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ToSeek
2002-Apr-12, 01:24 PM
New ISS transfer vehicle named for early sf writer (http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99992165)

The Curtmudgeon
2002-Apr-12, 02:00 PM
'Bout durn time, too! The trouble is that many English-language readers get the idea that Verne only wrote inaccurate science in his novels, but it's because the standard English translations have been butcher jobs. The Europeans have a much better concept of how accurate Verne usually was (although, of course, once it gets into speculation, as to what might happen in the future, all bets were off--still, generally JV can be relied on to do a very credible job extrapolating from the science of his day).

There were editions of The Annotated '20,000 Leagues Under the Sea' and The Annotated 'From the Earth to the Moon' back in the 70s, but they never did any more of them, which was a real pity. It was really amazing to read the hack job that the original translator had made out of what was not only excellent fiction, but excellent science as well.

The (okay, so I'm on a crusade to rehabilitate JV's reputation in the UK/US) Curtmudgeon

Firefox
2002-Apr-12, 02:20 PM
I didn't see anything in that article about whether the ATV could be used as a lifeboat should something happen on board. For the moment the crew is limited by the Soyuz's carrying capacity. Which reminds me, has any final decision been made on whether to completely nix the CRV program, or go with it after all?


-Adam

Roy Batty
2002-Apr-12, 02:53 PM
On 2002-04-12 10:00, The Curtmudgeon wrote:
There were editions of The Annotated '20,000 Leagues Under the Sea' and The Annotated 'From the Earth to the Moon' back in the 70s, but they never did any more of them, which was a real pity. It was really amazing to read the hack job that the original translator had made out of what was not only excellent fiction, but excellent science as well.


Its been a long time since ive read any JV, but wasnt it his 'Earth to the Moon' that went into why a 'bullet' shaped rocket was better than a spherical one they originally proposed? Definately good science /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

ToSeek
2002-Apr-12, 04:31 PM
As I recall, From the Earth to the Moon had the American voyagers taking off from Florida (Texas was considered but dismissed) and achieving an escape velocity of about 25,000 mph in a ship they dubbed the Columbiad. Also, one of the dogs on board dies, and they eject the body, which follows along with them.

Sounds pretty darn good to me.

The Curtmudgeon
2002-Apr-12, 07:14 PM
I didn't mean to imply that every single science fact in Verne's writing got scrubbed by the translator; only that a lot of the science was, leading to the impression by many (e.g., read some of Brian Aldiss' essays on sci-fi) that Verne was slipshod, at best, when "trying" to put real science in his fiction. A large part of the problem, according to the guy who edited the 'Annotated' versions, was that the original English translations were done at a time when the metric system was still pretty much ignored by English-speakers, even scientists, and so a lot of the mistakes were simple conversion errors, but they did produce some howlers. Also, Verne included a lot of social commentary in his fiction, and the original translator wasn't in step with his ideas and so either clipped them or skewed them to his own way of thinking, and that would occasionally lead to him omitting basic facts that were necessary to later, non-omitted, science discussions.

I'll try to remember to get on-line this weekend from home (I usually post from work, as now) where I've got my 'Annotated JVs' and post some examples of the problems and the corrected translations.

The (just how do you try to remember?) Curtmudgeon

ToSeek
2002-Apr-12, 07:25 PM
I have heard from other sources that most of the English translations of Verne are wretched.

Chuck
2002-Apr-12, 08:21 PM
Let's all learn French and meet back here in a year to discuss Verne's Off On A Comet.

Roy Batty
2002-Apr-12, 08:56 PM
On 2002-04-12 15:14, The Curtmudgeon wrote:
I didn't mean to imply that every single science fact in Verne's writing got scrubbed by the translator;


No worries, i have no idea what translated version i read since it was too long ago, but agree there was some good science involved /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Apr-13, 09:50 AM
On 2002-04-12 12:31, ToSeek wrote:
As I recall, From the Earth to the Moon

On the other hand, don't the inhabitants of the unpowered spaceship enter zero gravity when they reach the balance point between the Earth and moon--but experience nearly normal gravity otherwise?

I read it a long time ago.

Simon
2002-Apr-14, 10:58 AM
On 2002-04-13 05:50, GrapesOfWrath wrote:

On the other hand, don't the inhabitants of the unpowered spaceship enter zero gravity when they reach the balance point between the Earth and moon--but experience nearly normal gravity otherwise?

I read it a long time ago.


Yeah, they do. Bit of a goof on acceleration there. But my main impression when I read Verne was that he was pretty much at the cutting edge of science -as it stood in 186x.

informant
2002-Apr-15, 05:37 PM
Isn't there a scene in Around The Moon where the interplanetary travellers open a window (in the middle of the voyage), and they have no trouble in breathing in the vacuum?
I'm not trying to trash Verne, though. His novels seemed scientifically "good", considering the time when they were written, and considering also that they were some of the earliest science fiction stories ever.
But I think that his most 'prophetic' work is probably 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: informant on 2002-04-15 13:38 ]</font>

ToSeek
2002-Apr-15, 05:41 PM
On 2002-04-15 13:37, informant wrote:
But I think that his most 'prophetic' work is probably 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea


He even got the name of the first nuclear submarine right! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

The Curtmudgeon
2002-Apr-15, 06:58 PM
On 2002-04-12 15:14, The Curtmudgeon wrote:
...I'll try to remember to get on-line this weekend from home (I usually post from work, as now) where I've got my 'Annotated JVs' and post some examples of the problems and the corrected translations.


My bad; for you non-USans, it was Pre-IRS Weekend this past weekend (taxes, doncha know) and I got distracted. I finally found my W2 form 11:15 this morning....

Anyway, I'll try to get to it some night this week; I have no baseball games to go to, so fewer distractions than normal, now that the shirt-off-my-back is in the mail to You Know Whom.

The ("I've got sixpence, jolly, jolly sixpence; I've got sixpence to last me all my life!") Curtmudgeon

Donnie B.
2002-Apr-16, 09:31 AM
I've got twopence to spend, and twopence to lend, and
Twopence to send home to my wife (poor wife)...

Hey, wait, I'm not married! I guess Uncle Sam gets that too. As long as they spend it on NASA! (There, I made this post on-topic!)

Launch window
2005-Nov-10, 02:29 AM
Today, about 98 percent of the hardware for Jules Verne, Europe's first Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) spaceship, considered to be the most complex space vehicle ever developed in Europe, is already assembled and almost ready to fly.
"Obviously we cannot launch unless we have everything 100 percent ready and fully tested", said John Ellwood, ESA's ATV Project Manager. "The extensive three-year test campaign on such a complicated programme -- with its unavoidable problems and delays -- will push us back by almost one year, to 2007."
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=18210
Technical challenges push the launch of the ATV to 2007
http://www.esa.int/images/compare_atv_array400.jpg

http://www.esa.int/images/atv_cutaway_low,1.jpg
http://www.esa.int/esaMI/ATV/ESA4ZJ0VMOC_0.html
http://www.esa.int/images/compare_atv400.jpg




another older report
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=24468
Cargo Ship Testing

publiusr
2005-Nov-10, 08:34 PM
Parom might give it a run for its money. A Kliper/ATV combo gives the Old World a good MOL.

Launch window
2006-Jan-07, 11:44 PM
EADS SPACE RESTRUCTURES: WILL REDUCE WORKFORCE BY 700
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=18911
EADS Space, subsidiary of the European group EADS, announced Friday December 2nd, 2005, that it is restructuring and will phase out 700 jobs over the next three years (starting in 2006). The cuts will take place in their research departments and will affect 500 subcontractors and 200 internal employees. They do not however foresee any layoffs. The reduction was deemed necessary as the launch industry has seen an important decrease in new projects and is also confronted with the end of the developmental phase of three big programs: Ariane 5, the ATV transport vehicle and the M51 ballistic missile. The news came on the heels of another EADS Space announcement. EADS Space has finalized its acquisition of Dutch Space, which specializes in robotics and solar panels. [Agence France Presse 12/2/05, Le Monde 12/3/05]

Spherical
2006-Jan-08, 12:13 AM
As I recall, From the Earth to the Moon had the American voyagers taking off from Florida (Texas was considered but dismissed) and achieving an escape velocity of about 25,000 mph in a ship they dubbed the Columbiad. Also, one of the dogs on board dies, and they eject the body, which follows along with them.

Sounds pretty darn good to me.
Verne chose Cape Canaveral, as a matter of fact, and explained that it was the very best place in the US from which to launch such an expedition. I don't think he knew much about the soil conditions there though, because I guarantee you they would have been challenging for that big gun.

Launch window
2006-Jan-14, 07:38 AM
latest photos ( 11 January 2006 )
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEM0EPG23IE_1.html
http://www.esa.int/esaHS/SEM0EPG23IE_index_0.html
2006: a challenging year for Jules Verne

http://www.astronautix.com/craft/esahicle.htm
The European Space Agency also considered using the Ariane-5/ATV to launch the Columbus laboratory.
http://www.lunaroutpost.com/gallery/esa_european_space_agency/pages/atv002.htm
http://aerospacescholars.jsc.nasa.gov/HAS/cirr/ss/4/5.cfm
ATV - about half of the cargo will consist of food, clothing and the like. Propellant for reboosting the ISS, water, oxygen and nitrogen, and ISS fuel will make up the other half.

Launch window
2006-Jan-17, 11:44 AM
New ESA CEV Class Spacecraft Based on ATV

http://www.usspacenews.com/index.html
January 16, 2006

ESA is exploring the design for a CEV class spacecraft based on the ATV.
This new crewed spacecraft share
common hardware and software with the ATV (including autonomous
rendezvous and docking). Principle
differences are in thermal control, enhanced ECLSS, escape and
recovery capabilities and crew systems

spfrss
2006-Jan-17, 01:25 PM
I have heard from other sources that most of the English translations of Verne are wretched.

Italian ones, too, there are some good ones but are hard to find. It is a pity.

Mauro

ryanmercer
2006-Jan-17, 01:26 PM
Yay! I love Verne...(I've read nearly every work of his that has beent ranslated to english... actually I have read every single one, except for The Mysterious Island, which I plan on finishing today... There are still quite a few that need translated from French so I can read them... especially the one his great-nephew or great-grandson fuond a few years ago).

publiusr
2006-Jan-25, 09:23 PM
New ESA CEV Class Spacecraft Based on ATV

http://www.usspacenews.com/index.html
January 16, 2006



That is a good website. It has been updated, and the J-2 looks to be the official winner for upper stage use. Some scuttlebutt that Delta IV is to be terminated. The author took it back--but who knows?

Launch window
2006-Feb-02, 09:58 PM
Energia head Nikolai Sevastyanov wants the International Space Station (ISS) to become an international spaceport - while increasing the number of people crew on board to six next year.
Sevastyanov's plans are based around the debut of the ESA (European Space Agency) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) in 2007 and the Japanese H-II (HTV) transfer vehicle in 2009.
Russia aiming for ISS spaceport
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?id=4275
The ATV will have three times the capacity of the Russian Progress vehicle (increasing capacity of re-supplies to nine metric tons), but has been delayed several times due to software and engineering integration issues.

Swift
2006-Feb-02, 11:10 PM
latest photos ( 11 January 2006 )
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEM0EPG23IE_1.html
http://www.esa.int/esaHS/SEM0EPG23IE_index_0.html
2006: a challenging year for Jules Verne

I love this picture
http://www.esa.int/images/ATV-Londonbus400.gif
Is there a real need to put a bus in orbit? :D

JohnW
2006-Feb-02, 11:12 PM
I love this picture
http://www.esa.int/images/ATV-Londonbus400.gif
Is there a real need to put a bus in orbit? :D
What does "need" have to do with it? They're engineers.

publiusr
2006-Feb-03, 04:29 PM
Trash is a big problem. In the future, some large instuments, labs, etc may need the extra space. Ariane 5 is like Energiya-M: It uses low density high-volume LH2, and as a result, has a pretty wide payload shroud.

Titan IV, Delta III, and the recent Atlas V Centaur looked like elephants riding fleas due to denser first stages underneath wider hydrogen upper stages.

Wider payloads shrouds allow for simpler spacecraft builds. So with Verne being about the width of Ariane itself, you have some volume. It really isn't a lot better than TKS Spekter modules on Mir, but is a cleaner design.

Launch window
2006-Mar-06, 07:19 PM
Although no one will be launched in an ATV, astronauts, dressed in regular clothing, will be able to access the contents of the pressurized part of the ICC during its joint orbital flight with the ISS.
FLUID AND DRY CARGO
The ATV is designed to re-supply the ISS with up to 7667 kg for net cargo. Depending on the ISS own needs, the ATV is able to accommodate very different combinations of supplies, carrying up to:
- 840 kg of drinking water
- 100 kg of gas (air or oxygen or nitrogen)
- 860 kg of refueling propellant for the station own propulsion system
- 4700 kg of propellant for re-boost
- 5500 kg of dry supplies like bags, drawers and fresh food
All the dry cargo will be stored in the pressurized upper segment (ICC) that docks with the ISS.
http://www.spaceflight.esa.int/projects/index.cfm?act=default.page&level=11&page=779
The "nose" of the ICC contains the Russian-made docking equipment and various kinds of rendezvous sensors. The Russian docking system enables physical, electrical and propellant connections with the Station and it also ensures the ISS crew access to the ICC. The associated Russian made electronics are installed on the side of the front racks in the pressurized module.

Europe has also worked on the cupola,
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=19638
the Cupola project was started in America by NASA and Boeing, but was cancelled as a result of cost cuts. After a barter agreement between NASA and ESA, development of the Cupola was taken over by Europe in 1998. Under contract by ESA, the Italian company Alenia Spazio designed, developed and integrated the Cupola in Turin, Italy, leading an industrial team made up six major European aerospace companies: CASA (Spain), APCO (Switzerland), SAAB Ericsson (Sweden), Lindholmen Development (Sweden), EADS Space Transportation (Germany) and Verhaert (Belgium). The Cupola, with its seven windows, is very unlike any of the other modules on the International Space Station and so presented some unique challenges for design, development and manufacture. For example, the six trapezoidal side-windows, and the 80-cm diameter circular rooftop window of the Cupola must be able to withstand the extreme environment that they will be exposed to in space.

JohnD
2006-Mar-06, 08:29 PM
Going back to Jules Verne's scientific validity:
Remind me - wasn't his moon ship launched by - a gun?
Had no fuel?
Crash landed on the Moon?
And found a viable ecology there?

Great science fiction, but not science.

In fact, most of what purports to be science fiction nowadays is about as scientific, being fantasy by another name. Bring back Asimov,Clarke, Niven, and Ian M.Banks!
John

Baloo
2006-Mar-06, 10:17 PM
Going back to Jules Verne's scientific validity:
Remind me - wasn't his moon ship launched by - a gun?


Yes, it was.



Had no fuel?


Actually it had several rockets that they intended to use in the final stage of the moon descent, but in the end they've used them to de-orbit and return to Earth (actually they wanted to de-orbit toward the Moon, but the manoeuver didn't worked as planed).



Crash landed on the Moon?


No, it didn't crash on the Moon.



And found a viable ecology there?


Actually while above the far side of the Moon they've caught a glimpse of a landscape (moonscape?) and in those few seconds they've seen some features that could have been interpreted as vegetation, but the issue remains unanswered in the book.



Great science fiction, but not science.


IMO is more science than fiction; IIRC the first chapters of the book contain a detailed calculation of the escape velocities, fire angle, transit times, propelant parameters, etc, etc...I'd love to see such OOM calculations on the ATM section of this very board. :shifty:

JonClarke
2006-Mar-06, 11:12 PM
Going back to Jules Verne's scientific validity:
Remind me - wasn't his moon ship launched by - a gun?

Yes


Had no fuel?

No, it had rockets for lunar landing and take off


Crash landed on the Moon?

No - thrown of course by earth's second satellite


And found a viable ecology there?

No


Great science fiction, but not science.

For 1865 it was great science - give the man a break!


In fact, most of what purports to be science fiction nowadays is about as scientific, being fantasy by another name. Bring back Asimov,Clarke, Niven, and Ian M.Banks!
John[/QUOTE]

Niven pulls more fast ones than Verne ever did and has dated a lot faster.

Jon

Launch window
2006-Mar-15, 02:30 AM
Moon-based radiotelescope planned
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=19248
Leiden -- EADS SPACE Transportation and the Netherlands Foundation for Astronomy ASTRON/LOFAR signed a memorandum of understanding on Thursday in Leiden, Netherlands. The companies want to test the feasibility of a long wave radio telescope on the moon. A Dutch and German preliminary study should be the first phase. The program is then likely to be expanded in a second phase to include other European participants through ESA. EADS SPACE and ASTRON are therefore contributing to a European moon program.

Italy plans telescope on moon
http://www.physorg.com/news9589.html
Italy plans to build a telescope on the moon to expand its knowledge of the universe, the Italian News Agency ANSA says.


aboout the ATV

Flight profile
'Jules Verne' will be the first of 8 ATVs planned to be launched from 2006 throughout the following ten years. The 20,7 tonnes ATV is well protected at the top of Ariane 5 during the three minutes of high pressure aerodynamic ascent.
http://www.spaceflight.esa.int/projects/index.cfm?act=default.page&level=11&page=380
The 20.7-tonne cargo ship can interrupt the rendezvous at any time  by stopping its motion and by flying away from the 120-ton ISS.
'Jules Verne' will demonstrate all these capabilities and re-supply ISS with 6.7 tonnes of water, refuelling propellant for the station, and dry cargo such as bags.
When the docking is achieved, 'Jules Verne' will be an intrinsic part of the ISS for up to six months.

Launch window
2006-Mar-26, 11:38 PM
The European Robotic Arm (ERA)
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM838OVGJE_index_0.html

atv power point presentation
http://www.astron.nl/p/news/LO/ATV-Vortrag.ppt

Launch window
2006-Mar-27, 07:58 PM
Successful downlink communication test for ATV from ISS
http://www.esa.int/esaHS/SEMUSSM65LE_index_0.html
27 March 2006
Earlier this month, 352 kilometres above the Earth, over three orbital passes, the proximity communication link - indispensable for the first Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS) - was able to transmit "loud and clear" signals from the Station to two ground stations in Spain during a downlink test.

Launch window
2006-Jul-17, 04:28 PM
Europe set for bigger station role
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/5186646.stm

Esa has promised five ATV cargo ships to the space station project through to 2015.

mugaliens
2006-Jul-18, 07:21 PM
Jules Verne in space? Jules Verne was never in space...

It's concievable that a gun-launched vehicle, even one containing humans, could survive a shot to the moon. There would have to be provisions, of course, such as saline-immersed astronauts (to take the incredible g-forces), a very lengthy gun with staged, sealable compartments (boom-----boom----boom---boom--boom-boomboom!), and a lunar orbiter/lander capable of withstanding the acceleration.

But it's certainly doable.

Launch window
2006-Aug-28, 01:36 AM
ATV on track for 2007 debut

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?cid=4677

Ronald Brak
2006-Aug-28, 01:58 AM
Isn't there a scene in Around The Moon where the interplanetary travellers open a window (in the middle of the voyage), and they have no trouble in breathing in the vacuum?

Verne missed the fact that when you open a hatch there would be explosive decompression, however, no one attempts to breath in a vacuum.

Selenite
2006-Aug-28, 02:23 AM
If I recall Verne also predicted the splashdown as the Columbiad shell is found floating off the California coast by a passing steamer.

I also seem to recall there was a lot of debate in the second half of the book as to whether the moon's craters were volcanic or meteoric in origin. Apparently that was a major source of scientific controversy back then.

mugaliens
2006-Aug-28, 05:06 PM
Agreed, but you forgot Heinlein, one of the more hard-science SF writers of all time. True, some of his work was out there, but much of the earlier stuff has come to pass in many ways.

And my favorite works by JV include 20,000 Leagues and The Mysterious Island, both unabridged.

Launch window
2006-Sep-14, 07:57 PM
ATV during acoustic test in ESTEC
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMCKHZ7QQE_FeatureWeek_0.html
The ATV resupply ship is Europe's main contribution for the operational phase of the ISS programme. The first flight is due in 2007. The ATV will be launched by Ariane 5 every 15-18 months and will remain docked to the ISS for six months, as a pressurized and integral part of the Station, providing an additional 43 cubic-metres of volume accessible to the crew. At the end of its mission, it will be loaded with up to 6500 kg of waste. After undocking, it will be sent on a re-entry trajectory leading to its disintegration in the atmosphere.

Launch window
2006-Dec-24, 07:36 AM
Jules Verne goes hot and cold

http://www.physorg.com/news85317725.html

Launch window
2007-Mar-23, 06:36 PM
Worldwide testing and ISS traffic push ATV launch to autumn 2007
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=22192

JohnD
2007-Mar-23, 11:17 PM
As launch window has revived this thread:

Other authors due for recognition:

Rudyard Kipling? Bet you didn't expect him? But he was an enormously wide ranging author, who wrote SF and fantasy as well as hard journalism, epic poetry and excellent novels. In particular, his "With the Night Mail" matches the finest of the hard SF writers, and "Puck" with any fantasist. John Campbell thought highly of him, John Brunner put together a collection of his SF stories.
But I suppose he's not a runner as he never wrote of space travel.

JOhn

mugaliens
2007-Mar-24, 01:56 PM
New ISS transfer vehicle named for early sf writer (http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99992165)

Yeah! Although I'm sure it took Back to the Future Part III to bring his name into the limelight.

Mysterious Island was always one of my most favorite novels.

JonClarke
2007-Mar-25, 08:37 AM
Yeah! Although I'm sure it took Back to the Future Part III to bring his name into the limelight.

??? JV was in the limelight long before then. The allusion would not have worked unless JV was a name well known the to viewers of that movie. In fact he would be the only SF writer of the period whose name is widely known today.

Not only have manynof his books been continuously in print, there may been many film versions (of varying quality) of different ones - Round the World in 80 days, Jourrey to the Centre of the Earth, 20,000 Leagues to the Bottom of the Sea. Duering the Apollo period there was an enormous revival of interest in From the Earth to the Moon and Round the Moon.

Ilya
2007-Mar-26, 02:26 PM
Isn't there a scene in Around The Moon where the interplanetary travellers open a window (in the middle of the voyage), and they have no trouble in breathing in the vacuum?

"Have no trouble" is not the word I'd use -- they nearly die, but from cold, not from decompression. Which is forgivable -- I don't think anyone in 1860's knew what low pressure actually does. Or high pressure, for that matter.

Launch window
2007-Apr-27, 04:35 PM
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMQ2AMJC0F_index_0.html

If you think you can come up with the ideal playlist for astronauts flying around the Earth in the International Space Station , ESA wants to hear from you.


Space Truckin by Deep Purple ?
Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon
Star Trekkin'! We come in peace! (shoot to kill, shoot to kill, men!)
2000 Light Years from Home from the Rolling Stones ?
Rocket Man by Elton John.
prodigy Out Of Space
Astronomy by Metallica
musical version of war of the worlds ?
The Planets by Holst

loglo
2007-Apr-28, 12:43 PM
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMQ2AMJC0F_index_0.html


Space Truckin by Deep Purple ?
Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon
Star Trekkin'! We come in peace! (shoot to kill, shoot to kill, men!)
2000 Light Years from Home from the Rolling Stones ?
Rocket Man by Elton John.
prodigy Out Of Space
Astronomy by Metallica
musical version of war of the worlds ?
The Planets by Holst


"From the tea-Rooms of Mars ..to the Hell-holes of Uranus" by Landscape :dance:

Launch window
2007-Jul-14, 02:46 AM
ATV starts journey to Kourou (http://www.esa.int/esaHS/SEMCS6HYX3F_index_0.html)

01101001
2008-Mar-10, 07:47 AM
So, the exciting launch activity having been over-documented in topic Initial Jules Verne ATV Countdown and Launch (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/70255-initial-jules-verne-atv-countdown-launch.html), we now await the eventual docking, in early April.

Meanwhile, we're awaiting analysis of the end-of-launch glitch:

Houston Chronicle: Glitch detected in Europe's cargo capsule (http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/space/5604617.html)


"We will look at all of the various options and eliminate them all one by one to find out what is going on," [ESA space station program manager] Thirkettle told a briefing that was recorded and posted on the agency's Web site, www.esa.int (http://www.esa.int), along with a statement.

Other systems on the 42,000-pound spacecraft were functioning normally as the ship circled Earth at an altitude of 156 miles. The freighter is designed to carry out its docking mission with the remaining thrusters in a backup role, said John Ellwood, European Space Agency mission manager.

Engineers could not rule out the possibility the pressure drop was a temporary response to heavy vibrations that accompanied Saturday's launch, Ellwood said.

Useful links:
ESA: ATV - Jules Verne (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/index.html)
ESA: About ATV (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/ESAE021VMOC_0.html)
Wikipedia: Automated Transfer Vehicle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automated_Transfer_Vehicle)

01101001
2008-Mar-10, 02:45 PM
They must still be feverishly anlyzing the glitch. I don't see much new news.

Most recent seems to be BBC: Space truck orbits despite fault (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7287417.stm):


The anomaly has shut down seven of the 28 attitude control jets and one of the space truck's four main engines.

Engineers are now investigating with a view to getting them all back online.

Even if they cannot, the vehicle is more than capable of completing its approach and docking to the space station, say European Space Agency (Esa) officials.

The ATV cannot approach the orbiting platform until after space shuttle Endeavour, due for launch on Tuesday, has completed its mission.

This gave engineers plenty of time to resolve the anomaly, explained Esa's ATV project manager John Ellwood.

01101001
2008-Mar-13, 05:50 AM
Glitch resolved. See Universe Today topic Relief as Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) Propulsion System is Fixed (http://www.bautforum.com/universe-today-story-comments/71483-relief-automated-transfer-vehicle-atv-propulsion-system-fixed.html).

ESA ATV News: Successful manoeuvres position Jules Verne ATV for crucial tests (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMN1FM5NDF_0.html)


Jules Verne ATV successfully performed two boosts today, bringing the spacecraft to an altitude of 303 km – half-way between the insertion orbit reached after last Sunday's launch and the orbit of the International Space Station.

The boosts used two of the four main engines on the Automated Transfer Vehicle. Each boost lasted for approximately 2 minutes and provided a change in velocity of just over 6 m/s. Today's burns came on top of two burns conducted by mission controllers at ESA's ATV Control Centre yesterday.
"Everything is working perfectly now on both the main and redundant propulsion chains," explains John Ellwood, ESA's ATV Project Manager. "The same chain – Propulsion Configuration A - that we switched to on Monday was used to perform the two boosts yesterday and the two boosts today."
[...]
In the next two days the ATV team will try out one of the spacecraft's main safety features - the Collision Avoidance Manoeuvre, or CAM. Jules Verne ATV is equipped with a completely independent system with which ATV can be given a boost away from the Space Station if necessary during the craft's automated docking procedure.

mugaliens
2008-Mar-15, 12:32 PM
I have heard from other sources that most of the English translations of Verne are wretched.

I dunno. My unabridged version of Mysterious Island is highly enjoyable, although the language is a bit stilted.

01101001
2008-Mar-25, 02:49 AM
ESA: Shooting a Par-3 hole in space: Three steps to ATV docking (http://www.esa.int/esaMI/ATV/SEMQ29N5NDF_0.html)

(Somewhat old news, but it's time to start thinking about the ATV again, now that shuttle Endeavour is clearing away from the ISS.)


20 March 2008
Jules Verne ATV is lining up for Europe's first-ever automated docking in space. Following two demonstrations, the final 'putt' must be more accurate and gentle than on any rolling golf green.

Now that the vessel is 'on the green' - in a parking orbit 2000 m ahead of the ISS - ATV mission controllers must pace the spacecraft through two pending and crucial demonstration dockings, moving successively closer to the ISS, and then finally go for an actual rendezvous and docking attempt on 3 April.
[...]
Demonstration Day 1 - 29 March - 16:34 CET
[...]
Demonstration Day 2 - 31 March - 14:40 CEST
[...]
Docking - 3 April - 16:20 CEST

Swift
2008-Mar-25, 01:23 PM
ESA: Shooting a Par-3 hole in space: Three steps to ATV docking (http://www.esa.int/esaMI/ATV/SEMQ29N5NDF_0.html)

I assume they have a Scotsman as the flight controller then. ;)

01101001
2008-Mar-28, 03:43 PM
ESA - ATV: Follow live Jules Verne ATV's first attempt to dock with the International Space Station (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMH76R03EF_0.html)


28 March 2008
After several days spent in a parking orbit 2000 km ahead of the ISS, Jules Verne ATV is now ready to join up with the International Space Station. This first docking attempt can be followed live on 3 April 2008 from 15:30 CEST onwards from one of the European participating centres.
[...]
The docking of Jules Verne ATV is scheduled for 3 April at 16:41 CEST.
[...]
For more information and updates on Jules Verne ATV, including live streaming of Demoday 2 on 31 March (video feed courtesy NASA TV) and the first docking attempt on 3 April see: http://www.esa.int/atv.

Docking target:
3 April, 0741 PDT
3 April, 1041 EDT
3 April, 1441 UTC
3 April, 1641 CEST

6 days to docking

01101001
2008-Mar-29, 03:53 AM
March 29: Demoday 1 -- Step 1 of Shooting a Par-3 hole in space: Three steps to ATV docking (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMQ29N5NDF_0.html)


Demonstration Day 1 - 29 March - 15:19 CET

The main purpose of Demo Day 1 is to test the ATV's Guidance & Navigation System; the test will be commanded from ATV-CC. This is expected to show that the ATV can perform relative navigation with the ISS using relative GPS (global positioning satellites) to successfully and safely manoeuvre ATV to station point S2, located 3500 m behind the ISS and at the same orbital altitude.

29 March, 0719 PDT
29 March, 1019 EDT
29 March, 1419 UTC
29 March, 1519 CET

Edit: Jules Verne ATV Demonstration Day 1 sequence of events (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMFW8R03EF_0.html)


Time CET Activity Distance to ISS
15:19 Depart station point S-1/2 39 km
16:05 Arrive at station point S1 15.5 km
16:51 Arrive at station point S2 3.5 km
18:29-18:36 Perform 'Escape' from S2 3.5 km

01101001
2008-Mar-29, 05:12 PM
Demoday 1 appears to be going well.

ESA ATV Blog (http://webservices.esa.int/blog/)


A couple of exciting moments in the ATV Control Centre just a few moments ago. First a report from the crew onboard the International Space Station that they could actually see Jules Verne! And then, we could all see it for ourselves and as more than a white speck too!

According to the schedule of events, Jules Verne has arrived at station point S2, 3.5 km distant and coming up, bottom of the hour, is last event (Demoday 1 sequence (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMFW8R03EF_0.html)):


18:29-18:36 [CEST] Perform 'Escape' from S2 3.5 km

Oh, one older blog entry has the link for Lizard-Tail GoogleSatTrack (http://www.lizard-tail.com/isana/tracking/index.html?&target=atv), showing the ISS and Jules Verne -- just in case you want to know where in the world the pair are hanging out now. (At this moment: just east of New Zealand, just entered daylight, heading up toward Europe.)

Edit, a half-hour after the last event, from the blog:


Jules Verne performs Escape manoeuvre

The Escape command was sent from ATV Control Centre at 18:30 CET. Jules Verne could be seen moving away from the ISS. The team is now analysing the data collected. More later...

Pending analysis, on to Demoday 2!

01101001
2008-Mar-30, 08:18 PM
http://www.esa.int/images/ATV_medium,0.jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/index.html)

ESA - ATV: Jules Verne receives go for next step (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMIUAR03EF_0.html) (Go for Demoday 2)


30 March 2008
International Space Station managers have today given the go-ahead for Jules Verne ATV to proceed with the second of two demonstration days in the lead up to a first ISS docking attempt later in the week. On Monday, Demonstration Day 2 will see ATV approach to within 11 m of the ISS.
[...]
During Demonstration Day 2, scheduled to start at 14:26 CEST (12:26 UT) on Monday 31 March[...]

(Um... I think I confused CEST (Central Eurpean Summer Time) with CET in some articles above -- but, what's an hour among friends? Oh, it's not so bad as I first thought; the switchover must happen this weekend. Will repair other articles.)

Demonstration day 2 activites begin:
Monday, March 31, 0526 PDT
Monday, March 31, 0826 EDT
Monday, March 31, 1226 UTC
Monday, March 31, 1426 CEST

Edit: It looks like there will be video coverage of Demoday 2. NASA TV Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/MM_NTV_Breaking.html) (times EDT):


March 31, Monday
10 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. - Coverage of the "Jules Verne" Automated Transfer Vehicle's Second Demonstration Test Approach to the International Space Station (Closest Approach to 36 feet scheduled at approximately 12:30 p.m.) - JSC (Public and Media Channels)

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

(According to earlier articles, same video will be available via ESA. At the time, see ESA: ATV - Jules Verne (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/index.html).)

===

Useful links:
ESA: ATV - Jules Verne (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/index.html)
ESA: About ATV (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/ESAE021VMOC_0.html)
ESA: ATV Blog (http://www.esa.int/blog)
Wikipedia: Automated Transfer Vehicle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automated_Transfer_Vehicle)

01101001
2008-Mar-31, 03:30 PM
Demoday 2 currently on NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Coverage:
0700 - 0945 PDT
1000 - 1245 EDT
1400 - 1645 UTC
1600 - 1845 CEST

This screen capture from NASA TV shows Jules Verne at about 100 m distance:
7545

Final approach (from 250 m 11 m) beginning at about 45 minutes past the hour.

Same NASA video feed, via ESA (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEM74A5QGEF_0.html)

ESA: Jules Verne ATV Demonstration Day 2 sequence of events (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEM80B5QGEF_0.html)


Time CEST Activity Distance to ISS
14:26 Depart station point S-1/2 39 km
15:12 Arrive at station point S1 15.5 km
15:58 Arrive at station point S2 3.5 km
17:10 Arrive at station point S3 249 m
17.53 Retreat test
17:55 Hold test
17:59 Resume test
18:13 Arrive at station point S4 19 m
18:31 Arrive at station point S41 11 m
18:34 Retreat from S41 11 m
18:36 Arrive at station point S4 19 m
18:38-18:45 Perform 'Escape' from S4

01101001
2008-Mar-31, 03:55 PM
Retreat issued.

Coming up:

17:55 Hold test
17:59 Resume test
18:13 Arrive at station point S4 19 m
18:31 Arrive at station point S41 11 m
18:34 Retreat from S41 11 m
18:36 Arrive at station point S4 19 m
18:38-18:45 Perform 'Escape' from S4

Edit, 59 minutes past the hour: Resume test issued. Approach begun.

Edit: Arrived at S4, holding at 19 m
7546

Edit: Arrived at S41, closest approach today, 11 m, ready to retreat
7547

Good little robot!

01101001
2008-Mar-31, 05:12 PM
All Demoday 2 objectives met.

Jules Verne withdrawing:
7548

Let's hook up Thursday, April 3!

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) coverage begins:
April 3, 0500 PDT
April 3, 0800 EDT
April 3, 1200 UTC
April 3, 1400 CEST

Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/MM_NTV_Breaking.html):

April 3, Thursday
8 - 11 a.m. - Coverage of the "Jules Verne" Automated Transfer Vehicle's Docking to the International Space Station (Docking scheduled at 10:38 a.m.) - JSC (Public and Media Channels)
12:30 p.m. - "Jules Verne" Automated Transfer Vehicle Post-Docking Briefing - JSC (Public and Media Channels)

Edit: Summary: ESA: Impressive dress-rehearsal for Jules Verne ATV (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMSGE5QGEF_0.html)


“I’m known for my understatements, but the only word that comes to mind about today is impressive,” said John Ellwood, ESA’s ATV Project Manager. “It was impressive to see how Jules Verne, the staff at the ATV Control Centre, the control centres in Moscow and Houston pulled together today. It was a perfect dress-rehearsal for Thursday.”
[...]
“This demonstration day confirmes the performance of the vehicle is even better than we had hoped for,” said Nicolas Chamussy, Astrium ATV Project Manager. “This is a world premier for automated rendezvous using optical sensors, following the world’s first demonstration of relative GPS navigation between Jules Verne and the Station performed on Saturday.”

Spotted in ESA: ATV Blog (http://www.esa.int/blog): Demoday 2 gallery of images (http://webservices.esa.int/blog/album/1/31)

01101001
2008-Apr-02, 06:00 PM
ESA: Jules Verne ATV given 'go' for docking (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMDQL5QGEF_0.html):


2 April 2008
Jules Verne was today formally cleared to proceed with the first ISS docking attempt, scheduled for 3 April 2008 at 16:41 CEST (14:41 UT). The official go-ahead came from the International Space Station Mission Management Team (IMMT) after two flawless demonstration days in which Jules Verne proved its operational capabilities.

"We have proven that Jules Verne's systems are safe, reliable and ready to dock to the Station. Everyone has worked very hard to get to this point, and we have also proven that the team on the ground is fully ready for tomorrow's first attempt," said John Ellwood, ESA's ATV Project Manager.
[...]
Tomorrow's docking attempt will see Jules Verne move past station keeping point S41 [11 m] to actually dock with the Russian ISS module's docking port. Contact of the vessel's docking probe is expected at 16:41 CEST (14:41 UT), with full capture scheduled at 17:15 CEST (15:15 UT). If the docking does not occur for any reason, the next possible window occurs 48 hours later on Saturday, 5 April.
[...]
The rendezvous and docking will be broadcast live by ESA TV, 16:00-17:15 CEST (14:00-15:15 UT); details are available on the ESA TV web page under http://television.esa.int/.

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) coverage begins:
April 3, 0500 PDT
April 3, 0800 EDT
April 3, 1200 UTC
April 3, 1400 CEST

18 hours to start of docking coverage (according to NASA TV schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/MM_NTV_Breaking.html), but ESA video coverage is supposed to start at 1400 UTC; maybe NASA is just giving it more time; they agree, within minutes, on when contact occurs: 1441 UTC; 1041 EDT)

01101001
2008-Apr-03, 07:10 AM
Hah. On NASA TV I caught ISS Flight Control doing a late-night publicity group photo for the upcoming Jules Verne docking. The ISS crew was smiling too, and present up on the big board.

7559

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) coverage begins:
April 3, 0500 PDT
April 3, 0800 EDT
April 3, 1200 UTC
April 3, 1400 CEST

4 hours 50 minutes to start of docking coverage

01101001
2008-Apr-03, 12:40 PM
We're 40 minutes into coverage.

ESA: Follow the Jules Verne ATV docking (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEM6CQ5QGEF_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/iss016e034191_M,1.jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEM6CQ5QGEF_0.html) (artist's impression)


Contact of the vessel's docking probe is expected at 16:40 CEST (14:40 UT), with full capture scheduled at 17:14 CEST (15:14 UT).

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) coverage began:
April 3, 0500 PDT
April 3, 0800 EDT
April 3, 1200 UTC
April 3, 1400 CEST

Coming up:

500 m [Visible in Zvezda video systen]
S3(249 m behind) S3 arrival 15:16 CEST S3 depart 15:52 CEST
S4(19 m behind) S4 arrival 16:13 CEST S4 depart 16:29 CEST
S41 (11 m behind) S41 arrival 16:31 CEST S41 depart 16:37 CEST
Capture 16:40 CEST
Hooks closed 17:14 CEST


ESA: ATV Blog (http://www.esa.int/blog) is logging current events.
(And I shall be heading out for a morning run and a couple cups of delicious fresh hot coffee, so I shall miss the adrenaline, but, after all, Mr. Endorphin and Mrs. Caffeine are my true masters.)

First contact target:
April 3, 0740 PDT
April 3, 1040 EDT
April 3, 1440 UTC
April 3, 1640 CEST

2 hours to contact

Swift
2008-Apr-03, 01:44 PM
So, as the Jules Verne approaches the ISS, is there a little back-up alarm beeping on it, and an astronaut standing on the loading dock going "little more, keep coming, keep coming.... wait STOP!". ;)

01101001
2008-Apr-03, 02:39 PM
Systems nominal. At 19 m.

7564

Go for approach to 11 m.

7565

Before I can finish the pictures, it's now at 11 meters.

Awaiting command to make contact.

Edit: 43 minutes past the hour: GO for docking.

01101001
2008-Apr-03, 02:48 PM
Contact.

7561

Textbook.

Awaiting command for hard mate.

Edit: Hard mate.

01101001
2008-Apr-03, 04:02 PM
ESA: Europe’s automated ship docks to the ISS (http://http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMORO5QGEF_0.html)


ATV Jules Verne, the European Space Agency’s first resupply and reboost vehicle, has successfully performed a fully automated docking with the International Space Station (ISS). This docking marks the beginning of Jules Verne’s main servicing mission to deliver cargo, propellant, water, oxygen and propulsion capacity to the Station, as well as ESA’s entry into the restricted club of the partners able to access the orbital facility by their own means.

The 19-ton unmanned spaceship manoeuvred from a holding position 39 km behind the 275-ton space outpost and conducted a 4-hour staged approach with several stops at reference points for checks. It autonomously computed its own position through relative GPS (comparison between data collected by GPS receivers both on the ATV and the ISS) and in close range it used videometers pointed at laser retroreflectors on the ISS to determine its distance and orientation relative to its target. Final approach was at a relative velocity of 7 cm/s and with an accuracy of less than 10 cm, while both the ATV and the ISS were orbiting at about 28000 km/h, some 340 km above the Eastern Mediterranean. ATV Jules Verne’s docking probe was captured by the docking cone at the aft end of Russia’s Zvezda module at 16:45 CEST (14:45 GMT). Docking was completed with hooks closing at 16:52 CEST (14:52 GMT).

ESA: Jules Verne Cargo (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEM2Z432VBF_0.html) (old story, worth a review):


When the Jules Verne ATV is launched to the ISS it will be carrying around 8.3 tonnes of wet and dry cargo with an additional 2.3 tonnes of cargo support hardware.
The cargo is split as follows:

Wet cargo

Propulsion propellant (5.8 tonnes) [...]
Refuelling propellant (860 kg) [...]
Water (270 kg) [...]
Oxygen (20 kg) [...]

Dry cargo

A total of 1.3 tonnes of dry cargo is being transported to the ISS inside the Integrated Cargo Carrier of the ATV. This includes 500 kg of food for the crew, 136 kg of spare parts for the European Columbus laboratory, which was launched and attached to the ISS in February 2008, 80 kg of clothing, and a number of additional items including public relations items to commemorate the Jules Verne ATV launch. This includes two Jules Verne manuscripts.

Manuscripts. Cool. Anyone up there read French?

Félicitations, M. Verne!

01101001
2008-Apr-05, 03:58 AM
ESA: Crew opens hatch to Jules Verne ATV (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMJ0GXMMEF_0.html)


4 April 2008
The hatch to the newly arrived Jules Verne ATV was opened for the first time by the International Space Station crew earlier today. Shortly after hatch opening the crew briefly entered ATV to place an air filtering device.

The so-called ‘air scrubber’ will be left to run for 8 hours to remove any unwanted gasses or small particles of debris that may be floating around. Once the air inside the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) is clean, the crew will fully enter the spacecraft’s cargo section for the first time on Saturday.
Over the next weeks the crew will remove the 1150 kg of dry cargo delivered by Jules Verne – including fuel, clothes, equipment as well as two original manuscripts handwritten by Jules Verne and a XIXth century illustrated edition of his novel “From the Earth to the Moon”. In addition the crew will pump 856 kg of propellant, 270 kg of drinking water and 21 kg of oxygen into Zvezda’s tanks.

01101001
2008-Apr-06, 06:25 AM
And, like day follows night...

ESA: Space Station crew enters Jules Verne ATV (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEM0UHXMMEF_0.html)


5 April 2008
The astronauts on board the International Space Station performed final ATV hatch opening at around 10:30 CEST (08:30 UT) this morning, clearing the way for the crew to start unloading Jules Verne’s cargo delivery.

Immediately after hatch reopening this morning, the lights inside Jules Verne ATV were turned on and the air scrubber dismounted. The crew will now install portable breathing apparatus, a fire extinguisher and the handrails which help the astronauts move around inside ATV. A flexible hose will also be installed to provide additional ventilation. Once all of these items are in place, ATV is ready for full, regular operations.

01101001
2008-Apr-25, 05:16 PM
ESA: Jules Verne boosts ISS orbit (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMPEISZEFF_index_0.html)


ESA's Jules Verne ATV was used for the first time early this morning to raise the orbit of the International Space Station. A 740-second burn of the Automated Transfer Vehicle's main engines successfully lifted the altitude of the 280-tonne Station by around 4.5 km to a height of 342 km above the Earth's surface.

There's a nice little Flash animation there of the Jules Verne pushing the ISS around.

01101001
2008-May-13, 04:27 PM
Manuscripts. Cool. Anyone up there read French?


Just saw Garrett Reisman asked about the manuscript.

Reply was along the lines of: Saw it. It's in French! Someone should tell them the French guy left. None of us reads French. But, the manuscript was tightly sealed and labeled: Under no circumstances should this be opened. So, it doesn't matter. It's neat to have here.

mugaliens
2008-May-16, 03:25 PM
New ISS transfer vehicle named for early sf writer (http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99992165)

I fail to see why this is names the Jules Ver in space thread, when JV died centuries ago.

Please name it something more appropriate.

01101001
2008-May-16, 03:53 PM
I fail to see why this is names the Jules Ver in space thread, when JV died centuries ago.

Please name it something more appropriate.

Perhaps you could suggest some titles much more fitting for the topic of the European Space Agency (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) Jules Verne that is finally now in space? (I suggest ESA: ATV (http://www.esa.int/esaMI/ATV/index.html) for background research.)

Swift
2008-May-29, 03:04 PM
From the BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7419793.stm)

A model of a proposed European manned spaceship has gone on show at the Berlin Air Show.

The design, which has been produced by EADS Astrium, is based on the unmanned "Jules Verne" freighter recently sent to the International Space Station.

Astrium says a crewed version of the truck is a logical evolution, and could fly in the next decade if it received support from European governments.

...

The idea is to combine what is essentially the avionics and propulsion end of Jules Verne (also known as the Automated Transfer Vehicle - ATV) with a crew compartment taking the place of the current cargo section.

Fraser also discuss it in his blog (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/05/29/europe-unveils-concept-for-manned-atv/), but I thought it worth repeating here.

01101001
2008-Aug-30, 01:43 AM
All good things must end.

The Space Fellowship: Inspections, Exercise and ATV Preps for Station Crew (http://spacefellowship.com/News/?p=6449) (August 28):


Europe’s Jules Verne Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) is being loaded with trash and discarded items before leaving the station Sept. 5. The ATV is undergoing final preparations before it undocks from the Zvezda service module and re-enters Earth’s atmosphere to burn up over the Pacific Ocean.

The Jules Verne gets a couple of weeks of autonomous flight before taking the big plunge.

See Universe Today: Countdown to the Final Burn: ATV Jules Verne will Undock on September 5th (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/08/29/countdown-to-the-final-burn-atv-jules-verne-will-undock-on-september-5th/)

01101001
2008-Sep-04, 06:46 AM
ESA: ATV - Jules Verne (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/index.html)

ESA ATV News: Jules Verne prepares for ISS departure (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEM5BEO4KKF_0.html)


2 September 2008
In just a few days time, the historical Jules Verne mission will draw to an end. After the ATV Control Centre commands the opening of the Automated Transfer Vehicle hooks, ESA's first resupply and reboost vehicle will perform a fully automated undocking with the International Space Station on 5 September at 23:30 CEST (21:30 UT).
[...]
Once its resupply mission is completed, the ATV, with its waste securely strapped and stored in the racks, will be manually closed by the crew on 4 September. A day later, Jules Verne ATV will be separated under control of the ATV-CC and Russian Mission Control Centre in Moscow (MCC-M).

A few weeks later, on 29 September, the ATV main engines will use their remaining fuel in two separate deorbit boosts to terminate the 3-week solo flight of Jules Verne. They will deorbit the 13.5-tonne spacecraft on a steep flight path, performing a controlled destructive re-entry high above a completely uninhabited area of the Pacific Ocean. The planning of this event in the night time will allow observation from two aircrafts containing a collection of ESA and NASA scientific experiments allowing optical imaging and spectrometric observations.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Sep-04, 12:57 PM
I fail to see why this is names the Jules Ver in space thread, when JV died centuries ago.

Please name it something more appropriate.
If you read the thread you'll have seen that part of the cargo is two Jules Verne manuscripts, which in itself is enough to justify the title.

01101001
2008-Sep-05, 06:00 PM
3-1/2 hours to undocking

Undocking target:
September 5 14:30 PDT
September 5 17:30 EDT
September 5 21:30 UTC
September 5 23:30 CEST

01101001
2008-Sep-05, 09:49 PM
The Jules Verne should be about 20 minutes undocked now.

Can't see it confirmed in the news yet.

Edit: Here's a story: SpaceflightNow: Jules Verne cargo ship departs the space station (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0809/05atvundock/index2.html)


Europe's first state-of-the-art Automated Transfer Vehicle departed the international space station today after a five-month stay that delivered more than 10,000 pounds of cargo to the complex.

Undocking was at 2129 GMT (5:29 p.m. EDT), ending a 155-day mission attached to the aft docking port of the station's Zvezda service module.
[...]
Physical separation occurred about five minutes after hooks inside the docking mechanism began opening. Jules Verne fired its engines one minute after undocking to change the ship's velocity by about 9 mph and send the craft on a path below and in front of the station.
[...]
The spacecraft is slated for a destructive re-entry into Earth's atmosphere Sept. 29 over the South Pacific.

Two de-orbit will lower Jules Verne's orbit into the atmosphere. Breakup of the 30,000-pound spacecraft is expected at an altitude of about 47 miles at 1347 GMT (8:47 a.m. EDT), Chesson said.

Salute.

slang
2008-Sep-06, 09:42 PM
Meanies! I payed taxes for that thingy and I don't even get to see it reenter? Boo. At least I got to see it flying just in front of ISS.

01101001
2008-Sep-25, 10:24 PM
NASA News Release: NASA Astronomers Compare Meteors to Spacecraft Re-entry [current Kepler title in error] (http://www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/news/releases/2008/08_84AR.html):


MEDIA ADVISORY : 08_84AR

A group of astronomers from NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA) and other institutions will take to the skies to observe the re-entry of ESA’s “Jules Verne” Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) as it falls back to Earth from the International Space Station on Sept. 29, 2008.

An Ames research aircraft will take off from Moffett Field, Calif., and a Douglas DC-8 airborne laboratory will depart from NASA’s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility at Palmdale, Calif., on Friday, Sept. 26, 2008 to fly more than 30 scientists and their instruments over the South Pacific Ocean in ideal and virtually unchanging conditions far above light pollution and clouds.

NASA’s primary goal during the lengthy airborne mission is to study the re-entry and fragmentation of ESA’s “Jules Verne” ATV spacecraft to gain insight and find similarities to meteor fragmentation. This observation campaign is similar to the January 2006 Stardust and September 2004 Genesis spacecraft re-entry airborne campaigns, in which NASA scientists studied the levels of radiation, light and out-gassing of the descending spacecraft, to better understand meteor radiation mechanisms.

NEOWatcher
2008-Sep-26, 02:43 PM
NASA News Release: NASA Astronomers Compare Meteors to Spacecraft Re-entry [current Kepler title in error] (http://www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/news/releases/2008/08_84AR.html):
A direct link (http://atv.seti.org/) to the "more information". Statuses pictures and updates.


Meanies! I payed taxes for that thingy and I don't even get to see it reenter? Boo. At least I got to see it flying just in front of ISS.
At least it will be seen by... Uh... er... um... Almost nobody?

01101001
2008-Sep-29, 04:25 PM
Adieu, Jules Verne.

http://www.esa.int/images/FSC_1660_ATV_KittingCalStateUEastBay800mmS_large,0 .jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMSB76EJLF_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/ATV08_0103_best_large,0.jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEMSB76EJLF_0.html) (European Space Agency, ESA)

ESA: Successful re-entry marks bright future for ATV (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ATV/SEME556EJLF_0.html)


Europe’s first Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) Jules Verne successfully completed its six-month ISS logistics mission today with its controlled destructive re-entry over a completely uninhabited area of the South Pacific.

Following a final deorbit burn at 14:58 CEST which slowed its velocity by 70 m/s, the ATV entered the upper atmosphere at an altitude of 120 km at 15:31 CEST. It broke up at an altitude of 75 km with the remaining fragments falling into the Pacific some 12 minutes later.
[...]
John Ellwood, ESA’s ATV Project Manager[:] “Not only to the ESA and industrial teams that brought the project to fruition, but also to the teams at the ATV Control Centre and around the world who have done a superb job while the spacecraft has been in orbit. This is truly a wonderful spacecraft, and vital to the continued service of the ISS following Shuttle retirement in 2010. I look forward to the launch of the next ATV, which is currently under production at EADS Astrium in Bremen, Germany.”

Hipernauta
2008-Oct-14, 01:27 AM
Hello

It is possible that in the future, NASA, leave aside the glider's STS

And take a economic systems, such as ATV

The capsules are the future?

Greetings