passive cruise, during which important maintenance activities and a test with the RPC instrument were carried out

Manchurian Taikonaut
2006-Jun-12, 03:40 PM
Rosetta Enters Near Sun Hibernation Mode
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=39332
Report for Period 12 May - 2 June 2006

ESA’s new camera follows disintegration of a comet
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMN1C9ATME_1.html

Launch window
2006-Aug-24, 10:06 PM
Formal Start of Mars Swingby Phase
21 Aug 2006 08:51
Report for Period 28 July to 18 August 2006
The reporting period covers three weeks of active cruise for the Rosetta spacecraft. During this period, telemetry generated during Passive Cruise period was dumped to ground, and some maintenance activities were performed on on-board control procedures (OBCP) and mass memory files.
report (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=39857)
The instruments remained off during the reporting period, except for SREM which was kept active in the background for the entire period.

publiusr
2006-Aug-24, 10:43 PM
If that had been launched by Ares, they would have been there by now.

Launch window
2006-Aug-28, 08:35 PM
But right now Ares is just an expensive power-point show and Shuttle no longer lauches payloads like Galileo or Compton anymore, Ariane-5 was the biggest rocket they could use - plus it's a whole lot more cheaper than an STS flight.

antoniseb
2006-Oct-10, 02:18 PM
Formal Start of Mars Swingby Phase

The actual swingby is on February 25th, 2007. I'm looking forward to it in a mild way. I'm very interested in Rosetta. I'm interested in seeing some mission use Mars (instead of Jupiter, Venus, or Earth) as the slingshot planet. I'm curious to see what kind of images Rosetta can get of Mars. Mars itself is getting some pretty good coverage lately, what with MRO, Mars Express, and the MERs. I don't expect too many secrets of Mars to be revealed by Rosetta.

Kullat Nunu
2006-Oct-10, 02:35 PM
I wonder if Rosetta has any chance to image the Martian moons? It's hard to image them from the orbit (especially Deimos) so it could be good to have additional images of them.

ToSeek
2006-Oct-11, 02:27 PM
The actual swingby is on February 25th, 2007. I'm looking forward to it in a mild way. I'm very interested in Rosetta. I'm interested in seeing some mission use Mars (instead of Jupiter, Venus, or Earth) as the slingshot planet.

Dawn. (http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/timeline.asp)

Launch window
2007-Jan-21, 09:17 AM
Report for Period 30 December 2006 to 12 January 2007
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=40526

ToSeek
2007-Jan-30, 07:27 PM
Report for Period 13 January to 26 January 2007 (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=40588)


All activities have been conducted according to the plan without any major problem. The navigation campaign for the Mars swing-by is proceeding according to the plan with radiometric data acquired by ESA (NNO: New Norcia) and DSN stations.

yaohua2000
2007-Feb-03, 04:27 PM
Rosetta will be soon exactly 10,000,000 miles away from Mars at 2007-Feb-04 05:26:33 UTC, and going almost directly toward Mars with a speed of 20560 mph.

Launch window
2007-Feb-16, 09:32 AM
ESA spacecraft nears its Mars 'swingby'
http://www.sciencedaily.com/upi/index.php?feed=Science&article=UPI-1-20070215-14523200-bc-europe-esa-rosetta.xml

One Skunk Todd
2007-Feb-16, 04:25 PM
I hope they got their units right.

Launch window
2007-Feb-19, 04:51 PM
Countdown To Rosetta's Mars Swing-by

Sunday February 25, 2007 01:58:02 UTC
http://spaceurope.blogspot.com/2007/02/esas-rosetta-update.html
5
days
9
hours
15
minutes
46
seconds

01101001
2007-Feb-20, 08:56 PM
Emily Lakdawalla, Planetary Society Blog: Rosetta Update (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00000866/)


It will take me a couple more days to wrap my head around what all the acronyms and abbreviations mean, but I will shortly have a science timeline for the Rosetta Mars flyby ready for your enjoyment[...]

The Planetary Society is sending Doug Ellison, host of unmannedspaceflight.com, to Darmstadt, Germany, for the flyby. Doug will be reporting in this space beginning on Saturday, the 24th, giving you frequent updates on the status of the spacecraft, and keeping you posted with images and news as they become available.
[...]
For reasons of spacecraft health, it is only allowed to spend about four hours doing science [B]before Mars closest approach, so that will begin on February 24 at 18:00 UTC (10:00 PST) and continue until 22:10, when Rosetta has to shut its science instruments down for the perilous passage through Mars' shadow. Closest approach will happen on February 25 at 01:54 (Feb 24 at 17:54 PST).

Launch window
2007-Feb-23, 03:52 PM
From Ellison's unmannedspaceflight
Animated GIF
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=9434



http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=3946
02:00 - Doors open & Filming opportunity in Mission Control Room
02:40 - Welcome by David Southwood, ESA Director of Science Programme
02:50 - Rosetta Mars swingby the manoeuvres and flight dynamics, Uwe Feucht, Head of Flight Dynamics Division/Team
03:00 - En route science, first images, Gerhard Schwehm, Head of Solar System Science Operations Division & Rosetta Mission Manager
03:10 - Introductory comments on approach ; Paolo Ferri, Head of Solar and Planetary Missions Division and Rosetta Flight Operations Director Comments on eclipse, Andrea Accomazzo, Rosetta Spacecraft Operations Manager Comments on closest approach/eclipse, Andrea Accomazzo & Paolo Ferri
03:15 - Closest approach to Mars, eclipse starts
03:17 - Ground stations, Manfred Lugert, Head of Ground Facilities Operations Division
03:28 - Occultation ends - signal back
03:30 - Imagery from Rosetta and Mars Express , Uwe Keller, Mas-Planck Institute
03:40 - Comments on eclipse end and telemetry acquisition, Andrea Accomazzo,
03:52 - Conclusions, Manfred Warhaut, Head of Mission Operations Department
04 :00 - End of event

Kullat Nunu
2007-Feb-24, 11:16 PM
First navcam image (http://www.esa.int/esaMI/Rosetta/SEMM15CE8YE_0.html) of Mars released.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Feb-25, 10:04 AM
Rosetta successfully swings-by Mars – next target: Earth (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMWZ5CE8YE_0.html)
Beautiful new images from Rosetta’s approach to Mars (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMUDT70LYE_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/mars_osiris_rosetta_L.jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMWZ5CE8YE_1.html)

Kullat Nunu
2007-Feb-25, 03:09 PM
Stunning view of Rosetta skimming past Mars (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMFTZM0LYE_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/mars_philae_L.jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMFTZM0LYE_0.html)

Lord Jubjub
2007-Feb-25, 03:34 PM
So now we wait until this November.

Launch window
2007-Feb-25, 09:34 PM
Stunning pictures !

Yes in November 2007 we have the Second Earth fly-by, finally in 2008 it will reach asteroid Steins but it won't be until 2014 that it sends the lander onto the comet.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Feb-25, 10:24 PM
Don't forget the asteroid 21 Laetitia flyby in 2010. At the time, it will be the largest asteroid visited, 100 km (Dawn will arrive at Vesta in 2011).

21 Laetitia will also be the first M-type asteroid (M meaning metallic) visited by a spacecraft. However, it looks like that it may be similar to C-type (carbonaceous, like 253 Mathilde) asteroids instead. In fact, the metallicity of M-type asteroids has been questioned for some time (but there are still metallic asteroids, however).

Lord Jubjub
2007-Feb-26, 12:07 AM
So we will have four deep space probes sending back data from 2011-2015:

2011-2012: Messenger in orbit around Mercury (Mercury data stream actually starts in 2008)
2011-2014: Dawn orbits Vesta and Ceres
2014-2015: Rosetta orbits 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (with data from two asteroids met in transit)
2015: New Horizons sweeps past Pluto

Definitely a busy half decade.

Lord Jubjub
2007-Feb-26, 12:11 AM
How long is Cassini expected to last? Not including the horde of objects studying Mars, I'm thinking we will have half a dozen or more deep space probes sending back data from 2011-2015.

Nicolas
2007-Feb-26, 01:05 PM
First navcam image (http://www.esa.int/esaMI/Rosetta/SEMM15CE8YE_0.html) of Mars released.

Is that phobos and deimos visible in the pic?

Cugel
2007-Feb-26, 01:14 PM
The primary mission of Cassini ends in july 2008. A first extension will last until august 2010. After that there is some fuel left for a second extension but no decision has been taken on that. So, it is unclear whether Cassini will be active in the 2011-2015 time frame.

ToSeek
2007-Feb-26, 10:19 PM
Lots of good coverage of the flyby from the Planetary Society blog:

http://planetary.org/blog/

djellison
2007-Feb-27, 09:14 PM
Had an utter blast down in ESOC - pity there was no net access for the press there, but via my mobile and Emily, at least I got the word out as close to realtime as I could via Emily :) Hope you enjoyed my half-awake 1500 word review of events posting on the Sunday afternoon :)

Doug

ToSeek
2007-Feb-27, 09:22 PM
Had an utter blast down in ESOC - pity there was no net access for the press there, but via my mobile and Emily, at least I got the word out as close to realtime as I could via Emily :) Hope you enjoyed my half-awake 1500 word review of events posting on the Sunday afternoon :)

Doug

I'm sure I speak for many of us when I say that I appreciate your efforts and am insanely jealous. ;)

Omicron Persei 8
2007-Feb-28, 05:10 AM
I'm sure I speak for many of us when I say that I appreciate your efforts and am insanely jealous. ;)

Yeah, I'd pay for my whole trip just to experience that. Planetary Society, are you listening? *hint hint*

djellison
2007-Feb-28, 08:30 AM
Offer to cover such an event for the journal of a society of some sort - get the journal editor to write a covering note and bingo, you're in.

Doug

Launch window
2007-Feb-28, 05:19 PM
Nice work djellison, I enjoy lurking at your site and looking at the great coverage your un-manned spaceflight gives Mars, Moon probes, space telescope et cetera
Did they give any hints to you about future space missions ?




Rosetta BA blogged
Video of Phobos transit
http://www.badastronomy.com/bablog/2007/02/27/phobos-transit-courtesy-rosetta/

djellison
2007-Feb-28, 09:11 PM
Well - they've recently agreed to fund the next major ESA mission, Bepi-Columbo - to Mercury, and to extensions for VEX and MEX.

Doug

Lord Jubjub
2007-Mar-01, 12:07 AM
Isn't Bepi-Columbo supposed to start sending back data on Mercury in 2015?

Launch window
2007-Oct-19, 02:58 PM
Rosetta's thrusters were fired yesterday at 19:06 CEST (17:06 UTC), in a planned, 42-second trajectory correction manoeuvre designed to 'fine tune' the comet-chasing spacecraft's approach to Earth.


http://www.spaceurope.blogspot.com/