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View Full Version : Oh, no. JVC wood cone speakers are gone?



SkepticJ
2010-Feb-22, 08:22 PM
I read about JVC's wood cone speakers years ago in Popular Science, and wanted to get some someday--still do, very much.

They still have some info on them on their site, wood cone speakers (http://www.jvc.com/presentations/WoodConeSpeakers/index.html), but virtually all their products with them are now gone. Amazon--gone. Best Buy--gone. Gone, gone, gone.

What in the world is going on? They spent twenty years working on making something that is timeless and beautiful, and then stop?

chrissy
2010-Feb-22, 08:31 PM
I have found somewhere that sells them over here :whistle:

Here (https://www.forumhifivisual.co.uk/HiFi_Equipment/Mini_Systems/JVC_EX_AK2DB_DVD_MINI_SYSTEM_WITH_HIGH_QUALITY_WOO D_CONE_SPEAKERS_2104.html) :)

sarongsong
2010-Feb-22, 08:52 PM
"They" wouldn't fit in the title? :rolleyes:

redshifter
2010-Feb-22, 09:19 PM
Interesting concept, but it looks like a lot of marketing double-speak got thrown into JVC's website as well. Big surprise. I'd be interested in the frequency response of the wood cones. At what frequencies does the cone break up, what resonances do the cones have, what crossover tricks does one need to employ to assure the drivers behave well, etc. It might be that wood just doesn't behave well as a driver material, although some of the better drivers in the world still use a paper cone; albiet coated in some cases.

SkepticJ
2010-Feb-26, 06:12 PM
I have found somewhere that sells them over here :whistle:

Here (https://www.forumhifivisual.co.uk/HiFi_Equipment/Mini_Systems/JVC_EX_AK2DB_DVD_MINI_SYSTEM_WITH_HIGH_QUALITY_WOO D_CONE_SPEAKERS_2104.html) :)

Thanks. :)

hhEb09'1
2010-Feb-26, 07:09 PM
"They" wouldn't fit in the title? :rolleyes:Do now :)

captain swoop
2010-Feb-27, 12:35 AM
I haven't found anything better than my 1980s vintage Mission 770s.

LotusExcelle
2010-Feb-27, 12:50 AM
I'm a fan of Meridian products but will never be able to afford anything other than my Klipsch stuff. Wood drivers... I've never heard of. Interesting concept though.

mugaliens
2010-Feb-28, 08:15 AM
Interesting concept, but it looks like a lot of marketing double-speak got thrown into JVC's website as well.

Agreed. Marketing gimmick.

Carbon-fiber is the best - stiffer, more uniform mass distribution, lighter, and longer-lasting.

Another thought came to mind: Aesthetics. If one is going to have speakers with wooden cones, one will want to display them without the grills!

cjl
2010-Feb-28, 09:38 AM
I have a nice set of B&W speakers with Kevlar cones (admittedly pretty low in the B&W line though), and I really like them. I'm not sure why you would want wood (aside from the aesthetics) - the reason wood is used for instruments is the resonances and harmonics, and that's precisely what you don't want a speaker adding to the sound it is reproducing.

captain swoop
2010-Feb-28, 02:44 PM
the reason wood is used for instruments is the resonances and harmonics, and that's precisely what you don't want a speaker adding to the sound it is reproducing.

Of course you do. Any set of speakers will add resonances and harmonics. When we choose speakers we choose a set that has resonances and harmonics that we like. I had a set of Quad Electrostatics before the 770s, they were to my ears very 'dry' but their 'measured' audio spectrum was very faithful to what came out of a desk or recording. My Missions aren't as 'flat' but in the room where I do my listening they sound better. Bass is more punchy and the top end seems crisper.

chrissy
2010-Feb-28, 07:48 PM
Thanks. :)

You are welcome, I hope it helped?

SkepticJ
2010-Mar-01, 01:37 AM
You are welcome, I hope it helped?

Yeah. I'll buy from overseas. I can't afford them now, though--poor college student.

For right now I make do with high-ish end Sony earbuds. I don't know how they do it, but the things do thumping bass.

I looked on the main JVC websites for several countries besides the US, and they still have them. Dunno why they're missing Stateside.

redshifter
2010-Mar-01, 04:48 AM
Agreed. Marketing gimmick.

Carbon-fiber is the best - stiffer, more uniform mass distribution, lighter, and longer-lasting.

Another thought came to mind: Aesthetics. If one is going to have speakers with wooden cones, one will want to display them without the grills!

There really isn't a 'best' material for speaker cones, there are many great drivers out there with a variety of cone materials. It all depends on what type of parameters (including cost, though even some cost-no-object drivers are still good 'ol paper) the mfg. is trying to meet.

chrlzs
2010-Mar-01, 05:21 AM
Thanks for this post, SkepticJ. I'm a bit of an old school audiophile, and have long had a fondness for JVC stuff. I'd never heard of these, and it sounds :lol: interesting.

I know audio reviews often depend largely on what the reviewer drank in the last few hours, but this one caught my eye:

http://www.hometheatermag.com/hometheaterinabox/906jvc/#

Hmmmmm.

And who wouldn't want speakers that do so well on barnyard sounds..? :)

Pity they are mated to the amplifier, tho'. I like chopping and changing..

mugaliens
2010-Mar-01, 08:38 AM
Of course you do. Any set of speakers will add resonances and harmonics.

True. However, we want to minimize any such additions from the speakers, so as to avoid coloring the recorded sound, which already has it's own such colorations, preferrably only those accurately reproducing the original.

The goal of any true audiophile is to accurately reproduce the sound waves which exist at the time of the original recording.


For right now I make do with high-ish end Sony earbuds. I don't know how they do it, but the things do thumping bass.

I concur! My most recent ones are $99, and outperform a pair of $230+ studio monitor headphones, also made by Sony, that come extraordinarily highly recommended throughout the audio production world.

Speaking of which, I need to finish Starship Troopers before heading to bed... :)

cjl
2010-Mar-01, 09:07 AM
Yeah. I'll buy from overseas. I can't afford them now, though--poor college student.

For right now I make do with high-ish end Sony earbuds. I don't know how they do it, but the things do thumping bass.

I looked on the main JVC websites for several countries besides the US, and they still have them. Dunno why they're missing Stateside.
High end earbuds can do surprisingly well. I really like my Sennheiser IE7s, but they don't quite sound as good as my B&W speakers. There's just something about a good speaker that no headphones or earbuds (that I've yet found at least) can reproduce. Of course, the earbuds are nice for both portability and the ability to not bug everyone around you.

chrissy
2010-Mar-01, 08:28 PM
Yeah. I'll buy from overseas. I can't afford them now, though--poor college student.

For right now I make do with high-ish end Sony earbuds. I don't know how they do it, but the things do thumping bass.

I looked on the main JVC websites for several countries besides the US, and they still have them. Dunno why they're missing Stateside.

Maybe one day you will get them. :)
I have always liked JVC, my bass speakers in my car were always JVC...:D only 800watts of boom, but they were great.

Head Candy/skull Candy earphones are a good brand, the sound is crystal clear.

captain swoop
2010-Mar-01, 09:16 PM
The goal of any true audiophile is to accurately reproduce the sound waves which exist at the time of the original recording.



That's what the 'Audiophile' always claims. I have a colleague with 'High End' Audio gear. Full works LinnDeck and Amp, Mission 774 arm. Some outlandish CD deck, Quad Amp. It sounds great. Unfortunately having spent many hours working in studios it sounds not a lot like the actual instruments. It is his idealized version of real sound. Coloured with all the harmonics his system produces. They are all expensive 'high end' harmonics that produce a lovely sound but they are there.

redshifter
2010-Mar-01, 09:44 PM
That's what the 'Audiophile' always claims. I have a colleague with 'High End' Audio gear. Full works LinnDeck and Amp, Mission 774 arm. Some outlandish CD deck, Quad Amp. It sounds great. Unfortunately having spent many hours working in studios it sounds not a lot like the actual instruments. It is his idealized version of real sound. Coloured with all the harmonics his system produces. They are all expensive 'high end' harmonics that produce a lovely sound but they are there.

Not to mention how badly the room itself may be 'distorting' the sound, with nulls, early reflections, room modes, etc.

nauthiz
2010-Mar-01, 10:07 PM
The goal of any true audiophile is to accurately reproduce the sound waves which exist at the time of the original recording.

If that's the case, then I find myself wondering why there's not more wailing and gnashing of teeth in protest of the practices of mixing and mastering within the audiophile community.

Complaining, with good reason, that the current fashion for how to do it often produces terrible results, sure, but not complaining at the very fact that there are people whose entire purpose in life is to alter the sound waves which existed at the time of the original recording on order to achieve some artificial aesthetic goal.

mugaliens
2010-Mar-01, 10:16 PM
If that's the case, then I find myself wondering why there's not more wailing and gnashing of teeth in protest of the practices of mixing and mastering within the audiophile community.

Oh, there is - huge amounts! But only for "pure" recordings such as traditional, non-electric instruments.


Complaining, with good reason, that the current fashion for how to do it often produces terrible results, sure, but not complaining at the very fact that there are people whose entire purpose in life is to alter the sound waves which existed at the time of the original recording on order to achieve some artificial aesthetic goal.

In these cases, the audiophiles attempt truism to the signals finalized by the recording studio.


Not to mention how badly the room itself may be 'distorting' the sound, with nulls, early reflections, room modes, etc.

Good point. What's a "true" listening environment? A flat, grassy field on a calm, moonlight evening?

Nicolas
2010-Mar-02, 02:59 PM
Do specify the temperature and humidity of said moonlit grassy field. ;)

I am fully aware that I'm listening to heavily coloured sound, not in the least by my living room's limitations. Most of the colourisation (by the equipment) I like, some (by the room) I don't. I'm curious how things will turn out when I move in a few years time.

Many of the claims about "as it sounded during recording" are made by people who haven't got a clue about how things go in a studio. :) "as I like it" is my only reference for my home audio system.

I haven't heard the JVC woodcone speakers. Don't know if they sound good or only look pretty.

captain swoop
2010-Mar-02, 09:03 PM
'As I like it' is the only thing that counts.

Hornblower
2010-Mar-03, 12:06 AM
High end earbuds can do surprisingly well. I really like my Sennheiser IE7s, but they don't quite sound as good as my B&W speakers. There's just something about a good speaker that no headphones or earbuds (that I've yet found at least) can reproduce. Of course, the earbuds are nice for both portability and the ability to not bug everyone around you.

My bold for reference. That "something" consists of bass sound waves that you can feel with your whole body, not just your eardrums.

cjl
2010-Mar-03, 12:39 AM
My bold for reference. That "something" consists of bass sound waves that you can feel with your whole body, not just your eardrums.

That's not all though. Even in music with no bass, the treble still just sounds better from by B&W speakers than it does from my earbuds.

mugaliens
2010-Mar-03, 04:39 AM
Do specify the temperature and humidity of said moonlit grassy field. ;)

Hopefully both "breathy" and "warm" nestled next to the right girl. :lol:


I am fully aware that I'm listening to heavily coloured sound, not in the least by my living room's limitations. Most of the colourisation (by the equipment) I like, some (by the room) I don't. I'm curious how things will turn out when I move in a few years time.

That and speaker placement is crucial. Last weekend the host of a party was complaining about how his speakers sounded muddied in his room, and was talking about replacing carpets, or getting new speakers. When I moved them from one inch to about eight inches away from the wall, the muddiness disappear.


Many of the claims about "as it sounded during recording" are made by people who haven't got a clue about how things go in a studio. :) "as I like it" is my only reference for my home audio system.

And as the consumer, that's indeed the ultimate goal!