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Fazor
2010-Feb-08, 01:15 AM
Just wondering what anyone else thinks about this half time show. I don't typically even watch them, but I like The Who, so I left it on. I'm not a fan of "televised stage music", I just don't think the music comes across well. But they're putting on a good enough show.

What really made me want to comment was that earlier I was reading some stuff about how they have a tendency to book these older acts for the Super Bowl, and how a lot of the young fans won't even know who they are. The Who. Stones. Tom Petty. Etc.

Well, that might be true. And these bands were certainly before my time. But being a fan of rock and roll, I at least know who they are. And I'd take a group of aging fathers of rock over Brittney or 'Soldja Boy' or whatever flavor of the month the "young'uns" are into any day. So keep those classics coming, Super Bowl, because very little of the bowl is worth watching as is. At least keep giving us some good musicians who have earned the right to play. ;)

kleindoofy
2010-Feb-08, 01:21 AM
The light show was good.

Since I saw the game without commercials, I got to see the band standing around, bored to death, waiting for the start signal. The guitarist was practicing his "spontaneous" movements.

Is that windmilling of his right arm supposed to be cool?

It looked pretty silly to me, but I guess it's some kind of ritual.

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-08, 01:30 AM
Is that windmilling of his right arm supposed to be cool?

It looked pretty silly to me, but I guess it's some kind of ritual.

:doh:

No, this deserves...

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sarongsong
2010-Feb-08, 01:31 AM
...I was reading some stuff about...a lot of the young fans won't even know who they are. The Who. Stones. Tom Petty...That writer might be surprised at what young fans are aware of, between having heard their parents' music at home and school assignments re "The 60's".

Chuck
2010-Feb-08, 01:41 AM
I don't see why they need music every year. Maybe next year, in Texas, Richard Dawkins could give a halftime lecture on evolution.

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-08, 01:51 AM
I don't see why they need music every year. Maybe next year, in Texas, Richard Dawkins could give a halftime lecture on evolution.

Wouldn't that be rather ironic considering the usual make-up of the superbowl audience ?

kleindoofy
2010-Feb-08, 01:59 AM
Well, they could make "atavistic tendencies" the main subject of the lecture and use the crowd and the players as examples. ;)

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-08, 02:23 AM
Well, they could make "atavistic tendencies" the main subject of the lecture and use the crowd and the players as examples. ;)

Oh to spend a single night in conversation with any other sentient animal that understands the term atavistic would be more than I could ever dream of. kleindoofy, you are, and always will be, my friend. :)

Donnie B.
2010-Feb-08, 02:56 AM
Pete Townsend's been doing the windmill thing for decades. It's not so much cool these days as obligatory.

korjik
2010-Feb-08, 03:00 AM
I want to know why they got a band to do covers of the theme music to the various CSI franchises.

:)

ToSeek
2010-Feb-08, 03:09 AM
That writer might be surprised at what young fans are aware of, between having heard their parents' music at home and school assignments re "The 60's".

I was at an event last fall where they were playing nothing but oldies, and the person enjoying them the most seemed to be a 20-something young lady.

Meanwhile, I can't think of The Who without remembering this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlXjIg4fH74

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-08, 03:11 AM
...
What really made me want to comment was that earlier I was reading some stuff about how they have a tendency to book these older acts for the Super Bowl, and how a lot of the young fans won't even know who they are. The Who. Stones. Tom Petty. Etc.
...

My daughters are 15 and they have liked "The Who" for at least two years. They were disappointed that Townshend didn't smash his guitar at the end, though. One of them is also very fond of Petty.

Nick

kleindoofy
2010-Feb-08, 03:22 AM
At least they didn't expose their nipples. ;)

Swift
2010-Feb-08, 03:43 AM
I'm not a huge The Who fan, but I liked them in their day. But I thought they sounded awful. They have not aged well. Tom Petty was ten times better.

SeanF
2010-Feb-08, 03:44 AM
Yes, the joke a couple of weeks ago was that it was too bad the Vikings got eliminated, as Brett Favre was the only player who was old enough to know who The Who were. :)

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-08, 04:02 AM
I'm not a huge The Who fan, but I liked them in their day. But I thought they sounded awful. They have not aged well. Tom Petty was ten times better.

They're 65 years old, which in rock star years is like 275 (cf. Keith Richards). It did sound like Daltry lost his upper range, (not a problem with Petty, admittedly :lol:) but OTOH, that's kind of normal for someone his age.

Nick

tony873004
2010-Feb-08, 04:46 AM
The younger generation knows about The Who and all other classic rock. I can tell by the t-shirts and the conversation at my university. And it seems every major market has at least two radio stations that mix classic rock with newer stuff.

I don't know what the average age of the spectators at the Big Game is, but the tickets are expensive, so it's probably not 22. I think that's why the NFL seems to prefer acts that have a few years (or decades) under their belts.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Feb-08, 04:53 AM
I was at an event last fall where they were playing nothing but oldies, and the person enjoying them the most seemed to be a 20-something young lady.

Meanwhile, I can't think of The Who without remembering this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlXjIg4fH74
They forgot the Guess Who. Also I know the doctor that was there Doctor Who.

J Riff
2010-Feb-08, 05:28 AM
The Who...of all things to run into in here...
Just played 'My Wife' last nite, written by J Entwhistle the bass player. Both times I saw the Who, 75ish, they opened with this number, it still rocks like crazy.
You guys need some rock history in here..that's not a criticism )..I remember the Who as practically the very first Rock band...not rock n roll...the 1st 4-piece rock band that was consciously geared for the huge stadium audiences we now take for granted. They were absolutely great live, a bit flat when recorded, although their earlier pop songs were quite in line with the 60s. ( I can see for miles, My generation etc)
Then Jimi appeared and the Who, almost overnite, became a lot heavier band. Pete started trying to actually play, maybe get a bit of controlled feedback instead of simply crunching his guitar into his amp and getting a lot of aggressive noise while Moon kicked his drum set to pieces.
Anger, yknow ? Pills. Mods vs. rockers. All very real and socially signifigant/

Tom Petty would laugh out loud if you put him in their league, the Who practically defined the genre. Sure, they were out to get rich and become famous, but there was nothing else like them before, and their live show blows away anything I've seen in recent years, including AC/DC, Metallica, or lots of other metallic rubbish people are subjected to via the unbelievably dishonest music business. Don't get me started.

The windmilling and other theatrics were simply a way to be seen by a huge stadium audience. I watched them from different seats, all over the arena, and one always felt part of the show, like they didn't need the lights and all the gadgets they use these days to, largely, cover a lack of talent.

I have run into Townshend indirectly a few times, through people he has helped out when he didn't have to. Another old soundman I know actually punched Pete when he was alcoholically out of control.
Should they still be out there trying to rock out ? Please god, let them outlast the Stones !

Celestial Mechanic
2010-Feb-08, 05:45 AM
{Snip!} They were disappointed that Townshend didn't smash his guitar at the end, though. {Snip!}
So was I. I was really expecting it. :(

How about having Fleetwood Mac next year? :clap:

sarongsong
2010-Feb-08, 06:03 AM
The juxtaposition of taking the audience from a raucous, brightly lit sporting event to an attentive, darkened rock concert, in a matter of minutes, was "a trip"... :)

Pete Townshend:
2006
...I think our situation is so eccentric. It isn’t just that we produced our hits so long ago, but that we stopped producing new music after only 17 years...The problem was that radio began to be controlled by advertising agencies, not program directors...Who songs—but only those on a limited list written by those who paid ad revenue...This made it hard not just to get new songs aired, but also to get feedback on how we were doing. The irony is that those few classic songs have now embedded themselves so deeply in the American consumer’s consciousness that they are almost used as hymns by filmmakers and advertisers...
relix.com (http://www.relix.com/features/2010/02/05/relix-celebrates-the-super-bowl-with-the-who)

slang
2010-Feb-08, 11:53 AM
At least the start of the performance was disappointing. Disappointing enough to call it a night (it was about 2 AM here @halftime).

AndreasJ
2010-Feb-08, 12:02 PM
My daughters are 15 and they have liked "The Who" for at least two years. They were disappointed that Townshend didn't smash his guitar at the end, though. One of them is also very fond of Petty.
I ran into (surfed into? 'twas online) a teenage girl who was creepily obsessed with Tom Petty a few months ago ...

Donnie B.
2010-Feb-08, 12:28 PM
Tom Petty played a great set last year, but he has outstanding musicians in his band so it's not surprising they sounded fine.

Daltry has definitely lost the upper range; so has Townshend for that matter. Pete also has significant hearing loss, I understand. Which is hardly surprising.

One thing that bothered me about The Who's performance was the shortened versions they played. It seemed as if they were trying to squeeze in an entire "greatest hits" album, with about thirty seconds of each song. At least they played most of Who Are You and We Won't Get Fooled Again.

Speaking of which, did anyone else find it creepy that the Super Bowl crowd piped up on the line "we won't get fooled again"? Yeah, those rich folks sure are rebels. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss -- oh, the irony.

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-08, 12:44 PM
...
One thing that bothered me about The Who's performance was the shortened versions they played. It seemed as if they were trying to squeeze in an entire "greatest hits" album, with about thirty seconds of each song. At least they played most of Who Are You and We Won't Get Fooled Again.
...

Later, I was wondering aloud: did they just play a CSI medley? Then my daughter reminded me that some of "Feel Me.." was in the mix.

Nick

Argos
2010-Feb-08, 12:46 PM
I was intending to see the Superbowl, but I fell asleep. Did Pete destroy his guitar? :)

tdvance
2010-Feb-08, 02:05 PM
Just wondering what anyone else thinks about this half time show.

Much better than many in the past, with boy bands, boob "slips", and all.

I think someone realized the half-time shows have been lame and decided to make this one better.

Doodler
2010-Feb-08, 02:45 PM
I thought they sounded fine, myself.

Live performances often feature a lot of sonic "warts" that studio recording masks in the editting booth and multiple takes.

As far as the nature of the performer, I think I'd have to agree somewhat with the idea that the age of the audience in the stadium has something to do with it, but I think it has more to do with playing it safe in the post-malfunction era. The audience in attendance may tend be older (though I would disagree, a lot of younger fans make the pilgrimage once in their lives, so they can save up for the tickets), the home viewing audience is where the big money is aimed at. A bad halftime costs viewership, especially with other networks offering their own halftime alternatives.

Fazor
2010-Feb-08, 02:49 PM
I'm not a huge The Who fan, but I liked them in their day. But I thought they sounded awful. They have not aged well. Tom Petty was ten times better.

I'd agree, but I like Tom Petty 10 times better to begin with, so I'm biased.

Delvo
2010-Feb-08, 03:03 PM
I had always heard of The Who and was familiar with some of their songs, but couldn't have connected the songs and the band to each other or recognized the members' faces or names. I first became familiar with Daltry through a character named "Fitzcairn" (usually just called "Fitz") on "Highlander: The Series", only later to find out that "the guy who plays Fitz used to be the lead singer of The Who". So to me, he's always primarily Fitzcairn, and a singer only secondarily.

Anyway, they seemed to lack vocal pitch control for the first fragment in their medley, the one about a deaf dumb & blind kid playing pinball. Fortunately, that ended quickly and they sang better for the others after that one.

ShadowSot
2010-Feb-08, 04:24 PM
I feel offense to the remark about.
Just because I'm 21, does not mean that I do not know what good music sounds like.
It's the new stuff really that's severely lacking...

Trantor
2010-Feb-08, 05:15 PM
I thought they were actually better than I expected last night. I saw one of their recent concerts on TV a few weeks ago, and thought that Roger Daltry sounded pretty horrible. His vocal cords just aren't what they used to be; and Pete Townsend's vocals weren't much better either.

I expected a pretty bad showing, but was pleasantly surprised by the outcome. Not great, but also not as bad as the concert I recently saw.

As far as Super Bowls go, my favorite half time show, was Paul McCartney a few years back.

Larry Jacks
2010-Feb-08, 05:23 PM
They're 65 years old, which in rock star years is like 275

I found it rather odd to hear such old musicians performing "Teenage Wasteland." It just sounded strange. I really didn't enjoy their performance very much and my wife absolutely hated it.

I do think they need to look for some younger acts for the halftime show. After the notorious malfunction years ago, they seem to have raided the Rock-n-Roll rest home to find safe acts.

Argos
2010-Feb-08, 05:25 PM
I do think they need to look for some younger acts for the halftime show.

Yeah. Young fellows like Peter Frampton. ;)

Fazor
2010-Feb-08, 05:26 PM
It doesn't bother me that they're old (keep in mind, I'm only 27). I didn't like the medley format of run-on-songs. Play one or two classic but complete songs.

I only watched because a) I like some of their songs, but more importantly b) was settled in on the couch with the laptop on my, well, lap, and didn't feel like making the effort to get up and find the remote.

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-08, 05:27 PM
They're 65 years old, which in rock star years is like 275

I found it rather odd to hear such old musicians performing "Teenage Wasteland."
...


"My Generation" perhaps would have been an odder choice. [nitpick: "Teenage Wasteland" is actually called "Baba O'Riley"]


...
I do think they need to look for some younger acts for the halftime show. After the notorious malfunction years ago, they seem to have raided the Rock-n-Roll rest home to find safe acts.

I think perhaps you're right in that they look for acts that "stick to the script" and they feel older performers may be more likely to do so.

Nick

captain swoop
2010-Feb-08, 08:03 PM
If you can find it watch the 'Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus'
Back in the 60s the Stones hired a circus for a few days and got their 'mates' round to play. It includes performances from Jethro Tull, Taj Mahal, Marianne Faithfull, The Who and of course the Stones themselves.

The Who perform 'A quick one while he's away'. it's amazing, full blown Rock and energy, it . Watch it and see why they were the best.
Actualy all the performances are great, the Stones do a bunch of songs including an amazing 'Sympathy For the Devil'. Jagger ripping off his T Shirt to reveal a painting of the Devil on his chest.
There is a 'scratch' band called the 'Dirty macs' composed of Kieth Richards on Bass, Clapton on Guitar, Ginger Baker on Drums and John lennon singing 'Yer Blues'

It would never get made today, too many managers and agents and egos involved.

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-08, 09:18 PM
If you can find it watch the 'Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus'
...

Is this it?

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5629459655051643497#


Nick

kleindoofy
2010-Feb-08, 09:21 PM
... Townshend didn't smash his guitar at the end ...
Ahh, yet another ritual which I gather is supposed to be "cool."

Probably very appealing to the Beavis and Butthead style mindset. ;)

Some things never cease to amaze me.

Fazor
2010-Feb-08, 09:32 PM
I've never liked the whole "smashing guitars" thing. Even less so now that I play. I love my guitars. Granted these guys could smash one and buy 10 more to replace it without batting and eye. But that just seems like a waste.

The "windmill" isn't my favorite move either . . . that said, with a band like The Who, it seems appropriate. Just like most of Elvis' moves would look stupid if anyone else did them, but in his shows, that was part of who he was.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Feb-08, 10:53 PM
Ahh, yet another ritual which I gather is supposed to be "cool."
At the time The Who did it, coolness wasn't the point though that is likely what drove their imitators.

slang
2010-Feb-08, 10:58 PM
Probably very appealing to the Beavis and Butthead style mindset. ;)

Beavis and Butthead weren't even born yet!

closetgeek
2010-Feb-08, 11:16 PM
It doesn't bother me that they're old (keep in mind, I'm only 27). I didn't like the medley format of run-on-songs. Play one or two classic but complete songs.

I only watched because a) I like some of their songs, but more importantly b) was settled in on the couch with the laptop on my, well, lap, and didn't feel like making the effort to get up and find the remote.

my bold
Which is why you are entirely too young to be talking like this:


Well, that might be true. And these bands were certainly before my time. But being a fan of rock and roll, I at least know who they are. And I'd take a group of aging fathers of rock over Brittney or 'Soldja Boy' or whatever flavor of the month the "young'uns" are into any day.

Again my bold.


The windmilling and other theatrics were simply a way to be seen by a huge stadium audience. I watched them from different seats, all over the arena, and one always felt part of the show, like they didn't need the lights and all the gadgets they use these days to, largely, cover a lack of talent.

My father was a big fan of The Who so I got to hear a lot of it, growing up. I pick and choose, there are some songs I like and some I don't. They can put on a good show without lightshows and gadgets but not all bands are using gadgets and such to cover their lack of talent. Sorry huge Pink Floyd fan and beg to differ on that one point. Even the more modern bands, however, don't use it to hide but rather to enhance the experience. To help catch a mood.

closetgeek
2010-Feb-08, 11:25 PM
Ahh, yet another ritual which I gather is supposed to be "cool."

Probably very appealing to the Beavis and Butthead style mindset. ;)

Some things never cease to amaze me.

Supposedly, the guitar-smashing began when he was playing on stage and accidentally broke his guitar, so he smashed it, grabbed another guitar, and continued playing. People thought it was part of the act so it became expected. As for the windmill, I think it's just to be dramatic, not necessarily about being "cool."

captain swoop
2010-Feb-08, 11:41 PM
Is this it?

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5629459655051643497#


Nick

Yes, that's it. It's the whole thing I see.

captain swoop
2010-Feb-08, 11:45 PM
If you want to know what 'The Who' came out of watch 'Quadrophenia'
It's set around the 'Mod' scene of the 60s.

aastrotech
2010-Feb-09, 01:20 AM
The Who for the Who Dats. Made sense to me. I guess if they really want to "cater to the 'usual' football fan" they would have gotten Ted Nugent.

NorthernBoy
2010-Feb-09, 01:33 AM
If you want to know what 'The Who' came out of watch 'Quadrophenia'
It's set around the 'Mod' scene of the 60s.

There still seem to be plenty of Mods doing the rounds, too. There'll still be outbreaks of Mod references spreading across facebook, and Brighton always has a selection of them hanging out in the summer.

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-09, 01:43 AM
Brighton always has a selection of them hanging out in the summer.

I was a biker when I was young, and to be honest I never really understood the mods, what they stood for or what they wanted. We loved bikes, big noisy bikes like the norton commando or the triumph bonnie. We made noise and looked like rebels. Mods were just annoying nerds that buzzed around on hair dryers. What was the point ?

J Riff
2010-Feb-09, 02:31 AM
I ... never mind. Forget all the other stories I was gonna launch into. This is a science board. As far as the Who, get Live at Leeds and crank it up. If you 'don't like it' then you don't like Rock music, aren't a rocker, never will be,
and should get your kicks calculating parallax (?) or grooving to lightweight 80s crossover pop acts like Tom Petty, who is very good, yes, and a fine fellow.

Furthermore - (rant terminated)

captain swoop
2010-Feb-09, 03:13 PM
Rockers weren't realy rebels, not as much as the 'Mods' Rockers to my mind listened to their dads music and rode their dads bikes. Mind you I have never been much of a fan of 'old' British Bikes from the 50s and 60s, they were mostly prewar relics dressed up, that's why the industry died. Modern 'Rock' which is the music of choice for most current 'Bikers' came from bands like The Who, Kinks and Small Faces, hey all started as 'Mod' bands. I would go as far as to say that modern Bikes owe as much to Scooters as they do to clonky old triumphs and Nortons. I don't get the Scooter thing either though. Scarborough and Whitby have regular 'Rallies' for Scooter Clubs and Mods it's very much a 'retro' fashion thing though.

Fazor
2010-Feb-09, 03:16 PM
my bold
Which is why you are entirely too young to be talking like this: . . .

Normally I'd agree. But over the past couple of years, there's been a few occasions where I had to attend high-school dances (homecomings, mostly) in order to help Tara (photographer). In the 10 years since I graduated highschool, highschool kids' taste in music has gone from bad to worse.

They're a whole new generation, musically speaking. Thus, they're young'uns and I"m old and wise enough to criticize their taste. ;)

Buttercup
2010-Feb-09, 03:36 PM
Rock 'n roll took a major nose-dive in 1988, from which it has yet to recover imo. There were some very interesting and innovative bands and sounds particularly from 1983 - 1987. The Joshua Tree by U2 was "the final hurrah" in my books.

With a few exceptional songs in the 1990s, forget it otherwise...(and that goes for Kurt Cobain too; he was "Gen-X's John Lennon"?? With all due respect to a deceased man, I seriously disagree). Hardly any '90s band could sustain popularity much beyond 1-hit wonders. And as for Alanis Morissette's nerve-jarring caterwauling, you can have that too. :hand:

Fazor
2010-Feb-09, 03:44 PM
With a few exceptional songs in the 1990s, forget it otherwise...(and that goes for Kurt Cobain too; he was "Gen-X's John Lennon"?? With all due respect to a deceased man, I seriously disagree). Hardly any '90s band could sustain popularity much beyond 1-hit wonders. And as for Alanis Morissette's nerve-jarring caterwauling, you can have that too. :hand:

Pearl Jam's still around today. So is Alice in Chains. Stone Temple Pilots were good. You mentioned Nirvana. I think Foo Fighters, and Dave Grohl in particular, are the best musicians of the decade. Soundgarden was pretty big, though I never much liked them, aside from a handful of agreeable songs. Can't forget Smashing Pumpkins.

Late 80's, and most of the 90's is my generation. Step off! Ha.

Argos
2010-Feb-09, 04:27 PM
Oasis gave the tone for the 90´s rock scene.

Fazor
2010-Feb-09, 04:29 PM
Oasis gave the tone for the 90´s rock scene.
I wouldn't say they set the tone, but they certainly helped shape it. There were a lot of important bands in the 90's. It's just a shame that none of today's bands seems to have learned from them . . . ;)

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-09, 04:35 PM
I'm an old(ish) fogey but there was a lot of 90s music I liked, and many of these groups are still active: They Might Be Giants, 10,000 Maniacs, The Lemonheads, R.E.M., ... we mentioned Tom Petty earlier, and he was still active in that decade, as was John Mellencamp.

Nick

Argos
2010-Feb-09, 04:37 PM
Red Hot Chili Peppers can´t be left out of any decent 90´s list.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Feb-09, 05:05 PM
And as for Alanis Morissette's nerve-jarring caterwauling, you can have that too. :hand:
The Yoko Ono of the 90's.

Buttercup
2010-Feb-09, 05:21 PM
Okay, I just recalled the soundtrack to "The Crow" and Nine Inch Nails, etc. That was good stuff. And yes, 10,000 Maniacs.

Trying to be fair here. :rolleyes:

But yeah I'm biased: There is no way the '90s can hold a candle to the '80s.

Fazor
2010-Feb-09, 05:26 PM
I don't consider NiN to be rock, though. I thought we were just talking about great rock bands.

I did love NiN though. I don't listen to his stuff much anymore, but 'The Fragile' didn't leave my car stereo my entire senior year.

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-09, 05:38 PM
...And yes, 10,000 Maniacs.
...

I have kind of an "aural crush" on Natalie Merchant. I would listen to her even if she sang the phonebook.

Nick

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-09, 05:41 PM
I ... never mind. Forget all the other stories I was gonna launch into. This is a science board...

Ok, then what about this (http://www.amazon.com/Here-Comes-Science-Might-Giants/dp/B002FKZ4UO)?

Nick

Luckmeister
2010-Feb-09, 06:10 PM
Ok, then what about this (http://www.amazon.com/Here-Comes-Science-Might-Giants/dp/B002FKZ4UO)?

Nick

Yeah, but for "Science" music, This (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IlHgbOWj4o) is still my favorite.

Parrothead
2010-Feb-09, 06:51 PM
Considering they are closing in on 70, still enjoyed the music, but the vocal range is gone.

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-09, 09:07 PM
Yeah, but for "Science" music, This (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IlHgbOWj4o) is still my favorite.

Well, OK, but the TMBG album is an actual bona fide science album for kids.

Nick

Luckmeister
2010-Feb-10, 02:26 AM
Well, OK, but the TMBG album is an actual bona fide science album for kids.

Nick

Ah yes, and that's definitely a good thing. :)

Tobin Dax
2010-Feb-10, 03:52 AM
I have kind of an "aural crush" on Natalie Merchant. I would listen to her even if she sang the phonebook.

Nick
Darn it, I'm playing Bach's Cello Suites on youtube right now, but I'm going to have to switch to Natalie Merchant. She has some good songs, both by herself and with 10,000 Maniacs.

mugaliens
2010-Feb-10, 09:53 AM
The Who was the first truly thunderous rock band out there.

J Riff
2010-Feb-10, 10:34 AM
Havent herd the Giants yet, the Dolby songs a goodun I'd forgotten. How about Jimi: Third Stone from the Sun. It was educational.

closetgeek
2010-Feb-10, 12:15 PM
Normally I'd agree. But over the past couple of years, there's been a few occasions where I had to attend high-school dances (homecomings, mostly) in order to help Tara (photographer). In the 10 years since I graduated highschool, highschool kids' taste in music has gone from bad to worse.

They're a whole new generation, musically speaking. Thus, they're young'uns and I"m old and wise enough to criticize their taste. ;)

I do agree, though my car radio is broken (stuck on 88.7) so I only listen to what I have on my ipod, in the car, so I in the past 6 months I haven't had the opportunity to hear anything new. There haven't been very many bands to come out in the past few years that I would even call noteworthy. It's just funny, because I've said the same thing, then realized I sounded too much like my grandfather :silenced:

captain swoop
2010-Feb-10, 09:00 PM
The Who were the first truly thunderous rock back out there.

Well, apart from the Kinks. Townsend was influenced in his songwriting by Ray and guitar style by Dave Davis.

More up to date Van Halen, Damon Albarn of Blur. Noel Gallagher of Oasis and paul Weller have all sites the Kinks as a big influence.

Argos
2010-Feb-10, 09:06 PM
Van Halen shows the Kinks influence by making a great rendition of "You Really Got Me".

slang
2010-Feb-10, 11:27 PM
Yeah, but for "Science" music, This (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IlHgbOWj4o) is still my favorite.

High on my list of vastly underrated musicians...

*adds The Golden Age of Wireless to the nightly playlist*

mugaliens
2010-Feb-11, 01:03 PM
The Kinks were heavy on the guitar. I saw them in concert in 1982, and never considered them "thunderous."

captain swoop
2010-Feb-11, 04:25 PM
That was the 'Give the People What they Want' tour. I saw them in Newcastle.

mugaliens
2010-Feb-11, 09:33 PM
Could have been the auditorium in which they played - it was a medium (10,000 seats) basketball colliseum. Acoustics can be very tricky.

sarongsong
2010-Feb-11, 09:43 PM
The Who was the first truly thunderous rock band out there.Hmmh---thunderous
thun·der·ous (thndr-s)
adj.
1. Producing thunder or a similar sound.
2. Loud and unrestrained in a way that suggests thunder

thefreedictionary.com (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thunderous)While The Who were indeed "loud and unrestrained", the band that most suggested "in a way that suggests thunder", to me, were the double-drummer powered Grateful Dead (http://www.audioheritage.org/images/jbl/photos/pro-speakers/thumbs/grateful_small.jpg), particularly in their extended solos.

blueshift
2010-Feb-12, 03:06 AM
My nephew Rob plays in a punk rock screaming, guitar and keyboard smashing group. He majored in philosophy at Easern Illinois and one of the guitar players majored in physics. The name of the group is Tub Ring and they have such song names as "The Fermi Paradox" and "Drake Equation" but hold your ears if you listen to any of it. Rob is the lead singer and keyboard player.

So I asked him one day what kind of music from the past inspired him to play like that? He said it was one classical musical score and he told me to watch the energy of the instruments while its being played and realize that those instruments are screaming at you. If one was to sing to it. one would have to scream.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkymTHSbWe0

J Riff
2010-Feb-19, 08:44 AM
I'm a working guitarist and yea the Kinks were truly influential but not 'thunderous' like the Who or Jimi. I used to stay awake under the covers waiting for 'You really got Me' to come on and it's an alltime great riff. Van Halen grabbed it cos' they didn't have quite enough material at first.
Blue Cheer and a raft of other 'garage' rockers like the Sonics were around too, but twas the Who who really cranked it up, especially after seeing what Jimi was doing.
But, who was the 1st truly heavy metal band ? Maybe Deep Purple. Again, they were really influenced by Hendrix. It's hard to understand the impact of Jimi in 67 if one wasn't there listening. Overnight, everybody turned up and began messing with feedback. We couldn't get those sounds ! Jimi Page in 69 was heavy too, and unless you ran thru an echoplex pre-amp it was tuff to get his tone. Blackmore plugged in through a 2-track tapedeck locked in record mode. This was all mysterious and often one couldn't figure out how they were getting their sounds. Lesley west of Mountain. James Gang w/ Joe Walsh. Sabbath.Johnny Winter, Duane Allman, Rory Gallagher..others I can't think of right now, but to me it was all over by about 1973 as hundreds of guys appeared, blasting away, each one louder than Woody Hermans Thundering Herd !

captain swoop
2010-Feb-19, 10:55 AM
I have an old Vox AC30, I play a Washburn A20 and a Processor when I am in a 'metal' mood or a Les Paul the rest of the time. I used to have various pedals but apart from a Corus I never use them much now, the processor can do everything I want from one box.

Fazor
2010-Feb-19, 03:29 PM
I have an old Vox AC30, I play a Washburn A20 and a Processor when I am in a 'metal' mood or a Les Paul the rest of the time. I used to have various pedals but apart from a Corus I never use them much now, the processor can do everything I want from one box.

I love my Washburns, though neither are particularly special. And X-series electric and a D10 Acoustic/Electric.

I go though phases though. Sometimes it's all my Wash elect. Then I'll go acoustic for a while. Then I'll "fall for" my Epi StudioDOT hollowbody.

Right now I've been playing a Jaguar knock-off I have. It's actually not a half bad little guitar. Could use new hardware though. Pickups are a bit weak.

captain swoop
2010-Feb-20, 05:19 PM
The A20 has a 'fast' almost triangle section neck and locking trem. It's a 'through' neck design with the body being two 'wings' attached either side. Makes it solid and has a good sustain.

Link to the washburn forum with pics of A20s.
http://forums.washburn.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=16059

mugaliens
2010-Feb-27, 01:41 AM
Hmmh---thunderousWhile The Who were indeed "loud and unrestrained", the band that most suggested "in a way that suggests thunder", to me, were the double-drummer powered Grateful Dead (http://www.audioheritage.org/images/jbl/photos/pro-speakers/thumbs/grateful_small.jpg), particularly in their extended solos.

Lol, not even. As the soundman for a band in college, a EE friend showed me how to tap into massive amounts of current by using a simple high-current voltage following circuit and rewiring our speakers in parallel.

It worked all too well - during the 2pm rehersals/sound check, we blew several windows, not to mention our net take for the evening.

That's when we changed our name to The Bruise. :lol: