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manxman
2010-Feb-23, 02:28 AM
[Previously removed post restored at OP's request, with some problematic material redacted]

edited to say
thanks peter.



the only people faster than this guy are your rocket jockeys.





No1 John McGuinness


lap distance 37.25m 60.7km
race distance 223.5 m 364.2 km
Outright lap record holder John McGuinness Honda CBR1000RR 2009 131.578 miles per hour (211.754 km/h)


Nicknames McG, Morecambe Missile
Nationality English
Isle of Man TT career
TTs contested 13 (1996 - 2000, 2002 - present)
TT wins 15
First TT win 1999 Lightweight 250 TT
Last TT win 2009 Superbike TT
Podiums 29

The Isle of Man TT (Tourist Trophy) Race is a motorcycle racing event held on the Isle of Man and was for many years the most prestigious motor-cycle race in the world.

"The oldest motor-cycle racing circuit still in use is the Snaefell Mountain Course over which the Isle of Man Tourist Trophy races are run. Starting at the town of Douglas on the south-east coast, the course takes a wide sweep to the west and north to enter the town of Ramsey on the north-east coast and thence return to the starting point, each lap measuring 37 3/4 miles (60.7 km) and taking in over 200 bends while climbing from sea level to an altitude of over 1,300 ft (396 m). This circuit is the epitome of the natural road course, all the roads used being ordinary public highways closed for the racing and practice sessions



2006
TT 2006 proved to be the best ever for McGuinness. He won three races (Senior, Superbike and Supersport) and he lowered the outright lap record four times during the festival. This all started in the TT Superbike race on 3 June, recording 17:42.53 from a standing start, then 17:41.71 on the second lap. His record lap stood at 127.933 mph to take in the 37.73 miles of the Mountain course, before another record-breaking performance in the Senior TT race on 9 June. John set a time of 17:39.95 from a standing start (already 1.76 seconds faster than a racing lap) and then blitzed the course in 17:29.26, 10.69 seconds faster than his opening lap and at an average speed of 129.451 mph.

[edit] 2007
TT 2007 was also a great year with McGuinness taking wins in the Superbike TT and the Senior TT with lap and race records in both, the Senior lap record of 17:21.99 averaging 130.354 mph not only the outright lap record but the first to break the 130 mph barrier.

[edit] 2008
The 2008 Isle of Man TT saw McGuinness struggle with reliability problems with his bikes, but did manage to pick up his 14th career win on the island, in the Senior TT. This win moves him alongside Mike Hailwood as the joint second-placed rider with most wins.

[edit] 2009
McGuinness surpassed Hailwood's mark during the rain-delayed opening race of the 2009 Isle of Man TT on June 8, 2009. After Cameron Donald unofficially lapped the course at over 131 mph during practice, McGuinness broke the outright lap record by 0.7 seconds, taking the lap record to 17:21.29 or 130.442 mph. McGuinness held off team-mate Steve Plater by 18.11 seconds to record victory number fifteen. That was his only win and podium of the week, however he did finish the week with a new outright lap record, and the fastest lap ever recorded with a 17:12.30 or 131.578 mph lap on the second lap of the Senior TT. A broken chain cost him a runaway victory, as Plater took his second career TT win.




whhhoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooosh .

onboard lap from the late david jefferies. .. the course gets them all in the end 200 mph on 25ft wide roads with only brick walls to point the front wheel between, and they are our main roads aswell..
the vid is good but you dont really get just how bumpy the roads are unless you realise how hard the front suspension is working.
he is marsheling a roads opening suzuki road bike but using the occassion as a sneaky practice session after getting seriously injured some months earlier..
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xbzz9_moto-david-jeffries-full-lap-tt_sport

manxman
2010-Feb-23, 03:40 AM
quote.
onboard lap from the late david jefferies. .. the course gets them all in the end 200 mph on 25ft wide roads with only brick walls to point the front wheel between.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiKmPFo6xNA
you dont get the crash at full speed until 40 sec i defy anyone not to wince/jump even tho you see the crash twice before the full speed job he is doing 190mph after coming down brayhill which proceeds a mile long straight going thru the grandstand.

this one is of my m8s son he also lived and retired from racing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Nzq2GorVH4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjkaVytvhNc&feature=related




if they flock from all around the world to our little island to compete in our once a year TT knowing that anything from 2 or 3 to 5 or 8 of them will be returning home in pine overcoats {and these include some of the greatest riders to ever sit on a motorbike as you have to posses a topflight racing liscence to compete , well the ones with enough bottle}, it must still be the ultimate biking challenge despite the drop in prestige due to all the fatalities.

a racing legend of mine barry sheen 2 actually randy mamola aswell both refused their invites on several occassions which was dissapointing, atleast sheen accepted the invite to come and ride the roads open bike as jeffries is doing above such is the fame and fear of the course in the racing community, if they didnt do the tt they were never really classed as real world champs in the biking community in them days amongst their fellow riders worldwide, he rode a road legal honda 750cc fireblade if think, the chance to take on the course on closed roads were too great a draw for him but he refused to compete as he said he thought there was an excellent chance the course would claim him aswell if he did.

captain swoop
2010-Feb-23, 05:55 PM
Interesting as far as it goes. I have been over to the 'Island' a number of times for TT week and done a few fast laps, I didn't think it any more intimidating than my usual fast biking roads over the moors.. In fact with the road closed for the TT there was a distinct lack of tractors and day trippers in the way. I know actual racing is a different thing but I have had a fair few crashes in my day.
I never watched much racing though, it's not as exciting as the Moto GP or Superbikes and hasn't been of any interest outside it's mainly British fans since it was last a Championship round many decades ago. It's more of a 'festival' of Biking now.

If you want real Motorbike race records you need the GP Series

All Classes
15 titles: Giacomo Agostini
13 titles: Angel Nieto
9 titles: Mike Hailwood, Carlo Ubbiali
7 titles: Valentino Rossi , Phil Read, John Surtees

Premier Class
8 titles: Giacomo Agostini 15 world titles;
5 titles: Mick Doohan ; Valentino Rossi
4 titles: Eddie Lawson, Geoff Duke, Mike Hailwood, John Surtees

Giacomo Agostini - 68 GP wins - 22 Consecutive
Mick Doohan - 54 GP wins
Valentino Rossi - 54 GP wins ; - 22 Consecutive

As for fast Americans

What about
Wayne Rainey 24 Championship wins and 3 Championships
Kevin Schwantz a Championship and 25 wins
Kenny Roberts 3 Championships and 24 wins (My fave rider)

to name just 3

manxman
2010-Feb-23, 06:00 PM
captain i am sorry i was editing as you posted.

not much different now but i had to untie whats left from the dregs of the material i asked peter to delete sorry.

many tt legends on your list there.

micheal dunlop is the heir supreme.

the TT was marginalised on safety grounds after the kick off by that motor cycling paper many moons ago.

captain when you see the crash at the bottom of bray hill full speed you can see his class as a rider he gets the bike on its side as he was going to hit the house wall at the junction.
yes he knew it was going to hurt but skillful to part company before hitting..

captain swoop
2010-Feb-23, 06:45 PM
It wasn't just the Motorcycle Press that got it dropped it was the pressure from the riders as well. I rememebr when the course in Finland used to have a Railway Crossing on it and hay bales in front of telegraph posts.

Kenny Roberts did for safety in the Motorcycle GP what Jackie Stewart did in the F1.

No rider should have to worry about hitting a house when he is racing.
I admire the TTriders for their bravery but not their sense.

I am afraid a Time Trial isn't exciting enough for me as a spectator. I want to see neck and neck 3 abreast into a corner heroics and hear the howl of 20 bikes at the start line.

I am quite skillful at crashing. My last big spill that killed my Ducati was 2 years ago. Front wheel went picking it up form the apex of a bend I have ridden hundreds of times near Scarborough. I kicked the bike away and slid to a stop the bike went into a ditch and flipped. Helmet and leathers were the only damage to me tat time but the bike was a right off.

manxman
2010-Feb-23, 06:57 PM
i could go fast in a str8 line aswell.

after writing off my first bike a kawasaki kh400 triple 2 stroke i got the brand new at the time z650 4 stroke the very first road bike to have the double drilled front disk brakes.

made no difference to me i still wrote it off and bought a vauxhall viva.






















and started to get laid.

captain swoop
2010-Feb-23, 07:12 PM
How are the two connected? KHs were renowned for their poor handling and brakes but screaming 2 stroke engines. Z650s were better but still not the best handling bikes of their era. A good set of air shocks on the back did a lot to improve them and getting rid of the standard pads improved the brtakes a bit. They had those twin drilled disks for a good reason, they weren't very good brakes. Oneo f my mates had one back in the 80s, he had a mod to put a different master cylinder on the bar that improved them somewhat.

manxman
2010-Feb-23, 07:47 PM
How are the two connected? KHs were renowned for their poor handling and brakes but screaming 2 stroke engines. Z650s were better but still not the best handling bikes of their era.

there only connected because they are the only 2 i ever had.

i just loved the sound that came out of a kwaka.

my mates had faster and bigger bikes i really paid for the looks.

you understand performance was more than i could master as it was i just loved the way they looked and sounded.

my 400 was green

and the 650 blue.

and i needed stabilisers.

so after several spills eventually i knackered them both.

captain swoop
2010-Feb-23, 08:06 PM
How are the two connected? KHs were renowned for their poor handling and brakes but screaming 2 stroke engines. Z650s were better but still not the best handling bikes of their era.

I meant your Viva and your last comment.

My first bike was a Yamaha RD250 two stroke, it was in yellow and black 'Team' colours and went like stink, it had 'Micron' tuned pipes, stainless Redd Valves on the induction and the ports had a couple of millimetres off the top edges. It made for a narrow power band but it didn't half go.

manxman
2010-Feb-23, 09:23 PM
motor bike doesnt have a back seat and an 18/19 yr old with a car was popular back then over here anyway, we are only country folk and i am talking 32 years ago and i could always be the stranger in the village pud or clud/disco which had 12 girls all dancing around their woodpecker cider bottles.

captain swoop
2010-Feb-23, 10:21 PM
Most of the girls I knew had their own bikes, I never considered a car until I was about 30.

eric_marsh
2010-Feb-23, 11:36 PM
I have a lot of respect for anyone who is competitive in the TT. There's fast and then there's right on the edge with no escape plan if things go bad fast. I think the TT is in the second category, which is why the Isle of Mann has also been called "Blood Bath Island."

Speaking of rides, I took my ZX-14 out last weekend for the first time in quite a while. I like to follow the crowd and let the hot, young riders scope out the cops for me. Without pushing the bike nearly as hard as I could I still saw 160 on the speedo.

It's up for sale - I want use the money to build an airplane.

NorthernBoy
2010-Feb-24, 01:20 PM
I have a lot of respect for anyone who is competitive in the TT. There's fast and then there's right on the edge with no escape plan if things go bad fast. I think the TT is in the second category, which is why the Isle of Mann has also been called "Blood Bath Island."

I agree. It adds a whole new element wen you know that you cannot afford to crash, and where you are contending with real roads which have such varying conditions.

It's so highly respected for the same reason that the Nurburgring is, namely because it is so long that it takes real effort to learn to get the best from it, because it punishes mistakes so much more severely than a modern GP track, and because conditions can vary so much over the length of it.

I don't quite get the "no more intimidating" than the roads of Yorkshire comment above, mind. Averaging 130 miles per hour across the same roads there would be just as hard, but no-one is out trying to do that.

captain swoop
2010-Feb-24, 01:43 PM
Who isn't?