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View Full Version : Not Cool - Too loud during curling



mugaliens
2010-Feb-22, 07:49 PM
Article (http://sports.yahoo.com/olympics/vancouver/blog/fourth_place_medal/post/Candian-curling-fans-leave-Danish-player-in-tear?urn=oly,221320)

Why is it fans from some countries get it, and behave themselves appropriately, while fans from other countries don't?

Just curious...

ETA: I'm thinking the IOC should include a few rules of etiquitte front and center in the flyers they hand out to spectators.

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Feb-22, 07:54 PM
Article (http://sports.yahoo.com/olympics/vancouver/blog/fourth_place_medal/post/Candian-curling-fans-leave-Danish-player-in-tear?urn=oly,221320)

Why is it fans from some countries get it, and behave themselves appropriately, while fans from other countries don't?

Just curious...

ETA: I'm thinking the IOC should include a few rules of etiquitte front and center in the flyers they hand out to spectators.

I don't know if it's a matter of not "getting it," or just not being familiar with the traditions of a particular sport. Other sports have a tradition of loud fan participation.

Nick

Moose
2010-Feb-22, 08:33 PM
Yup. It's the price of having an etiquette-based sport at a venue with a large number of excited fan-n00bs. Hey, they're at the olympics, they may as well see a sport at which we usually win gold, and curling's like hockey, right? It's played on ice.

The big Canadian tournaments (Briar and Of Hearts) are much better behaved. Those are curling fans. Hopefully our press will talk about this some and the word will spread.

We're hosting, guys. Don't embarrass us further. Please.

Moose
2010-Feb-22, 08:34 PM
ETA: I'm thinking the IOC should include a few rules of etiquitte front and center in the flyers they hand out to spectators.

Yeah, this would help. Hopefully someone over there is thinking about this.

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-22, 08:48 PM
I don't know if it's a matter of not "getting it," or just not being familiar with the traditions of a particular sport. Other sports have a tradition of loud fan participation.

Only when they are winning :)

Sometimes it can be more fun when a team gets loud support. It makes it even sweeter when they lose (trying not to mention the H game).

Certain aiming sports should get respect though and be played in absolute silence because any sound can distract the player. Like Darts for instance. :whistle:

Fazor
2010-Feb-22, 08:53 PM
I think I can see both perspectives. I mean, I'm an avid baseball fan. I wouldn't think twice about stomping or chanting while trying to mess up a pitcher (well, unless it was a little-league game or something ;) I'm not that mean). But blocking out the crowd is part of that game.

Sports are exciting (at least to fans of the sport or team). It's hard to not get into it. But these people aren't used to such crowds. It's unfortunate, and in a sport like this it's rude.

But at the same time, I don't like blaming a crowd for one's inability to concentrate. Not that a Danish Olympic curler will likely read this thread, but; you got to the Olympics. You're obviously good. Don't worry about anyone else. Just do what you did to get you there in the first place.

tdvance
2010-Feb-22, 09:02 PM
I don't know if it's a matter of not "getting it," or just not being familiar with the traditions of a particular sport. Other sports have a tradition of loud fan participation.

Nick

Yeah, I painted my chest half red, half white, and drank booze and hollared loudly, and would you believe, they threw me out of the golf tournament!

Argos
2010-Feb-22, 09:10 PM
The complaint sounds like an excuse.

On the other hand, the crowds getting excited with curling is something I canīt really grasp. It is easily the most boring sport ever invented.

Fazor
2010-Feb-22, 09:41 PM
It is easily the most boring sport ever invented.
Agreed. This year I tried to give it a fair shake. I figure it's the butt of so many jokes that it at least deserved to be watched.

But no. There's no drama or excitement. It's like watching the family play bocce ball at a cook-out. Or sitting beside the shuffleboard court at the retirement home.

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-22, 09:43 PM
On the other hand, the crowds getting excited with curling is something I canīt really grasp. It is easily the most boring sport ever invented.

http://www.snailracing.net/

:dance:

Jim
2010-Feb-22, 10:36 PM
I guess some of you folks just don't get it. I saw curling for the first time two Olympics ago and fell in love with it. It's all about physics, strategy and touch.

As for fans yelling when they shouldn't, I dare anyone with any understanding of the game to watch the 10th end finish to the Men's Canada-GBR (Scotland) game and supress a cheer. Brilliant!

(Idle thought... Maybe they could increase interest in curling if they made it a contact sport, allowing the other team's sweepers to cross check, f'rinstance.)

ngc3314
2010-Feb-22, 10:40 PM
I gotta say, the overhead camera angles on the TV coverage (at least NBC's, however much they pay for it) have curling making a lot more sense to me than it ever did when you pretty much saw a side view of the stone's release and two people madly brushing the ice somewhere around it.

kleindoofy
2010-Feb-22, 10:43 PM
... I saw curling for the first time two Olympics ago and fell in love with it. It's all about physics, strategy and touch. ...
Rumor has it, growing grass has its fans too. Fascinating. ;)

I think curling is one of those sports which are wonderful to play oneself, but just terribly boring to watch.

aurora
2010-Feb-22, 10:46 PM
I've watched quite a bit of curling this time, and at the last Olympics as well.

I really like it. But then, I also like baseball and sailing. I like strategy more than tactics. I'm not really a hockey or basketball fan. Although I do watch quite a bit of Olympic hockey (but not the NHL).

I guess it also has something to do with Curling and Hockey being the only coverage we get during hours when I can watch TV. Thanks, NBC!

Argos
2010-Feb-22, 10:46 PM
http://www.snailracing.net/

:dance:

That was priceless. :)

mugaliens
2010-Feb-22, 10:46 PM
Hey, they're at the olympics, they may as well see a sport at which we usually win gold, and curling's like hockey, right? It's played on ice.

You know, this actually makes sense...


But at the same time, I don't like blaming a crowd for one's inability to concentrate. Not that a Danish Olympic curler will likely read this thread, but; you got to the Olympics. You're obviously good. Don't worry about anyone else. Just do what you did to get you there in the first place.

I see your point about complaining, and believe it should have been handled by way of an official complaint. The principle issue wasn't so much one of concentration, however, but one of communication. The curlers need to communicate with their broomers.


Idle thought... Maybe they could increase interest in curling if they made it a contact sport, allowing the other team's sweepers to cross check, f'rinstance.

Brooming scrums? :lol:

HenrikOlsen
2010-Feb-22, 11:19 PM
The commentator makes a world of difference in how you perceive curling, if it's one who actually understands for sport and can comment on the strategic parts of the playing it can be interesting, in a quiet cerebral way that admittedly has little to do with normal sports watching.

slang
2010-Feb-23, 12:38 AM
With curling it's no different than with many other sports.. once you understand (some of) the rules, subtle strategies, tactics, and human fallacies the sport becomes more interesting to watch (occasionally, for me). Probably not always at the edge of the seat, but the tension slowly building up during the game can be pretty exciting, especially seeing how players respond to that tension and stress.

Having a obnoxious loud audience when your nerves are already at the breaking point, and you need to play a very, very accurate stone, and need all your senses to get it on the required path, and need communication with your teammates to get it exactly right.. yeah, that's pretty disrespectful to the players.

Atraveller
2010-Feb-23, 12:41 AM
Yeah, I painted my chest half red, half white, and drank booze and hollared loudly, and would you believe, they threw me out of the golf tournament!

You don't say? The nerve... Hey was Tiger playing by any chance?

(there has to be a tiger joke in there somewhere - with a chest painted red and white and booze all over?)

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-23, 01:00 AM
Having a obnoxious loud audience when your nerves are already at the breaking point, and you need to play a very, very accurate stone, and need all your senses to get it on the required path, and need communication with your teammates to get it exactly right.

Vasily Zaytsev 1942. Silence on the battle field please.

Games of nerve are supposed to transcend extraneous distractions. That is why we played them in the first place. I think we are losing touch and giving sportsmen too much respect. If you are that good, no noise will distract you.

slang
2010-Feb-23, 01:07 AM
Games of nerve are supposed to transcend extraneous distractions. That is why we played them in the first place. I think we are losing touch and giving sportsmen too much respect. If you are that good, no noise will distract you.

Put that on a banner and carry it into Wimbledon or the Crucible, and see how popular you will be :)

Lianachan
2010-Feb-23, 01:09 AM
The complaint sounds like an excuse.

On the other hand, the crowds getting excited with curling is something I canīt really grasp. It is easily the most boring sport ever invented.

I'll see your curling, and raise you cricket!

Moose
2010-Feb-23, 01:11 AM
When it comes to winter sports,
(When it is cold,)
It is generally thought,
(So we are told,)
That Hockey is the game
To which we flock.

But if you actually play,
(Participate!)
Then curling wins the day.
(It's really great!)
In Canada more people curl
Than hock.

- The Curling Song (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7urWw6SwQVw), Bowser and Blue

grant hutchison
2010-Feb-23, 01:13 AM
The curlers need to communicate with their broomers.Those would be sweepers. At least, they are in Scotland; maybe something happened to the terminology after we exported the game. The skip needs to be able to direct the thrower, and then the sweepers and skip need to be able to communicate back and forth while the stone is in motion.


If you are that good, no noise will distract you.If the skip can't direct the play because of the noise of the crowd, that counts as rather more than distraction.

Grant Hutchison

kleindoofy
2010-Feb-23, 01:28 AM
...
In Canada more people curl
Than hock ....
I would love to add a rhyme as to what people really do on cold winter evenings, but then I would be banned. ;)

Moose
2010-Feb-23, 01:28 AM
Those would be sweepers. At least, they are in Scotland; maybe something happened to the terminology after we exported the game. The skip needs to be able to direct the thrower, and then the sweepers and skip need to be able to communicate back and forth while the stone is in motion.

Nah, it's still sweepers and skip.

And yeah, that communication lets the skip (who can see the play) direct the sweepers who are steering a forty pound granite stone around other stones in the way.

There's a lot of strategy in Curling. You can expect the skips are planning their strategy two or three ends ahead.

novaderrik
2010-Feb-23, 02:07 AM
the people in the crowd payed good money to watch the game or match or whatever they call it in curling. they should be allowed to yell, hoot, and holler as much as they want. if the people sliding the rocks can't take it, then they aren't the best in the world and shouldn't be there.

grant hutchison
2010-Feb-23, 02:17 AM
the people in the crowd payed good money to watch the game or match or whatever they call it in curling. they should be allowed to yell, hoot, and holler as much as they want. if the people sliding the rocks can't take it, then they aren't the best in the world and shouldn't be there.As already described, the game requires communication; interfering with the communication spoils the game that the crowd has paid good money to see.

And there are also games that people pay to see in order to stay silent while the player takes the shot: golf, snooker and darts, for instance. They appreciate that this improves the game that they are paying to see.

Grant Hutchison

megrfl
2010-Feb-23, 02:38 AM
The last I saw of Curling at these Olympics began with an interview with a fan. He was painted half white and blue. He was also ringing a cowbell, he stated that earlier at the same venue that the ringer flew out of the bell and hit an audience member on the shoulder. :clap:

novaderrik
2010-Feb-23, 03:29 AM
As already described, the game requires communication; interfering with the communication spoils the game that the crowd has paid good money to see.

And there are also games that people pay to see in order to stay silent while the player takes the shot: golf, snooker and darts, for instance. They appreciate that this improves the game that they are paying to see.

Grant Hutchison
there are a lot of games that require communication, and yet have rowdy crowds.

Lianachan
2010-Feb-23, 08:15 AM
there are a lot of games that require communication, and yet have rowdy crowds.

The shouting in this case sounds very like gamesmanship, actively and intentionally interfering with the opponents game. Such behaviour is not appropriate for the sport of curling. If fans were behaving like that at, say, Wimbledon, they'd soon be thrown out - despite having paid their good money to see the sport. Buying a ticket does not give anybody the right to behave badly. Maybe the small print on the back of the tickets should say something to that effect for events where the audience is expected to conduct itself with a little more decorum.

Moose
2010-Feb-23, 08:35 AM
there are a lot of games that require communication, and yet have rowdy crowds.

Even American Football has had to clamp down somewhat on over-noisy stadiums drowning out play.

Besides, watch a Briar or Of Hearts sometime. There's plenty of cheering. Just not while the play is happening. It's just not done.

captain swoop
2010-Feb-23, 08:46 AM
Bowls on Ice isn't it?

Argos
2010-Feb-23, 02:20 PM
I confess having watched womenīs curling last night. It was fun. Lots of pretty broads.

Fazor
2010-Feb-23, 02:29 PM
I confess having watched womenīs curling last night. It was fun. Lots of pretty broads.
I've noticed that too (above average looks of most of the female curlers). It's about the only thing that makes me wish we had more ice around here. ;)

aurora
2010-Feb-23, 03:50 PM
there are a lot of games that require communication, and yet have rowdy crowds.

And some that don't.

Tennis, anyone?

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-23, 08:13 PM
Well, tennis crowds are certainly getting more rowdy, and darts games have never really been silent. Snooker are now considering dropping the requirement for complete silence because of a request by the payers themselves.

When these people learnt their trade, it was in noisy environments and not silence. If you can get to the top playing like that, why then should silence be required once you get there.

novaderrik
2010-Feb-24, 02:22 AM
And some that don't.

Tennis, anyone?
what kind of communication is required in tennis? you see a ball come hurtling towards you, you hit it back..

BigDon
2010-Feb-24, 03:50 AM
Rumor has it, growing grass has its fans too. Fascinating. ;)

I think curling is one of those sports which are wonderful to play oneself, but just terribly boring to watch.

I have a very nice lawn. Even in winter. Or what passes for it around here.

Tom Servo
2010-Feb-24, 06:35 AM
I think its highly inapropriate to be loud and obnoxious at a game like curling.

I think curling gets a bad rep. Its no doubt very hard to master.

I do wonder why do they seperate the men and women? This seems like a sport that would be an equal challenge to both men and women.

Spoons
2010-Feb-24, 08:20 AM
Well, tennis crowds are certainly getting more rowdy, and darts games have never really been silent. Snooker are now considering dropping the requirement for complete silence because of a request by the payers themselves.

When these people learnt their trade, it was in noisy environments and not silence. If you can get to the top playing like that, why then should silence be required once you get there.

This is an incorrect statement.

In tennis you can be ejected from the stadium for making a racket (heh heh) while a point is in progress.

Much like lawn bowls, which I've just started playing in the last few years, you play in an arena of respectful people, who appreciate the game for what it is.

If you want to hoot loudly and act like a general nuisance, become a politician and have fun in question time.

Curling, like lawn bowls and tennis is a civilised game where people are expected to show courtesy.

Lianachan
2010-Feb-24, 08:26 AM
I think its highly inapropriate to be loud and obnoxious at a game like curling.

I think curling gets a bad rep. Its no doubt very hard to master.

I do wonder why do they seperate the men and women? This seems like a sport that would be an equal challenge to both men and women.

I definitely agree about it being inappropriate, during play. Probably OK between ends, but with four matches being played simultaneously......

I actually watched the GB vs Norway match last night/this morning - the first time I've watched an entire curling match. I actually really enjoyed it. The sport is immensely skilled and extremely tactical.

I've no idea why the women and men are separated. Are the stones different weights or something? Don't know.

Spoons
2010-Feb-24, 08:41 AM
If the reasoning is the same as Lawn Bowls (which is may not be, I don't know curling much, other than a passing admiration for it) it is really just a matter of tradition.

I would expect it is similar in that you have varied weighting levels for your stones which you can choose from, depending on your preference. Heavier ones are a little harder to control but have more punch to knock other ones out.

Moose
2010-Feb-24, 10:16 AM
I've no idea why the women and men are separated. Are the stones different weights or something? Don't know.

Twice as many matches. :) (Seriously, Spoons is right. Tradition.)

aurora
2010-Feb-24, 05:15 PM
what kind of communication is required in tennis? you see a ball come hurtling towards you, you hit it back..

I think you missed the point. I was saying that tennis didn't require communication, and yet loud noise during a serve is not allowed from the crowd.

Spoons said it is an ejectable offense.

Jim
2010-Feb-24, 06:00 PM
I do wonder why do they seperate the men and women? This seems like a sport that would be an equal challenge to both men and women.

The Simpsons just aired an episode about CoEd Olympic Curling with Marge, Homer, Skinner and his mom representing the USA. They won the gold based on Marge's superiour sweeping skills.

kleindoofy
2010-Feb-24, 10:09 PM
I was just thinking that it would be kind of creepy to see a 15 round heavyweight championship boxing match where the crowd was nearly silent.

Lianachan
2010-Feb-24, 11:20 PM
Watching the curling over the last couple of nights has really improved my linguistic skills.

I'm not sure about the spellings, but from listening to players it seems like:

1) The Norwegian for "Haaaaaaaaaard!" is "Haaaaaaaaaard!", and
2) The Swedish for "Haaaaaaaaaard!" is "Haaaaaaaaaard!".

kleindoofy
2010-Feb-24, 11:32 PM
...
1) The Norwegian for "Haaaaaaaaaard!" is "Haaaaaaaaaard!", and
2) The Swedish for "Haaaaaaaaaard!" is "Haaaaaaaaaard!".
Yes, and either Chinese "Goooooooooo!" means "stick your broom in the opponent's eye" or it is eerily synonymous English "Goooooooooo!"

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-25, 01:31 AM
The Simpsons just aired an episode about CoEd Olympic Curling with Marge, Homer, Skinner and his mom representing the USA. They won the gold based on Marge's superiour sweeping skills.

Good point, maybe I should get the wife into it. She's already a dab hand at extreme ironing after years of training.

DonM435
2010-Feb-25, 01:41 AM
...

I think curling is one of those sports which are wonderful to play oneself, but just terribly boring to watch.

Yep. Do it in the privacy of your home, but there's no excuse for putting it on television.

;)

Spoons
2010-Feb-25, 03:00 AM
Yep. Do it in the privacy of your home, but there's no excuse for putting it on television.
I'd say the same thing about the television show Friends.

By all means, please have friends, and enjoy their company in the privacy of your own homes, even make stupid and unfunny comments among yourselves if you wish, but please don't put that rubbish on television. ;)

It's broadcast time that could be used to calibrate the colour settings of my tv.

PS - extreme ironing (http://www.stilmasculin.ro/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/extreme-ironing-042.jpg) rocks! Such a varied (http://images.google.com.au/images?hl=en&q=extreme%20ironing&oq=&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi) sport!

DonM435
2010-Feb-25, 04:18 PM
...
In Canada more people curl
Than hock.
...


If you told me you were going to watch the hock-ers and the luge-ers, I'd probably advise you not to stand downwind.

mugaliens
2010-Feb-26, 01:37 AM
If you told me you were going to watch the hock-ers and the luge-ers, I'd probably advise you not to stand downwind.

As in "hock a lu..."

Nevermind.

DonM435
2010-Feb-26, 01:39 AM
It may be one of the other obscure Olympic competitions; I mean, how can we be sure?

RAF_Blackace
2010-Feb-26, 01:48 AM
This is an incorrect statement.

In tennis you can be ejected from the stadium for making a racket (heh heh) while a point is in progress.

This is an incorrect statement. You can only be ejected from the stadium for making noise during a serve. For the rest of the rally the crowd is allowed its woops and awwws, I have been to Wimbledon and have read the rules :)

If they tried to invoke that rule (the one you quoted) to the strictest extent, there would be no one left in the stadium.

Spoons
2010-Feb-26, 02:09 AM
I stand corrected. (I should have checked the fine print)

However, the period of serving, where silence is required could be considered similar to the period just prior to releasing the stone, where communication between the team is necessary. I suppose once the stone has been released the sweepers could function among themselves regardless of noise levels.

From what I understood of the OP the noise was continuous and would have made the tactical chatter between the team much more troublesome than it should be under normal curling etiquette.

Bluevision
2010-Feb-26, 03:20 AM
On the other hand, the crowds getting excited with curling is something I canīt really grasp. It is easily the most boring sport ever invented.I'm guessing there's at least one other person who's dealt with this post, but I disagree! It may move slowly, but it's very strategic, I'd compare it as golf on steroids. I usually don't go for the slow sports (Soccer, Fencing and Snowboarding here,) but I'm just totally transfixed as I'm watching it. But then again, maybe it's just a national thing, I'm not sure :lol:

HenrikOlsen
2010-Feb-26, 03:59 AM
I stand corrected. (I should have checked the fine print)

However, the period of serving, where silence is required could be considered similar to the period just prior to releasing the stone, where communication between the team is necessary. I suppose once the stone has been released the sweepers could function among themselves regardless of noise levels.
Actually, it's the sweepers efforts that are being directed continuously by the team captain/tactician who watches how the stone moves. It's that time communication is crucial.

And you have several games playing at the same time, in different stages, so no matter what's going on with one game you're likely to have another at a critical point.

Spoons
2010-Feb-26, 06:41 AM
Ah, I see.

I really must get a chance to see some more of this sport. Hopefully the ladies matches. :D

Moose
2010-Feb-26, 10:22 AM
Actually, it's the sweepers efforts that are being directed continuously by the team captain/tactician who watches how the stone moves. It's that time communication is crucial.

Yup. The sweepers can't see the shot or read the ice from above the stone while on the move. They're too busy to look.

The skip is looking down the length of the ice (usually from the house) and can see what the stone is doing, and can tell the sweepers how to adjust the trajectory so it comes in right.

I've put some links to some interesting shots. They aren't finesse shots, but if the stones struck so much as an inch off, they wouldn't have come off that way. They're steered in.

(Note: One point is scored for every rock of yours that is closer to the button than the other team's closest rock. All three of these shots are made in a make-or-break come-from-behind situation.)

(Also note, keep the volume low on the first link. It gets noisy.)

Jennifer Jones winning the Tournament of Hearts, 2008 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CM5mFH3_Qhs)
Men's Olympics, 2006 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxmrH20IA2Q)
Glenn Howard winning the Briar, 2009 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EswFKNXjMo)

Spoons
2010-Feb-26, 10:42 AM
Very impressive shots!

(Just saw the Drinkers with a Curling Problem video linked to one of those vids you posted Moose. Is that where the game is heading? :D)

Moose
2010-Feb-26, 11:07 AM
Heh. Most (if not all) curling clubs forbid drinks of any kind near the ice surface. (Spills of any kind would ruin the ice.)

But pretty much, curling as a small town sport is a social gathering first and foremost. The curling is something fun to do while being with your friends.

Spoons
2010-Feb-26, 11:12 AM
Again, much like my experience with bowls - it forms probably the largest part of most the club members' lives down at my club.

I wonder, with our drinks arrangement, we are not allowed drinks onto the green due to liquor licenses. $10K fine for the club if they're caught allowing drinks within the "sporting arena" section. That isn't similar for the curling drinks setups?

Moose
2010-Feb-26, 11:33 AM
It might be, I really couldn't say.

All I know for certain is that curling clubs are (rightly) protective of the ice surfaces. It's not like an ice rink, you can't just fix it by running the zamboni over it and all better. With a curling surface, flooding the ice is only the first step.